to pay and watch

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to pay and watch

Post by azz » Sun May 13, 2018 6:51 am

Are these sentences grammatical?
Do they make sense?

a. These are some of our favorite stand-ups to watch. And now we are meeting them in person.
b. These are some of our favorite stand-ups to pay and watch. And now we are meeting them in person.


(b) is a bit jocular. We normally love to pay and watch these people, but now we are meeting them and talking to them for free!

Many thanks.
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Re: to pay and watch

Post by Bobinwales » Sun May 13, 2018 7:25 pm

They are a bit clumsy.
We normally have to pay to see these stand-ups; but now we are meeting some of our favourites in person.
.
Notice the UK spelling of "favourites".
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Signature: All those years gone to waist!
Bob in Wales

Re: to pay and watch

Post by trolley » Sun May 13, 2018 11:24 pm

This had me wonder where the idea that you cannot begin a sentence with a conjuction ever came from. This was drilled into my head as one of the unbreakable rules. Years later, I discovered that this was not the case but, even still, when I see a sentence begin with "and"...it gives me pause.
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End of topic.
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