Get out of Dodge

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Get out of Dodge

Post by Affe » Fri Sep 22, 2006 7:07 pm

If this is posted somewhere else I apologize I couldn't find it from the search. I'm wondering if anyone knows the origin of the phrase "Time to get out of Dodge." I also often hear it said "Time to get the heck out of Dodge" It is generally used in the context of it is time to go or past time to go. Also when one needs to leave quickly. Any help would be appreciated. Thank you.
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Signature: Drew
Kalamazoo, MI

Get out of Dodge

Post by Shelley » Fri Sep 22, 2006 7:56 pm

It might have to do with the name of Marshall Dillon's town, Dodge City. On the 50's western, Gunsmoke, the Marshall, Miss Kitty and their pal Festus, plus a few other characters lived in Dodge City. When some bad guys came into town, Marshall Dillon would lean on 'em, and they'd look at eachother and say, "Let's get the hell outta Dodge!" Or something like that there . . .
For more about this classic American TV show: http://imdb.com/title/tt0047736/
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Get out of Dodge

Post by Wizard of Oz » Fri Sep 22, 2006 10:15 pm

.. *gets beer, settles back* .. yep Marshall Ken should be pokin on past any secon now .. aridin inta Dodge City to find out all there is ta knows about gittin outa that there town .. yeeeeha ..

WoZ
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Signature: "The question is," said Alice, "whether you can make words mean so many different things."

Get out of Dodge

Post by Ken Greenwald » Sat Sep 23, 2006 5:54 am

Drew, Let’s thank Wiz for his intro and I’m sure we’re all appreciative of his contribution to the topic – I don’t know what we do without him. (<:)

Oxford Dictionary of Allusions

DODGE CITY: Dodge City, in Kansas, USA, had a reputation as a rowdy frontier town until Wyatt Earp became chief deputy marshal in 1876 and introduced order. Dodge City can be alluded to as a place characterized by lawless or unregulated conflict, particularly involving gun fights.
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Random House Word Maven

GET OUT OF DODGE or GET THE HELL/HECK OUT OF DODGE: The phrase is a reference to Dodge City, Kansas. Dodge City was the setting of innumerable Wild-West movies and books and, most prominently, the CBS-TV series Gunsmoke, which ran from 1955 to 1975. After being defeated by the good guys, badmen might stereotypically be commanded to ‘get the hell out of Dodge.’ The transferred sense, 'to leave or get out (of anywhere) at once', arose in the mid-1960s, when it was recorded in the slang of youth gangs, and became common by the 1970s.
<1960 “‘Mister,’ said Matt Dillon, ‘you better GET OUT OF DODGE.’”—‘Los Angeles Times,’ 10 March, page B5>

<1980 “‘Two white people staggered out of the car,’ he said. ‘One was waving his hands like he was pleading. About 10 to 15 people started throwing things at them. Me and my buddy knew it was time to GET OUT OF DODGE and we left.’”—‘New York Times,’ 1 June, page 26>

<1981 “An ‘off duty’ gun. It was the first thing they all did twenty-two years ago, those slick-sleeved, scrubbed, and hard-muscled rookies with their big eyes and crewcuts and bags full of hope. They ran out and bought ‘off-duty’ guns. DODGE CITY. The John Wayne syndrome.”—‘The Glitter Dome’ by Joseph Wambaugh>

<1991 “Pennsylvania's voters are as taxophobic as their neighbors in New Jersey. There the voters used state legislative elections to send a message to Democratic Gov. Jim Florio, author of the largest tax increase in state history. The message was, approximately: ‘GET OUT OF DODGE!”—‘Newsweek,’ 18 November>

<1995 “Rita and I followed him [[the sheriff]] into the office, Rita whispering to me, ‘Where’s his gun?’ Sheriff Eagles put his fists on his waste and turned to Rita. ‘What do I need a gun for?’ ‘I thought lawmen always carried guns,’ Rita said. ‘This is Harveyville, Kansas, not DODGE CITY, . . .”—‘The Persian Pickle Club’ [[placed in the 1930s]] by Sandra Dallas, page 111>

<2003 “Who says the prime-time Western is dead? Monday night, President Bush brought the moribund genre back to life, with a brief speech that promised war in as little as two days if Saddam Hussein didn't GET OUT OF DODGE.”—‘Time Magazine,’ 18 March>

<2005 “More than a few Bush Administration officials hoped Chalabi would quickly take control in Baghdad after Saddam was deposed, and allow the U.S. to GET OUT OF DODGE within months.”—‘Time Magazine,’ 22 October>
Ken G – September 22, 2006
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Get out of Dodge

Post by Affe » Mon Sep 25, 2006 7:20 pm

Thanks everyone. Very helpful.
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Signature: Drew
Kalamazoo, MI

Get out of Dodge

Post by Mississippi Kid » Sun Oct 08, 2006 2:06 am

This phrase received huge popularity from the Lynyrd Skynyrd album "One More From the Road." Near the end of the song "Gimme Three Steps," which is a song about how he got in trouble with a jealous boyfriend for dancing with his girl, vocalist Ronnie Van Zant exclaims, "I think I'm gonna get the hell out of Dodge." Since then people have used variations of that phrase anytime it's time to get away from potential trouble -- or when it's time to leave someplace in general.

So, the popularity of this phrase (along with "What song is it you wanna hear?") can be attributed to the immortal Ronnie Van Zant. What I'm sure makes Ronnie turn in his grave, however, is the answer to that question....an answer that morons everywhere insist on shouting out at everything from a Barry Manilow to a Britney Spears to a garage band's concert at local tavern: "Freebird!"
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