Never there enough

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Never there enough

Post by Stevenloan » Sat Oct 21, 2017 3:39 pm

"Nottingham, which is home. I’m never there enough to get bored with it. I also love walking my dogs around the surrounding countryside. My local pub is the Larwood & Voce, right next to the cricket ground." Stuart Broad, cricketer.

Hi you guys! Does "I'm never there enough to get bored with it" in this case mean "I've been there so many times and it has never bored me"?

Your answers would be greatly appreciated.

StevenLoan
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Re: Never there enough

Post by tony h » Sat Oct 21, 2017 10:39 pm

It suggests that there is not a lot to do. Enough to be enjoyable in short bursts but not enough to keep you entertained longer term.

Thus : I’m never there enough to get bored with it.

http://www.molefacepubcompany.co.uk/the ... -voce.html
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With the right context almost anything can sound appropriate.

Re: Never there enough

Post by Erik_Kowal » Sun Oct 22, 2017 2:19 am

I might agree more with Tony if it was not for the fact that the cricketer has mentioned four things that appeal to him in the locality (the fact that Nottingham is his home territory, and that it also encompasses his local pub, the cricket ground and the nearby countryside). Given that it's his home turf (whose interest value he might therefore easily have exhausted by now), I'd be inclined to assume he means that there's still always more than enough things to do or enjoy to keep him occupied.

Will Bob soon be paying a visit there to check out the Larwood & Voce, I wonder?
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Re: Never there enough

Post by tony h » Sun Oct 22, 2017 4:56 pm

Erik_Kowal wrote:
Sun Oct 22, 2017 2:19 am

Will Bob soon be paying a visit there to check out the Larwood & Voce, I wonder?
I used to row on the river just over from the L&V and I would suggest there are other Nottingham pubs which would more easily justify a long range visit. Unless, of course, spotting cricketers is your thing to do.
http://songsofinsects.com/crickets/spot ... nd-cricket
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Re: Never there enough

Post by Stevenloan » Mon Oct 23, 2017 6:06 am

tony h and Erik : Thank you two so so much.
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Re: Never there enough

Post by Bobinwales » Mon Oct 23, 2017 5:49 pm

Erik_Kowal wrote:
Sun Oct 22, 2017 2:19 am
Will Bob soon be paying a visit there to check out the Larwood & Voce, I wonder?
I haven't been to Nottingham for years, but did investigate some pubs including Ye Olde Trip to Jerusalem during my last trip. I was there in a band playing the music for a Welsh clog dancing team. We went into the pub for lunch with our instruments and were asked by a couple of the locals if we were going to play, we did and so I can claim to have played in a pub that may well be the oldest in England. And I did have a pint!
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Signature: All those years gone to waist!
Bob in Wales

Re: Never there enough

Post by tony h » Tue Oct 24, 2017 8:40 am

I may have been listening! There are a lot of musical events that happen there both impromptu and promptu (is that a word?).
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Re: Never there enough

Post by Erik_Kowal » Tue Oct 24, 2017 1:24 pm

Tony, your comment PROMPTED me to look up the etymology of that rather curious-looking impromptu.

According to Online Etymology Dictionary, the 'im-' element in impromptu is not a prefix of negation:

1660s, from French impromptu (1650s), from Latin in promptu "in readiness," from assimilated form of in- "into, in, on, upon" (from PIE root *en "in") + promptu, ablative of promptus "ready, prepared; set forth, brought forward," from past participle of promere "to bring out," from pro "before, forward, for" (see pro-) + emere "to obtain" (see exempt (adj.)). From 1764 as an adjective; as a noun from 1680s.
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Re: Never there enough

Post by tony h » Wed Oct 25, 2017 2:11 pm

Erik, thank you. My brain is rather befuddled from a rather literal brainstorm yesterday but, in my reading of it, it does rather suggest that impromptu is a case of the wrong word I the wrong place.
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End of topic.
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