a van for carrying

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a van for carrying

Post by navi » Tue May 08, 2018 6:58 am

Which are correct:

1) They gave me this van to carry my belongings in.
2) They gave me this van to carry my belongings.
3) They gave me this van for carrying my belongings.
4) They gave me this van for carrying my belongings in.

5) They gave me a van to carry my belongings in.
6) They gave me a van to carry my belongings.
7) They gave me a van for carrying my belongings.
8 ) They gave me a van for carrying my belongings in.

Gratefully,
Navi
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Re: a van for carrying

Post by tony h » Tue May 08, 2018 9:34 am

They gave me a/this van in which to carry my belongings ;)
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I'm puzzled therefore I think.

Re: a van for carrying

Post by Erik_Kowal » Tue May 08, 2018 1:56 pm

The usual verbs to describe the moving of objects from one place to another using a vehicle or animal are move, transport, convey and shift, whereas 'carry' suggests they are being moved by hand.

Hence moving, transporting, conveying and shifting rather than 'carrying'.
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Re: a van for carrying

Post by Bobinwales » Tue May 08, 2018 10:50 pm

I remember the days when you would have been given a pantechnicon.
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Signature: All those years gone to waist!
Bob in Wales

Re: a van for carrying

Post by tony h » Wed May 09, 2018 11:13 am

Bobinwales wrote:
Tue May 08, 2018 10:50 pm
I remember the days when you would have been given a pantechnicon.
I always loved that word. I didn't know its origin. So I did whatwe do here ...

My dictionary defines it (first) as a furniture warehouse and (second) as a furniture van. The first surprised me.

Wikipedia has the full story:
The word "Pantechnicon" is an invented one, formed from the Greek pan ("all") and techne ("art"). It was originally the name of a large establishment in Motcomb Street, Belgravia, London, opened around 1830. It combined a picture gallery, a furniture shop, and the sale of carriages, while its southern half was a sizable warehouse for storing furniture and other items. Seth Smith (property developer)Seth Smith, originally from Wiltshire, was a builder in the early 19th century, and constructed much of the new housing in Belgravia[1], then a country area. Their clients required storage facilities and this was built on an awkward left-over triangular site with a Greek style Doric column façade, and called Pantechnicon, pseudo-Greek for "pertaining to all the arts or crafts".

Subsequently, special wagons were designed with sloping ramps to more easily load furniture, with the building name on the side. The very large, distinctive, and noticeable horse-drawn vans that were used to collect and deliver the customers' furniture came to be known as "Pantechnicon vans." From around 1900, the name was shortened to simply Pantechnicon. The Pantechnicon Ltd, a furniture storage and removal company, continued to trade until the 1970s.

The building was largely destroyed by fire in 1874, but the facade still exists and the usefulness of the vans was by then well established and they had been adopted by other firms. As of 2015 the façade and the building behind it has been leased by its owner, Grosvenor Estates, to Cubitt House, a company specializing in pubs and restaurants in the Belgravia area, and is to be redeveloped into a "food and retail emporium" over six floors, including a basement and a roof-terrace


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pantechnicon_van

An edit to include this wonderful photo: Image
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Re: a van for carrying

Post by BonnieL » Tue May 22, 2018 3:37 am

Thank you, Tony! I came across the word in a book last week & was too lazy to look it up. I was able to figure it out from the context, but it's nice to see the meaning & pictures pop up here. :)
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