Sounds like a plan

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Sounds like a plan

Post by HANGNAM » Mon Nov 10, 2008 5:19 pm

Mark: The only reason I want to see this movie is I have seen the previous five.
Betty: True. Ok. Let's see it this Saturday.
Mark: How about we hook up for lunch at 12, and then go see it afterwards.
Betty: Sounds like a plan. Let's meet in front of ABC bookstore at 12.

- In my opinion I think "How about HOOKING UP for lunch........" is better, right? and BTW "Sounds like a plan" means "sounds like a good idea", right? :)

Thanks a million!

HANGNAM
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Re: Sounds like a plan

Post by Bobinwales » Mon Nov 10, 2008 5:50 pm

I don't like hook or hooking up at all. "Why don't we meet?" or "How about meeting" is much better.

"Sounds like a plan" means what you think it means, but I wouldn't use the expression.

Now, Hangnam, I think I know you pretty well by now, I really admire what you are doing and am full of admiration at your excellent efforts in learning this very difficult language of ours, but you really don't have to thank us a million times every time. A simple "Thanks " is really sufficient.

I hope I haven't offended you.
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Re: Sounds like a plan

Post by russcable » Mon Nov 10, 2008 6:03 pm

I'm not entirely sure why Betty thinks Mark's opinion is "true", but I suppose someone might say that.

"hook up" used to mean just meet or get together, but it's use to mean "casual sex encounter" has become more and more prevalent to the point that it's hard to use it around young people without them taking it the wrong way. "Let's hook up at noon." is likely to cause teenagers to giggle.

"Sounds like a plan" means the proposed schedule seems like a series of steps to accomplish the goal that will work well - i.e. a good plan. Not all ideas are plans.
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Re: Sounds like a plan

Post by Shelley » Mon Nov 10, 2008 10:16 pm

I agree: "hook up" or "hooking up" means have/having sex -- at least for the time being. I'm sure that will change before too long, but for now, you may want to avoid it, Hangnam, unless, of course, maybe their idea is to hook up for lunch at noon!

"Sounds like a plan" is used to express enthusiastic agreement without committing oneself emotionally. It says, "I want to do that, and I may even enjoy it, but I'm way too cool to commit to liking the idea or, on the other hand, to rejecting it and therefore having to come up with some other plan. As a reformed slacker, I know that having a plan is better than not having one so, for the moment, we can back away from the existential abyss . . . "
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Re: Sounds like a plan

Post by Bobinwales » Tue Nov 11, 2008 10:16 am

Shelley wrote:"hook up" or "hooking up" means have/having sex
I didn't know that. Has the expression been around long?
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Re: Sounds like a plan

Post by PhilHunt » Tue Nov 11, 2008 11:25 am

'Sound like a plan' is a piece of slacker generation slang. I haven't heard it since the late 90's. The last time was on the Dinosaur Jnr album Greenmind. It's a 20 C. artifact. I would suggest not using it Hang. 'Sound good', 'Sounds like a good idea', 'Good idea', would all work well in this context and be universally understood.

In English grammar teaching we would teach 'What about hooking up' because the verb follows from a preposition. 'What about...' is used to make a suggested activity and it is usually implied that the speaker and the listener are both going to take part in the activity; for this reason I would say 'What about we...' is unnecessary.
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Re: Sounds like a plan

Post by Phil White » Tue Nov 11, 2008 11:02 pm

As far as the grammar behind your question is concerned (and avoiding "hook up"), "how about meeting up" is US or British colloquial style. To my ears, "how about we meet up" is US colloquial style. I don't think you'd often hear it in the UK.
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Re: Sounds like a plan

Post by Erik_Kowal » Wed Nov 12, 2008 1:15 am

Alternatively, try "Let's meet up" or "Let's get together".

The non-committal nature of "Sounds like a plan" reminds me of a story that the late British-American journalist Alistair Cooke once related.

He explained that after his own children and their friends had all grown up and paired off and started having children of their own, he would invariably be invited to the baptisms and christenings of their new-born offspring. He did not wish to offend the proud parents by uttering a less-than-enthusiastic comment when yet another interchangeable-looking and purple-faced screaming infant was thrust under his nose, but neither did he wish to tell an outright lie. He therefore he devised an all-purpose response that was admirably well suited to every situation:

"My! That is a baby!"

The same baby formula has served me equally well more than once.
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Re: Sounds like a plan

Post by Phil White » Wed Nov 12, 2008 9:46 am

This dialogue is recorded on the site it came from:
http://www.talkenglish.com/LessonPractice.aspx?ALID=559
(dialogue 4)

Apart from the fact that it is read from a script and sounds stilted, I'm not entirely convinced that the readers are actually native US speakers. But then again, the company is based in Seattle, so what can you expect.

Their other pages are also not examples of enviable prose:
http://www.talkenglish.com/Page.aspx?pg=CONTACT.aspx
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Re: Sounds like a plan

Post by Erik_Kowal » Wed Nov 12, 2008 10:50 am

I've had a look both at those pages and at some others on the Talkenglish site, and I came to a similar conclusion to Phil's. The text of the dialogues has clearly not been subjected to validation or proofreading, and even the site's own functional language (e.g. instructions, descriptions of lessons etc.) is full of mistakes.

I think that all learners of English need to ask themselves whether the fact that the lessons on this site are free outweighs the fact that their content is unreliable and often misleading.
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Re: Sounds like a plan

Post by russcable » Wed Nov 12, 2008 3:40 pm

Phil White wrote:I'm not entirely convinced that the readers are actually native US speakers. But then again, the company is based in Seattle, so what can you expect.
A is pretty obviously Indian and trying to cover it up while B may possibly be Canadian (and stoned). Particularly the rising inflection? on the word lunch? in the middle of a sentence? which isn't a question? (Or possibly he's, like, a Valley Girl?, but he's from a really cool part of Encino? so it's okay.)
Nit: "Rocky six" - the sixth film in this series is technically not numbered, it's called "Rocky Balboa", but even so it should be written Rocky VI or Rocky 6 (or at least Rocky Six).
The girl in 3 is probably Chinese or Korean. She wants to go to a Korean movie Shiri or Swiri I've never heard of and pronounces it like Sheedy or Shitty which I'm guessing is the correct Chinese pronunciation.
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Re: Sounds like a plan

Post by trolley » Wed Nov 12, 2008 4:59 pm

I think the audio is performed by the "teachers", none of whom seem to be native speakers. I think we've discovered where Hangnam is getting some of his material. BTW... Canadians don't have accents. Everyone else does.
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Re: Sounds like a plan

Post by russcable » Wed Nov 12, 2008 5:59 pm

Bobinwales wrote:
Shelley wrote:"hook up" or "hooking up" means have/having sex
I didn't know that. Has the expression been around long?
Not sure, but I remember an incident in 2003 that where a 50-ish relative told her teen daughter that she should hook up with her friend that resulted in much eye-rolling. I'm guessing the pure sexual meaning developed in the 90's with the "get together" meaning much older (fairly obviously development from the connect/attach meaning - hook up the stereo, hook up the speakers, does the campsite have trailer hook-ups?)

Coincidentally, I watched a 2007 movie about college age people where one character said something like "I promised myself if I ever met the author of that blog that I would hook up with him." and obviously meant "have sex".
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Re: Sounds like a plan

Post by Wizard of Oz » Thu Nov 13, 2008 12:42 am

PhilH said:

'Sound like a plan' is a piece of slacker generation slang. I haven't heard it since the late 90's. The last time was on the Dinosaur Jnr album Greenmind. It's a 20 C. artifact. I would suggest not using it Hang. 'Sound good', 'Sounds like a good idea', 'Good idea', would all work well in this context and be universally understood.
.. Phil why do attempt to speak for the world ?? .. Hang is getting a rounded experience .. if he came to Aus he would hear the expression sounds like a plan/what's the plan quite often .. but then we must be a nation of slackers frozen in the last century .. and Hang go for it mate, it is a very usable expression ..

WoZ of the slacker generation .. (whatever that is)
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Re: Sounds like a plan

Post by Tony Farg » Thu Nov 13, 2008 9:42 am

Its a generation which doesn't fit as tightly, obviously.
And I might say "sounds like a plan" I think, but would do so with the intention of sounding like someone in a film.
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