with

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with

Post by navi » Sun Nov 04, 2018 5:25 am

Which are correct:

1) He was limping with a sprained ankle.
2) He was limping, with a sprained ankle.

3) I noticed that he was hurt with a sprained ankle.
4) I noticed that he was hurt, with a sprained ankle.


Does the 'with' imply causality in those sentences?

Gratefully,
Navi
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Re: with

Post by Erik_Kowal » Sun Nov 04, 2018 6:30 am

To my mind, 1 and 3 imply causality, whereas 2 and (especially) 4 provide more detail regarding the nature of the ailment but do not necessarily imply causality (thought they do not exclude it either). The comma in each of 2 and 4 makes the clause that follows it parenthetical.
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Re: with

Post by Phil White » Sun Nov 04, 2018 7:05 pm

Frankly, the "with" sounds odd to me, with or without the comma.
I would probably use "from": "He was limping from a sprained ankle". This always implies causality. The comma would merely make it parenthetical, as Erik says.
I would use "with" in a sentence like "He was in hospital/at home/in bed with a sprained ankle".

In your second pair of sentences, I find that both "with" and "from" sound strange. I don't think I would use a formulation of this type at all with "hurt". I would probably just say "he had sprained his ankle".
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Signature: Phil White
Non sum felix lepus

Re: with

Post by gdwdwrkr » Sun Nov 04, 2018 8:27 pm

He was limping, having sprained his ankle.
The original sentences bring images of him limping arm-in-arm with a sprained ankle.
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Re: with

Post by tony h » Sun Nov 04, 2018 10:09 pm

In all those I agree with gdwdwrkr "with" does not sound right. I would always split them from "He was limping with a sprained ankle" into "He was limping. He had a sprained ankle". I might possibly use "He was limping because of a sprained ankle".

The only occasion, that comes to mind for using "with" is "He was taken to hospital with a sprained ankle" .
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Signature: tony

I'm puzzled therefore I think.

End of topic.
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