Danish pastry - and Rosinenschnecke

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Danish pastry - and Rosinenschnecke

Post by Dunkeld » Fri Feb 21, 2020 1:33 pm

Danish pastry - and Rosinenschnecke


Danish pastry
Danish pastry with apricots and cinnamon

Presuming that it is like a Rosinenschnecke.

Most of these Teilchen are called "Danish" or "Danish pastry" in GB. Why Danish I have no idea, but that's what my parents always order when we're in a German café

https://dict.leo.org/forum/viewUnsolved ... de&lang=de

Rosinenschnecke translates literally as "raisin snail".
I wonder whether those "snails" exist in the English speaking world.

And if so, what is their name?
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Re: Danish pastry - and Rosinenschnecke

Post by Phil White » Fri Feb 21, 2020 6:44 pm

I am probably the worlds least qualified person to answer this, as I rarely, if ever, eat pastries, buns or cakes - apart from a very occasional croissant, although the last one would have been about twelve years ago.

The important thing about Danish pastries is that they are made from "laminated dough" (Blätterteig). From what I have just read, Schnecken, including Rosinenschnecken are not made from laminated dough. But having never eaten one (nor a Chelsea bun as in your link), I really can't comment further.

The Wikipedia article on Danish pastry has a plausible, if not entirely convincing, explanation as to the origin of the term "Danish pastry": https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Danish_pastry

There is no single equivalent in English to the term "Schnecke" for a myriad of different spiral-shaped things ranging from worm gears to pastries. Each has its own term.
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Re: Danish pastry - and Rosinenschnecke

Post by Dunkeld » Fri Feb 21, 2020 8:11 pm

Phil White wrote:
Fri Feb 21, 2020 6:44 pm
I am probably the worlds least qualified person to answer this, as I rarely, if ever, eat pastries, buns or cakes - apart from a very occasional croissant, although the last one would have been about twelve years ago.
So maybe some-one else could help us both? :)
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Re: Danish pastry - and Rosinenschnecke

Post by Erik_Kowal » Fri Feb 21, 2020 10:14 pm

Dunkeld wrote:
Fri Feb 21, 2020 1:33 pm
I wonder whether those "snails" exist in the English speaking world.

And if so, what is their name?
In Danish, those spiral buns are called kanelsnegle (literally "cinnamon snails).

In English, I would call them cinnamon rolls, though according to this Wikipedia page they also go by the names cinnamon bun, cinnamon swirl and cinnamon Danish.

Incidentally, I was curious regarding the difference between the layered dough used for Danish pastries and that used for filo pastry-based products. A bit of surfing brought to light that although both types of dough involve repeatedly rolling out the dough and brushing it with butter between each iteration of rolling, Danish pastries are made with yeast dough whereas filo pastry does not include yeast.
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Re: Danish pastry - and Rosinenschnecke

Post by trolley » Fri Feb 21, 2020 10:59 pm

I was a baker in my early career. There is a lot of cross-over and some confusing definitions regarding different types of baked goods and many differing opinions about exactly what these different terms mean. I apprenticed under an Englishman and here's how it broke down in our little bakery.... Pie pastry (like what you'd get in a quiche or an apple pie) is you basic "shortcrust" (flour, fat, water, and salt). Puffed pastry (like what you'd get around a sausage roll, or a turnover or a Banbury) was a shortcrust pastry that had been rolled and folded with butter and then folded multiple times to create many, many layers with butter between each layer. Your basic bread dough contained flour, water, fat, salt, sugar and a leavening agent (usually yeast). A "sweet dough" was just a bread or roll dough with extra sugar and the addition of milk and egg. This is what you'd use in a cinnamon bun or schnecken or a doughnut. A Danish was a step above. It was any of a number of different shaped treats made with a "puffed dough" or "Danish dough". This dough was made by rolling out a sweet dough and then spreading a thick layer of butter on two-thirds and folding it multiple times like a puffed pastry. This is the same technique used in making croissants but croissants contain less sugar and no egg.
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Re: Danish pastry - and Rosinenschnecke

Post by Dunkeld » Sat Feb 22, 2020 12:49 pm

I have also posted my question there:

https://forum.wordreference.com/threads ... t-18701700

Now I see that some awful type of narrow-minded killjoy Mod has deleted half of my postings there.

I hope and a trust you are more open-minded here. :)
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Re: Danish pastry - and Rosinenschnecke

Post by Dunkeld » Sat Feb 22, 2020 12:50 pm

And: Thank you for your answers in this thread! :)
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Re: Danish pastry - and Rosinenschnecke

Post by Phil White » Sat Feb 22, 2020 2:15 pm

Thank you trolley. Is there no end to the range of skills the Wizards have?
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Re: Danish pastry - and Rosinenschnecke

Post by Dunkeld » Sat Feb 22, 2020 2:30 pm

trolley wrote:
Fri Feb 21, 2020 10:59 pm
I was a baker in my early career. There is a lot of cross-over and some confusing definitions regarding different types of baked goods and many differing opinions about exactly what these different terms mean. I apprenticed under an Englishman and here's how it broke down in our little bakery.... Pie pastry (like what you'd get in a quiche or an apple pie) is you basic "shortcrust" (flour, fat, water, and salt). Puffed pastry (like what you'd get around a sausage roll, or a turnover or a Banbury) was a shortcrust pastry that had been rolled and folded with butter and then folded multiple times to create many, many layers with butter between each layer. Your basic bread dough contained flour, water, fat, salt, sugar and a leavening agent (usually yeast). A "sweet dough" was just a bread or roll dough with extra sugar and the addition of milk and egg. This is what you'd use in a cinnamon bun or schnecken or a doughnut. A Danish was a step above. It was any of a number of different shaped treats made with a "puffed dough" or "Danish dough". This dough was made by rolling out a sweet dough and then spreading a thick layer of butter on two-thirds and folding it multiple times like a puffed pastry. This is the same technique used in making croissants but croissants contain less sugar and no egg.

And what about "rasins" in "snails"?

Or those "Schnecken" made of dough in general? :)
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Re: Danish pastry - and Rosinenschnecke

Post by trolley » Sat Feb 22, 2020 6:22 pm

There were raisins in our schnecken...I'd never heard the term "rosinenschnecke" until you posted. In our bakery the only difference between a cinnamon bun and a schnecken was the topping and the baking method. Both were made from sweet dough, rolled out into a rectangle then covered with butter, cinnamon, sugar, raisins or currants and rolled up into a log. If we were making regular cinnamon buns we'd slice the log into rounds and bake them on a cookie sheet. Once baked, they were topped with an icing sugar glaze or a creamed cheese icing. Schnecken were the same thing but they were baked in a pan, the bottom of which had been spread with a thick coating of caramel sauce and crushed pecans. Once they were done they were removed from the pan and topped with the remaining pecan caramel sauce.
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