Long jacket

This is the place to post questions and discussions on usage and style. The members of the Wordwizard Clubhouse will also often be able to help you to formulate that difficult letter.
Post Reply

Long jacket

Post by Stevenloan » Wed Dec 13, 2017 5:06 pm

Hi you guys! What do you call the kind of long jacket that David Beckham wears in the following link (the first picture)?

https://www.thesun.co.uk/tvandshowbiz/3 ... s-clothes/

Thanks very much!

StevenLoan
Post actions:

Re: Long jacket

Post by Erik_Kowal » Wed Dec 13, 2017 5:29 pm

Post actions:

Re: Long jacket

Post by BonnieL » Thu Dec 14, 2017 12:57 am

Aren't trench coats usually belted? I can't see if his has a belt or not. I would think it's a double breasted coat. Could be wrong, tho - it's happened before. :)
Post actions:

Re: Long jacket

Post by Bobinwales » Thu Dec 14, 2017 1:11 am

My trench coat looks like this. I wish I did.
Image
I would have called Beckham's a great coat,
Image
Post actions:
Signature: All those years gone to waist!
Bob in Wales

Re: Long jacket

Post by Erik_Kowal » Thu Dec 14, 2017 2:04 am

There's a lot of overlap between a trench coat, a greatcoat and an overcoat. Partly because garment design keeps changing and evolving, there's no consensus regarding the exact definition of each of these descriptors.

Based purely on the references I've cited (including the images attached to the articles), a belt doesn't appear to be mandatory for any of these coats to be included in the sub-categories I've mentioned.
Post actions:

Re: Long jacket

Post by tony h » Thu Dec 14, 2017 9:44 am

This is the coat ... https://www.kentandcurwen.com/military- ... em10a.html

The manufacturer calls it a Military Greatcoat.

The main difference between a greatcoat and a trenchcoat is that a trenchcoat is designed to be substantially more waterproof than a greatcoat by using waterproof materials such as rubberised materials such as MacIntosh and design features such as Raglan sleeves and closures around the wrists and neck. The Greatcoat used the natural properties of wool to protect from the rain, and a shoulder cape - although the shoulder cape is often missing from items described as a Greatcoat. I think my Grandfather would have described it as a "warm" as allowed by the British Army but, although technically more accurate, the name Warm for coats seems to have been absorbed into the term Greatcoat.
Post actions:
Signature: tony

I'm puzzled therefore I think.

Re: Long jacket

Post by Stevenloan » Thu Dec 14, 2017 1:38 pm

Erik, BonnieL, Bob and tony h : Thank you all very very much. I really appreciate it.
Post actions:

End of topic.
Post Reply