minging

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minging

Post by Archived Topic » Sun Dec 19, 2004 12:07 am

Evidently undergoing metamorphosis. A speech is delivered in a ~ way. As far as I can tell, it once meant mincing, ie, either being chopped up or done delicately (affectedly). However, it is rapidly coming to mean disgusting. Especially I'm interested in learning whether the intended meaning depends on how your pronounce it
Submitted by dale hileman (Apple Valley, CA - U.S.A.)
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Post by Archived Reply » Sun Dec 19, 2004 12:21 am

Dale, As far as I can tell you should have no fear of anyone mistaking the common sense of ‘minging’ (1970, British slang for ‘stinking,’) with the purported ‘mincing’ sense. Also, this isn’t a hot new word of the variety you might be interested in for your dictionary – it’s been around in its present form for over 30 years.

I did find ‘mince’ mentioned in a few places supposedly traceable back to Webster’s 1913 dictionary, but I checked and it is not there. I don’t know where these few dictionaries dug up the idea that there was a connection to ‘mince,’ but no reputable sources that I checked said anything about that and I could not find any examples of it ever being used in that sense. So it appears to me that the ‘metamorphosis’ you speak of probably is not taking place, or if it is it is so esoteric that mere mortals would never notice it.

According to the sources that I checked MINGING first appeared in print in 1970 (see quote below) as a slang adjective, which was said to be originally Scottish. It means smelling bad, stinking, rank, but more generally, unpleasant, foul, or very drunk. It derives from the earlier Scottish noun MING (1923), which originally meant human excrement, but the usual sense of which has become ‘an unpleasant smell.’ Interestingly, MINGO was 18th to mid-19th century U.S. campus slang for ‘chamber pot,’ but it is uncertain if this was connected to the Scottish senses. MING also emerged in the 1970s as a verb meaning ‘to stink’ and a MINGER was one who literally or figuratively smelled. By 1995 a MINGER had become British slang for an ugly or unattractive person, especially, but not necessarily, a woman.

It should also be noted that ‘ming’ as a verb and a noun has several other meanings including ‘to mix or blend one thing with another,’ which is related to the word ‘mingle.’
<1923 “‘MENG,’ human excrement.”—‘Roxburghshire Word-Book’ by G. Watson, page 210>

<1970 “They were ‘MINGIN’ or ‘Pissed’—the state before complete drunkenness.”—‘Scottish Daily Express,’ 20 August, page 5>

<1985 “MINGIN means stinking but can also be used to describe anything bad: ‘We just came hame early cause the weather was MINGIN.’”—‘Patter’ by M. Munro, page 46>

<1989 “‘MINGING’. . . (‘Royal Marines’). Adopted Glaswegian slang word meaning drunk: ‘Jus' two beers an' the boy was MINGIN'.’ . . . It can also mean smelling strongly: ‘Three weeks ashore in the Falklands an' we was all MINGING pretty bad.’”—‘Jackspeak’ by R. Jolly, page 186>

<1997 “Daddy, a man swam the Danube for me! Are you proud? It's full of MINGING ex-communist pollution.”—‘These Demented Lands’ by A Warner, page 184>

<1998 “I open my overcoat and flap it to see if the MING is as steadily rancid as I imagine it to be.”—‘Filth’ by I Welsh, page 35>

<2000 “Sturrock called United's first half unacceptable. MINGING was nearer the mark.”—‘Scottish Sun’ (Super Goals), 21 February. page 3/2>
(Oxford English Dictionary, Cassell’s Dictionary of Slang)
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Ken G – December 28, 2004
Reply from Ken Greenwald (Fort Collins, CO - U.S.A.)
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minging

Post by Archived Reply » Sun Dec 19, 2004 12:34 am

Thank you Ken: Well, its "new" usage (1970) qualifies it. UD gives pron as rhyming with "singing." Any further comments on pron appreciated--dh
Reply from dale hileman (Apple Valley, CA - U.S.A.)
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Post by Archived Reply » Sun Dec 19, 2004 12:47 am

But I have run across a few other sources--evidently very old--relating to mincing, eg

Mince, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Minced}; p. pr. & vb. n.
{Minging}.] [AS. minsian to grow less, dwindle, fr. min
small; akin to G. minder less, Goth. minniza less, mins less,
adv., L. minor, adj. (cf. {Minor}); or more likely fr. F.
mincer to mince, prob. from (assumed) LL. minutiare. ????.
See {Minish}.]
1. To cut into very small pieces; to chop fine; to hash; as,
to mince meat. --Bacon.

Reply from dale hileman (Apple Valley, CA - U.S.A.)
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Post by Archived Reply » Sun Dec 19, 2004 1:01 am

Dale, For the record, what you have posted above is the Webster’s Dictionary (1913) definition of MINCE. It is NOT the definition of MINGING. As I stated in my above posting, that dictionary does not define ‘minging.’ What it actually does do is give ‘minging’ as a synonym of ‘mince’ followed by a big ‘question mark,’ which means that it is questionable whether it actually is a synonym. By doing the fairly thorough investigation of the derivation of ‘minging’ that I did above, I believe I have shown that ‘minging’ and ‘mince’ are probably not related, and that there was good reason that there was a question mark after ‘minging’ in 1913 – because that conjecture appears to be UNVERIFIABLE!

The reason you see this bogus definition/derivation plastered all over the online dictionaries (e.g. Dictionary.com, onlinedictionary.datasegment.com, etc.) is that those dictionaries do automated searches through all of the online digitized dictionaries, one of which is Webster’s 1913, without the intervention of a human brain and erroneously post any synonym they see as a definition without factoring such things as that critical question mark into their results. This error then propagated throughout the digital dictionaries giving the false impression that this is a bona fide definition/derivation of ‘minging’ – IT IS NOT and I believe that I have pretty well shown that in my above posting.

Ken – December 28, 2004
Reply from Ken Greenwald (Fort Collins, CO - U.S.A.)
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Post by Archived Reply » Sun Dec 19, 2004 1:14 am

Having a daughter of 24, I became familliar with this word via its common usage and meaning over the last decade. Whatever its original usage,in England at the moment it means anything that is unpleasant, disgusting,repulsive etc, rather than simply smelly.
Incidentally, there has been one reference to "minge" what has been completely overlooked...it's a common slang word for the female genitals.
Rob 29Dec04
Reply from Rob Masters (Thailand - Thailand)
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Post by Archived Reply » Sun Dec 19, 2004 1:27 am

Any chance the word Minge could be a derivitive of mange? That might account for it's usage as unpleasant or disgusting.

Pronunciation: 'mAnj
Function: noun
Etymology: alteration of Middle English manjewe, from Middle French mangene itching, from mangier to eat
: any of various persistent contagious skin diseases marked especially by eczematous inflammation and loss of hair, affecting domestic animals or sometimes humans, and caused by a minute parasitic mite -MW

JF 12/29/2004
Reply from Jeff Freeman (Orlando, FL - U.S.A.)
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Post by Archived Reply » Sun Dec 19, 2004 1:41 am

"Minge" = cunt.
Can't sidestep this one!
Rob 29dec04
Reply from Rob Masters (Thailand - Thailand)
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Post by Archived Reply » Sun Dec 19, 2004 1:54 am

Ken: I'm convinced, thank you

Any comments on pronunciation appreciated--dh
Reply from dale hileman (Apple Valley, CA - U.S.A.)
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