sloppy idientity

This is the place to post questions and discussions on usage and style. The members of the Wordwizard Clubhouse will also often be able to help you to formulate that difficult letter.
Post Reply

sloppy idientity

Post by azz » Sat Sep 28, 2019 8:28 pm

a. Glen hates himself and so does Patrick.
Could this mean that Glen hates himself and Patrick also hates Glen?

b. Glen blames himself for the accident and so does his wife.
What meanings could this sentence have?

1. The wife hates herself
2. The wife hates Glen.

Many thanks.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

Re: sloppy idientity

Post by trolley » Sun Sep 29, 2019 12:22 am

I think Glen hates Glen and Patrick hates Patrick. (in a.) Not sure where the wife's hatred is coming from in example b...Glen feels responsible and his wife agrees with him. If she does hate him for that, maybe she should lighten up a bit.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

Re: sloppy idientity

Post by azz » Sun Sep 29, 2019 3:06 am

Thank you so much and much apologies.

I don't know why I wrote 'hates' when I meant 'blames'. Sorry.

1. The wife blames herself
2. The wife blames Glen.

Many thanks.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

Re: sloppy idientity

Post by Erik_Kowal » Sun Sep 29, 2019 4:42 pm

Where there is a possibility of ambiguity of wording leading to a misunderstanding of the intended meaning, just REWRITE the sentence clearly and have done with it, e.g.:

Glen blames/hates himself, and Patrick blames/hates him too.

Both Glen and Patrick blame/hate themselves.

Glen blames himself for the accident. His wife also blames him for it.

Both Glen and his wife blame themselves for the accident.


If clarifying the meaning requires composing two (or more) sentences instead of one, so be it.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

ACCESS_END_OF_TOPIC
Post Reply