Trousers

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Trousers

Post by Stevenloan » Tue Aug 07, 2018 4:27 pm

Image

Hi guys! Can I describe the kid's trousers as "a pair of trousers with ripped bottoms"?

Thanks a lot!

StevenLoan
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Re: Trousers

Post by trolley » Tue Aug 07, 2018 4:56 pm

Those are "chaps" (pronounced "shaps"). They are thick leather leg coverings, worn over trousers. They protect a horse-riders legs when riding through thick under-brush or to protect from injuries when roping cattle or horses. They are a pretty common part of a cowboy's attire and are often seen in western movies or at rodeos.
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Re: Trousers

Post by BonnieL » Tue Aug 07, 2018 5:51 pm

trolley wrote:
Tue Aug 07, 2018 4:56 pm
Those are "chaps" (pronounced "shaps").
Depends on where you are. I've only heard them pronounced like the person or chapped lips.
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Re: Trousers

Post by Erik_Kowal » Tue Aug 07, 2018 6:21 pm

The treatment given to the lower part of the chaps (which usually cover only the front part of the leg — something that is not obvious from the photo you have included here) is known as a fringe. They are intentional cuts, not accidental rips.

So you could describe the chaps as being fringed at the bottom or having a fringe at the bottom.

I would suppose that the fringe is not merely decorative, but has the practical purpose of helping the chaps to conform to the shape of the wearer's leg or footwear. Without the fringe, I suspect the chaps would also be more likely to catch or snag on things like the eyelets of the wearer's boots or their horse's stirrups, harness or other tack.
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Re: Trousers

Post by trolley » Tue Aug 07, 2018 7:07 pm

BonnieL wrote:
Tue Aug 07, 2018 5:51 pm
trolley wrote:
Tue Aug 07, 2018 4:56 pm
Those are "chaps" (pronounced "shaps").
Depends on where you are. I've only heard them pronounced like the person or chapped lips.
I always pronounced it as "ch" too but it seems I would often be corrected by someone "in the know". All the "horsey" people I know pronounce it with the "sh" sound. The word comes from the Spanish word "chaparro" which is a dwarf oak bush and the Spanish pronunciation sounds like Shaparro.
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Re: Trousers

Post by Stevenloan » Thu Aug 09, 2018 4:17 pm

I would like to thank you all very very much.

StevenLoan
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