bluenose / blue nose

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bluenose / blue nose

Post by Archived Topic » Sat Oct 30, 2004 7:27 pm

Fierce fight in a german translation forum:

"Blue nose" should connote a puritan.

Simple as that, and if so, why?
Submitted by Jan Saudek (Marbach - Germany)
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bluenose / blue nose

Post by Archived Reply » Sat Oct 30, 2004 7:41 pm

Jan, The term BLUENOSE or BLUE-NOSE or BLUE NOSE is used to describe an ultraconservative in matters of morality, a person of rigid puritanical habits, a puritan, a prude or prig. The color ‘blue’ has long been associated with conservatism and strictness, though for what reason is not entirely clear. Perhaps it is from the blue in ‘blue blood’ (1835), which is the translation of the Spanish ‘sangre azulis,’ that which flows in the veins of old and aristocratic families, although aristocracy doesn’t always imply conservatism. Another possible connection is to the ‘blue laws’–stringent restrictions on moral conduct with harsh penalties for infractions. Established by the 17th century Puritan leaders of the Commonwealth of Connecticut, the original blue laws were extreme even by the strict standards of the day. Skipping church or playing any sort of game got you fined, and if you burgled your neighbor's house on Sunday, they cut your ear off. The ‘blue’ in ‘blue laws’ meant ‘bloody,’ i.e., enforced by whipping, maiming and death, although popular legend has it that it was because they were printed on blue paper.

The term BLUENOSEwas first used (1698) as a contemptuous nickname for a native of Nova Scotia and probably derives from the name of a popular Nova Scotian potato. In later extended use it also included natives of New Foundland, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, or broadly (and now obsolete) a Canadian.

In the U.S., the name was first applied to lumbermen and fishermen of northern New England (1830) (and later to any Northerner or New Englander) and originally referred to the color of their noses, the blue induced by long exposure to cold weather. Only later (1927) was the word applied to the aristocratic inhabitants of Boston’s Black Bay area in the sense that we know it today, possibly in alluding to their apparently ‘frigid’ manner, possibly as connected to ‘blue blood’ as I suggested above, and possibly in reference to the Puritanical folks who created the ‘blue laws.’[quote]<1927 “With a lot of blue noses on the Board, . . . this concession was not secured without great diplomacy.”--H. C. BROWN ‘In Golden Nineties’ by H. C. Brown, v. page 187>
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Ken G – March 14, 2004
Reply from Ken Greenwald (Fort Collins, CO - U.S.A.)
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bluenose / blue nose

Post by Archived Reply » Sat Oct 30, 2004 7:56 pm

IC..blue as a "imago" of aristocrazy

BTW: the spanish "sangre azule" is easily explained.
At that time the the aristocrazy was mainly composed of visigoths (some northern folks) and the people was mainly composed of those whose very few descendants are now a minority on the fine island Gomera (guanchos) Quite dark skinned.

So, the veins of the aristocratic members are much more visible. And even at that times one already knew that veins have someting to do with blood.

(The other way round: I never forget my blushing when I´ve had asked an african-american: "Did you noticed any red eflorescence?"..then we both laughed out loud)

Thanks as usual for the deep-digging, mind-gobbling and exhaustive <sigh> analysis ;-)

Reply from Jan Saudek (Marbach - Germany)
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bluenose / blue nose

Post by Archived Reply » Sat Oct 30, 2004 8:10 pm

That ship on the Canadian ten-cent piece is the BLUENOSE, built in Nova Scotia. Canadians are very proud of her and for good reason. She has an interesting history. Look it up.
Reply from C L Case (toronto - Canada)
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