umami

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umami

Post by Ken Greenwald » Wed Jul 04, 2018 10:05 pm

[[This is a corrected version of this posting. As Erik Kowal pointed out below the correct spelling for this taste sense is "umami" and not "unami."]]
<2018 “Scientists think they can reduce greenhouse gas emissions by tweaking the food that cows eat. A recent experiment from the University of California, Davis suggests that adding seaweed to cattle feed can dramatically decrease their emissions of the potent gas methane.
Livestock is a major source of greenhouse gases worldwide. About quarter of the methane emissions due to human activity in the U.S. can be chalked up to gas released from these animals, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Another crucial question that the team worried about is whether the seaweed diet would change the taste of the cows' milk. Even with a dramatic reduction in emissions, most people aren't looking for a salty umami twist in their milkshakes.”—NPR, 3 July>
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Dictionary.com

umami [oo-mah-mee] noun: A strong meaty taste imparted by glutamate and certain other amino acids: often considered to be one of the basic taste sensations along with sweet, sour, bitter, and salty. <This unsmoked, wet-cured ham is the sine qua non of Parisian butcher shops: a light, ephemeral meat, sweet but umami.>
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Oxford English Dictionary

umami noun: A category of taste corresponding to the ‘savoury’ flavour of free glutamates in various foods, especially protein-rich fermented and aged ones such as mature cheeses and soy sauce; specificly the flavour of monosodium glutamate. Also: monosodium glutamate itself.

Origin: A borrowing from Japanese. Etymon: Japanese umami.

Etymology: from Japanese umami deliciousness (1721 or earlier) from uma-, stem of umai delicious + -mi suffix forming abstract nouns from adjectives (but commonly written as if from -mi taste; from Middle Chinese).

Umami is sometimes described as a fifth basic taste alongside sweet, sour, salt, and bitter.
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Not to be confused with "Unami" 1) a member of a North American Indian people, one of the Delaware group. 2) The Eastern Algonquian language of the Unami, originally spoken in the middle and lower Delaware Valley.
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The following quotes are from archived sources:
<1969 “The subjects were requested to judge the taste and allocate score 10 into five component tastes, i.e., sweet, sour, salty, bitter, and umami (delicious), in proportion to their subject intensity.”—Japanese Psychology Research, volume 11, page 152/1>

<1979 “To the Japanese the ‘umami’ flavour is among the most essential. They explain it to Westerners as the taste of broth, of meat, of tuna and of seaweed.”—New Scientist, 3 May, page 361>

<2000 “Today's study in the journal Nature Neuroscience identifies the molecule on the tongue that responds to umami.”—Daily Telegraph (London), 25 January, Page

<2003 “Other foods with umami are naturally brewed soy sauce and fish sauce.”—Kitchen Hand by A. Telford, page 254>

<2007 “The earthy shiitake is known for umami-rich qualities -- the ways in which its flavor complements the basic tastes of sweet, sour, salty and bitter. ”—The Washington Post (D.C.), 14 February>

<2013 "Both the classic cold meat and and barbecued beef are incredibly moist umami bombs."—The Boston Globe (Boston Massachusetts), 2 January>

<2018 “. . . a reminder that when going meatless, it’s mushrooms that bring the umami. ”—The Herald (Glasgow, Scotland), 21 June>
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Ken Greenwald – July 4, 2018 [[updated July 5]]
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Re: unami

Post by trolley » Wed Jul 04, 2018 10:56 pm

That's curious. I've only ever seen (heard) the word as "umami". I'll admit I had never heard it until about 10 or 15 years ago, when I became more interested in cooking. The only definitions I can find for unami in OneLook is as a North American Native language. Maybe those quotes are just typos.
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Re: unami

Post by Ken Greenwald » Wed Jul 04, 2018 11:19 pm

John,

‘Unami’ with a capital “U” is listed in many dictionaries as the only definition of ‘unami.’ My Random House Webster’s Unabridged Dictionary, for example, lists the following when I type in ‘unami’:

Unami noun:

1. One of the two Algonquian languages of the Delaware peoples, originally spoken in central and southern New Jersey, eastern Pennsylvania, and northern Delaware.

2. A member of the Unami-speaking branch of the Delaware people.
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I don’t understand why because the taste meaning has been around for a long time.
Slipped through the cracks, I guess. :cry: (I slipped through the cracks - see correction)
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Ken – July 4, 2018
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Re: unami

Post by Erik_Kowal » Thu Jul 05, 2018 3:05 am

UNAMI refers to the Algonquian people or their language.

UMAMI refers to the taste category.

There is no overlap of meaning.
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Re: unami

Post by Bobinwales » Thu Jul 05, 2018 12:08 pm

In my bit of South Wales we have always kept the seaweed for ourselves, we would never share it with cattle!
This is laverbread. It is traditionally served with bacon and fried cockles for breakfast.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/ynysforga ... /lightbox/
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Re: unami

Post by tony h » Thu Jul 05, 2018 12:56 pm

Bobinwales wrote:
Thu Jul 05, 2018 12:08 pm
In my bit of South Wales we have always kept the seaweed for ourselves, we would never share it with cattle!
This is laverbread. It is traditionally served with bacon and fried cockles for breakfast.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/ynysforga ... /lightbox/
Now the scientist Ken quotes is called Davis. A Welsh name if ever I heard one. Thinking about the statement "Scientists think they can reduce greenhouse gas emissions by tweaking the food that cows eat. A recent experiment from the University of California, Davis suggests that adding seaweed to cattle feed can dramatically decrease their emissions of the potent gas methane. "

I am wondering whether, when growing up in Wales, Davis noticed the greenhouses gases being emitted from houses where laverbread was not eaten and his own gassless household. Maybe this gave him the idea with cows.
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Re: unami

Post by BonnieL » Thu Jul 05, 2018 3:37 pm

tony h wrote:
Thu Jul 05, 2018 12:56 pm
Bobinwales wrote:
Thu Jul 05, 2018 12:08 pm

Now the scientist Ken quotes is called Davis. A Welsh name if ever I heard one. Thinking about the statement "Scientists think they can reduce greenhouse gas emissions by tweaking the food that cows eat. A recent experiment from the University of California, Davis suggests that adding seaweed to cattle feed can dramatically decrease their emissions of the potent gas methane. "
Davis refers to the city of Davis in California. My grandfather went to the University of California, Davis, in the early 1900's when it was still a school of agriculture. He majored in chickens. Something I'm still interested in, tho I get attached to the chickens - not a good thing for anyone going into the chicken business. :wink:
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Re: unami

Post by tony h » Thu Jul 05, 2018 5:48 pm

BonnieL wrote:
Thu Jul 05, 2018 3:37 pm
Davis refers to the city of Davis in California. My grandfather went to the University of California, Davis, in the early 1900's when it was still a school of agriculture. He majored in chickens. Something I'm still interested in, tho I get attached to the chickens - not a good thing for anyone going into the chicken business. :wink:
Thank you. Although I don't imagine animal science professor and Sesnon Endowed Chair Ermias Kebreab having laver bread and cockles for breakfast.

https://www.ucdavis.edu/news/can-seawee ... iry-farms/
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Re: unami

Post by Bobinwales » Sat Jul 07, 2018 11:41 pm

tony h wrote:
Thu Jul 05, 2018 12:56 pm
Now the scientist Ken quotes is called Davis. A Welsh name if ever I heard one.
I hate being pedantic but DAVIES is the more usual Welsh spelling and in Welsh it is DAFIS. I admit that we do occasionally come across a Davis but it is quite rare. Spencer Davis of 60s fame, changed the spelling of his name from Davies to Davis because people were mispronouncing it as DAVE-EES.
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Re: unami

Post by tony h » Sun Jul 08, 2018 12:51 pm

Bobinwales wrote:
Sat Jul 07, 2018 11:41 pm
I hate being pedantic but ...
I thought enjoying being pedantic is almost a qualification for membership of this site.
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Re: unami

Post by Bobinwales » Sun Jul 08, 2018 9:55 pm

tony h wrote:
Sun Jul 08, 2018 12:51 pm
I thought enjoying being pedantic is almost a qualification for membership of this site.
True, very true.
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Re: unami

Post by tony h » Mon Jul 09, 2018 9:50 am

Bobinwales wrote:
Sun Jul 08, 2018 9:55 pm
tony h wrote:
Sun Jul 08, 2018 12:51 pm
I thought enjoying being pedantic is almost a qualification for membership of this site.
True, very true.
P.S. I appreciated your correction even though it destroyed the basis for my attempt at entertainment with a humorous (in my opinion) musing.
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Re: umami

Post by Erik_Kowal » Mon Jul 09, 2018 10:20 am

I feel it should be pointed out that qualifying the adjective 'true' with 'very' adds nothing to its meaning.

:D
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Re: umami

Post by tony h » Mon Jul 09, 2018 1:35 pm

Erik_Kowal wrote:
Mon Jul 09, 2018 10:20 am
I feel it should be pointed out that qualifying the adjective 'true' with 'very' adds nothing to its meaning.

:D
I refer my learned friend to a another case from which some parallels may be drawn: http://www.wordwizard.com/phpbb3/viewto ... 135#p83577

:lol:
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End of topic.
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