He ~ed her

Discuss word origins and meanings.

He ~ed her

Post by dalehileman » Sun Jan 08, 2006 1:33 am

An obscure transitive verb meaning to fuck, but it is not slang
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He ~ed her

Post by minjeff » Sun Jan 08, 2006 1:50 am

I'd say "screwed" or "humped", although "conjugated" works according to its definition. "Boffed" too seems a nice fit. "Conjugated" is a transitive verb according to dictionary.com, however it just doesn't sound right on the ears. "Screwed" and "Humped" sound a little like slang and arn't too obscure like you asked, so I hope that "boffed" is you word.
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He ~ed her

Post by elbucho » Sun Jan 08, 2006 3:03 pm

I believe the word you were looking for is: Penetrated
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He ~ed her

Post by elbucho » Sun Jan 08, 2006 3:04 pm

Of course, if you were looking for something more descriptive: Ravaged
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He ~ed her

Post by Phil White » Sun Jan 08, 2006 4:26 pm

Tumble (Shakespeare)
Know (Bible)
Cover (Breeders' Weekly)
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He ~ed her

Post by dalehileman » Sun Jan 08, 2006 6:16 pm

Jeff: "Boff" is slang

Elb: "Penetrate" comes close but doesn't make the grade because it doesn't entail the object nor the opening. "Ravage," or "ravish" means to rape

Phil: "Know" and "cover" qualify though hardly specific to human intercourse (tho I suppose you could argue that neither is "fuck"). "Tumble" isn't generally recognized as a transitive verb in this application but you're invited to defend it

So far Phil takes home the cake, while Elb gets honorable mention--Thanks all

...while it might be interesting to speculate upon the dearth of synonyms. Perhaps the purveyors of "Proper English" would argue that a transitive verb implies an action upon an object; so a transitive verb in this case is demeaning or sexist
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He ~ed her

Post by Erik_Kowal » Sun Jan 08, 2006 6:44 pm

Actually, Dale, most slang synonyms that mean "to have sex with" can be used both transitively and intransitively, and with both male and female sexes as either subject or object:

"They fucked all night."

"He fucked her silly."

"She fucked him silly."

My opinion is that the use of the transitive verb here is not "demeaning or sexist", but is informative about who the instigator of the sexual act is, or who its most active participant is.

One could argue that the use of farmyard terminology such as 'mount' or 'tup' is more liable to be demeaning, but since the precise context in which it is used would be highly relevant for making an accurate assessment of a particular instance, I would never assert this observation as being correct in all cases.

There is an additional difficulty with your proposal of a demeaning connotation, which is that it contains the implication of an element of humiliation, subservience or compulsion in being the object of another's sexual appetite. While this may of course sometimes be so, it would hardly seem to apply in what I presume is the majority of cases, where the sex is mutually agreed upon and is equally desired by both (or all) the parties involved, even when only one of them leads the action.

There is also the additional complication of the existence of traditional sex roles in a given culture in which one or other sex is expected to take the lead, and the other sex is expected by implication to be submissive. Which takes the discussion into an altogether broader realm...
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He ~ed her

Post by Ken Greenwald » Sun Jan 08, 2006 6:59 pm

Dale, It’s not that obscure, but many dictionaries list the nonslang verb BED, hence BEDDED, as a transitive verb meaning “to have sexual intercourse with,” “to have coition” (see Merriam-Webster Online, Random House Unabridged, Merriam-Webster’s Unabridged, . . .)
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He ~ed her

Post by dalehileman » Sun Jan 08, 2006 9:25 pm

Erik, thank you that was a fabulous pun. True, I have heard "intercourse" used transitively (Well, did you intercourse her last night?) though not in Random Unabridged. But Ken, above, just took the lead, as "BED" is the best yet. It's transitive, specific, Standard Engish, and largely non-sexist

The prim and Politically Correct Professor of psychology will hold that you shouldn't think of sex as doing something to somebody, as implied by the transitive, vs the intransitive which implies a participation of equality

If we accept obscure or slangy usage, besides "know" and "cover" our Thesaurus offers also "enjoy," "have," "do." However, if you were compiling a dictionary, say, there's no standard synonym that can be used to unambiguously define "fuck" because "to bed" is two words
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He ~ed her

Post by Erik_Kowal » Mon Jan 09, 2006 5:22 am

Dale, I will accept your compliment with a no-pun mind.
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He ~ed her

Post by dalehileman » Mon Jan 09, 2006 8:56 pm

Erik, excellent poly-pun
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He ~ed her

Post by JANE DOErell » Mon Jan 09, 2006 9:23 pm

Back to "He ~ed her", in an old black and white repeat on TV last night someone said "He made her" referencing fornication.
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He ~ed her

Post by Ken Greenwald » Tue Jan 10, 2006 6:42 pm

Jane, The sexual MAKE is considered slang. Here are some takes on the meaning of the expression:

MAKE [1910] verb: slang (originally. U.S.). To be successful in (especially sexual) advances to; to win the affection of; specifically to persuade (a person) to consent to sexual intercourse; to seduce. [Oxford English Dictionary]

MAKE [1910] verb: 1) To strike up an acquaintance with (a person of the opposite sex) for the purpose of romantic or sexual involvement. 2) To seduce; (also to copulate with) [Historical Dictionary of American Slang]

MAKE [1910s and still in use] (U.S.) verb: To seduce, to have sexual intercourse with. (cf. ‘put the make on') [Cassell’s Dictionary of Slang]

MAKE [1942] Originally U.S. verb: Applied to a sexual conquest, especially in an easily seduced woman. [Oxford Dictionary of Slang]

MAKE [by 1918] verb: To do the sex act with; = lay, screw [Chapman’s Dictionary of American Slang]
<1910 “Say the swellest broiler just passed here. Let’s go over . . . and make her.”—in ‘New York Evening Journal.’ T. A. Dorgan, 12 August, page 8>

<1918 “Look at that big stiff trying to MAKE that dame.”—‘OED Supplement’

<1940 “Them rich dames are easier to MAKE than paper dolls.”—‘Farewell, My Lovely’ by R. Chandler, page 197>

<1966-67 “The broad was still on the bed wondering if I was going to MAKE her again.”—‘Mean Streets’ by P. Thomas, page 185>

<1977 “A considerable degree of manipulativeness was condoned in the behavior of a young man trying to ‘MAKE’ a young woman.”—‘What You Still Don’t Know About Male Sexuality’ by Barry McCarthy>
I don’t know how popular an expression MAKE is today, but it seems like it has been passing into ‘passéiveness’ for a very long time. Same goes for the phrases containing it: ON THE MAKE, seeking amorous or sexual activity; an EASY MAKE, a woman who can be easily seduced, ‘an easy lay’; PUT THE MAKE ON (someone), to make sexual advances
<1929 “He’s one of these guy’s who’s ON THE MAKE for every dame on the lot.” Ibid. “Of course he’s ON THE MAKE, all men are.”—‘Hollywood Girl’ by McEvoy, pages 16 & 42>

<1942 “Woman of easy morals . . . EASY MAKE . . . loose woman [etc.]”—‘American Thesaurus of Slang’ by Berrey & van den Bark, page 395>

<1953 “If Katherine had been just a pair of hot pants ON THE MAKE.”—‘Kingpin’ by Wicker, page 110>

<1956 "Here was this practically a seduction, she was really THROWING THE MAKE ON HIM."—'Chocolates for Breakfast' by P. Moore, xix. page 198>

<1970 "As a goof, Jumper PUTS THE MAKE ON a whore at 59th Street, but she turns away." 'New York Times,' 28 November, page SM28>

<1978 "His girl—the one he has been trying unsuccessfully to PUT THE MAKE ON—hears the longing and the edge of desperation in his voice and kisses him on the cheek. 'Time Magazine,' 3 April>

<1993 A “PUT THE MAKE ON YOU, did she, Joe? I should have warned you. Past a certain blood alcohol level Yolie gets snuggly." 'Hill Towns' (1994), by A. R. Siddons, vii. page 145>
Note: Under the heading MAKE, in his Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English, Eric Partridge uses the interesting intransitive verb COÏT: “Hence to COÏT with (a girl).” “SLIP (HER) A LENGTH [[penis]]: To COÏT with a woman.” He is using COÏT as the verb form of the act of ‘coitus,’ but no standard or slang dictionary that I checked lists it. However I did find it defined – minus the umlaut – at http://www.sex-lexis.com for whatever that is worth: COÏT: 1) short for coition and coitus, to perform copulation. 2) Of a male, to copulate with a woman.
Hmm. But what’s with the umlaut? Is it perhaps a foreign word?
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He ~ed her

Post by Erik_Kowal » Tue Jan 10, 2006 7:18 pm

It's not an umlaut in this instance, it's a diaeresis (or dieresis in US spelling). Its purpose is to indicate that two adjacent vowels (which might otherwise be taken as being a single syllable) are to be pronounced separately. Examples are 'naïve', 'coöperate', 'Citroën', 'faïence'. The 'cöit' example is the first time that I've seen it placed over the first vowel instead of the second. I suspect Partridge was using it incorrectly, and he should have written 'coït'.
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He ~ed her

Post by Ken Greenwald » Tue Jan 10, 2006 7:38 pm

Erik, Thanks. And it wasn't Partridge who was wrong, it was me. The dieresis should have been over the 'I' and I've corrected it in the above.

Ken - January 10, 2006
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