G-string

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G-string

Post by Archived Topic » Sat Dec 18, 2004 11:41 am

Is this of German origin or is it a slang term defining those wonderful undies(underpants /smalls /unmentionables / briefs ) that women (and possibly some men) wear to eliminate VPL (visible panty line)
Brian - Australia
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G-string

Post by Archived Reply » Sat Dec 18, 2004 11:54 am

Brian, This question was answered in the Clubhouse a long time ago and if you search under ‘g-string’ (posting # 832) using the ‘Word Search’ box at the top of the page you will find the basic answer. However, some newer sources provide a bit more detail.
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Facts on File Encyclopedia of Word and Phrase Origins

G-STRING [also GEE-STRING: Stripteasers, who sometimes call this a ‘gadget,’ aren’t responsible for the word. ‘G-string’ is an Americanism first used to describe an Indian’s loincloth or breechclout in the 19th century. It could be that some fiddler in the West compared the heaviest of violin strings, the G string, to the length of sinew or gut that Indians tied around their waists to hold up their breechclouts. But even the heaviest of violin strings wouldn’t really do the job. Perhaps the ‘g’ is just a euphemistic shortening of ‘groin,’ an indecent word at the time. The burlesque G-string is of course far smaller than the Indian variety and must have seemed even skimpier a century ago, considering the Brunhildian builds of yesterdays ecdysiasts. One burlesque company of the day proudly advertised “two tons of women” and had only 20 strippers.
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It was in 1936 that the ‘g-string’ first appeared in print (makes me wonder what strippers called it before that since above article refers to ‘a century ago’ – ~1900), that tiny garment worn by striptease dancers, consisting of a strip of cloth passing between the legs and supported by a waistband – and the old Indian usage was quickly obliterated. Wonder why that was!
<1878 “Around each boy's waist is the tight ‘GEESTRING’, from which a single strip of cloth runs between the limbs from front to back.”—‘Western Wilds’ by J. H. Beadle, xvi. page 249>

<1885 “The more industrious, intelligent, and independent [Indians] . . . dress partially in civilized clothing and invariably stick to the blanket, leggins, and GEE-STRING.”—‘Rep. Indian Affairs,’ page 179>

<1891 “Some of the boys wore only ‘G-STRINGS’ (as, for some reason, the breech-clout is commonly called on the prairie).”—“Harper’s Magazine,” December, page 36/2>

<1907 “These Yuma Indians . . . were a peaceful, fine-looking lot, without a thing on but a GEE-STRING.”—‘Arizona Nights’ by S. E. White, I. ix. page 163>

<1936 “One of the girls . . . wiggled her GEESTRING at him” – ‘Big Money’ by John Dos Passos, page 488>

<1939 “It had happened, but quite unwillingly . . . at Congo Club with nothing on but a G-STRING and some talcum powder.”—‘After Many a Summer’ by Aldous Huxley, xii. page 168>

<1951 “What I know about politics you could put in a chorus girl's G-STRING and it wouldn't raise a lump.”—‘Troubled Air’ by I. Shaw, xxii. page 377>
(Oxford English Dictionary, 20th Century Words by Ayto, Oxford English Dictionary)
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Ken G – December 21, 2004
Reply from Ken Greenwald (Fort Collins, CO - U.S.A.)
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G-string

Post by Archived Reply » Sat Dec 18, 2004 12:07 pm

Public awareness of the G-string gained popularity in Brazil and then America in the 1970’s, although there are instances before this period. The reference is to a swimsuit or underwear, the back of which is so narrow that it disappears into the cleft of the buttocks (as if you didn’t know that!) and the name comes from the thickest string on a violin…about the same thickness of the back part of a G-string. (Gasp)
However, this concept is not exactly new, many primitive tribes (The Khoisan in Africa, for example) have used this type of undergarment for both men and women for many hundreds of years. The wearing of G-strings in the Western world is exclusively a female device, and also goes back several hundred years, being favoured by exotic and/or erotic dancers.
In the 70’s the use of the word “G-string” fell from favour, and the concept of “thong” was promoted, not only as being a little more comfortable, but as an item of underwear that was fashionably unisex, thus widening its marketing appeal. (Although thongs for men didn’t really catch on for another two decades.)
As you mention, with the fashion of women wearing skin-tight or semi-transparent trousers and skirts, one advantage attributed to the wearing of thong underwear is that no visible panty line can be seen. The main drawback to thong underwear is that the fabric must be pulled directly between one's buttocks, which many people find unattractive and/or uncomfortable, but which others actually enjoy.
So, it only remains for me to wish you Seasonal Greetings, and may the clefts in your life have no strings attached, visible or otherwise. Oh…maybe it would be nicer if I said may the clefts in your life have LOTS of strings attached…(but no stings, of course)
Robmas 22dec04

More info at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G-string

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G-string

Post by Archived Reply » Sat Dec 18, 2004 12:21 pm

Winter draws on.
Reply from Leighton Harris (Cambridge - England)
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G-string

Post by Archived Reply » Sat Dec 18, 2004 12:34 pm

And Xmas thongs are being thung...

Robmas 22dec04
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G-string

Post by Archived Reply » Sat Dec 18, 2004 12:47 pm

ljknlih;ikh;ihpih
Reply from Rob Masters (Thailand - Thailand)
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G-string

Post by Archived Reply » Sat Dec 18, 2004 1:01 pm

Robert .. the change of "g-string" to "thong" draws a great many jokes Downunder as a thong in Aus is a very different piece of apparel .. namely a rubber or leather sandal of simple construction that is held on the foot by passing between the first and second toes .. called a jandal in Kiwi land and often called flip-flops due to the sound they make when one walks in them .. they are a standard footwear and the phrase "in ya t-shirt and thongs" means being in a relaxed mode .. of course one always has his best "dress thongs" for special occasions and this is shown in an old joke about, "How do you tell the bride at a surfie wedding ??" .. "She's the one with the white thongs!!" .. boom boom .. there was a famous pub in Sydney where appreciation of the music was shown by removing your thongs and slapping them together .. this in itslef draws a very wonderful picture if an American was told about the thong slapper pub and how they had to remove their "thongs" and slap them together ..
WoZ of Aus 23/12/04

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Post by Archived Reply » Sat Dec 18, 2004 1:14 pm

Thanks for the wonderful insight into this much admired piece of clothing apparel, but I do recall reading some time ago that it originated from a german word - I could be completely wrong. Also,was the term specifically American Indian & anglicised (anglicized for you yanks)?
Regards,
Brian - Australia
PS Woz, us more youthful whippersnappers in Oz do refer to the 'G' as a 'thong' also. Love your work Robert
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Post by Archived Reply » Sat Dec 18, 2004 1:27 pm

.. yes Brian you "more youthful whippersnappers in Oz" probably do call it a "thong" and unfortunately as in so many things you are also losing your distinctive Aussie identity to become shadowy clones of a culture that is alien .. losing your language to copy a foreign tongue is a sad thing for any culture and it is so apparent in the young of today that they have no instinctive pride in being able to speak Australian English but have become vitims of American linguistic imperialism without even realising it ..
WoZ of Aus 25/12/04
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