inkhorn terms

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inkhorn terms

Post by Archived Topic » Sun Dec 12, 2004 2:07 am

.. in doing my in-depth research for /i/ words, now that _was_ a difficult homework assignment, I came across this little gem and thought how nicely it fitted into previous discussions about the pronunciation of loan words in English >>>

Inkhorn terms: "Pedantic terms and learned borrowings from foreign tongues: Thomas Wilson, in his Arte of Rhetorique (1553), observed that the first lesson to be learned was never to affect "any straunge ynkhorne termes, BUT TO SPEAK AS IS COMMONLY RECEIVED".

.. and so I would take heart from this and pronounce loan words as is commonly understood in my culture rather than attempting to affect "straunge" pronunciations that will be heard as pedantic affectations not understood by my native listeners ..
WoZ of Aus 27/11/04
Submitted by Wizard of Oz (Newcastle - Australia)
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inkhorn terms

Post by Archived Reply » Sun Dec 12, 2004 2:21 am

As far as I can see, Wilson was not enjoining people to pronounce loan words willy-nilly as they saw fit, but to avoid them altogether in their speech.

It also seems strange to me that you should 'take heart' from the pronouncements of someone who has been dead for over four centuries in relation to your own use of English. Surely there are many much more plausible (and recent) arbiters of style and pronunciation that make it quite unnecessary to look back as far as the reign of Mary Tudor?
Reply from Erik Kowal ( - England)
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inkhorn terms

Post by Archived Reply » Sun Dec 12, 2004 2:34 am

Wiz, While we are here I might as well discuss the term’s definitions and origin a bit further.

INKHORN TERM or WORD: 1) a 16th century expression for a pedantic or recherché word, which showed signs of having been labored over; affectedly erudite language 2) a word or expression used only in academic writing; a learned, literary, or bookish term 3) an obscure, pedantic word borrowed from another language and especially a dubious borrowing or hybrid from classical Greek or Latin; an erudite neologism; an AUREATE WORD (a floridly abstruse Latinate word).

The ‘inkhorn’ was the small portable receptacle used to hold writing ink, originally made of horn but later also of wood, or metal, which pedants and pedagogues carried with them. It symbolizes pedantry and affected erudition in this expression as well as in TO SMELL OF THE INKHORN ‘to be pedantic.’ The expression, now archaic’ dates from at least 1543
<1543 “Soche are your YNKEHORNE termes.”—‘ Yet a Course at the Romyshe Foxe’ by BALE, page 59b>

<1583 “Except you would coin such ridiculous INKHORN terms, as you do in the New Testament, ‘azymes,’ ‘prepuce,’ ‘neophyte’ . . ..and such like.”—‘A Defense of the Sincere and True Translations of the Holy Scriptures into the English Tongue’ (1843) by Fluke, iii. page 207>

<1589 “Irrevocable, irradiation, depopulation and such like, . . . which . . . were long time despised for INKEHORNE termes.”—‘The Art of English Poesy (Abridged), II. xii, page 130>

<1589 “Wherefore thoughe he had done it of an INK HORNE desire to be eloquent.”—‘Menaphon’ (Abridged) by Greene, page 51>

<1964 “Despite its well-known flaws—its prejudices . . .; its pedantry . . .; and its inclusion of outlandish INKHORN WORDS . . . the publication of Johnson’s Dictionary [[Dr. Samuel, 1755]] represented a turning point in the history of the English language.”—‘The Treasure of Our Tongue’ by Lincoln Barnett>
(Oxford English Dictionary, Brewer’s and Oxford Dictionaries of Phrase and Fable, Picturesque Expressions by Urdang, Gramb’s Word’s About Words)
_____________________

Ken – November 26, 2004
Reply from Ken Greenwald (Fort Collins, CO - U.S.A.)
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inkhorn terms

Post by Archived Reply » Sun Dec 12, 2004 2:47 am

So "Biro" was never inkhorn, even in the days before the RAF set the ball rolling?
Reply from Edwin Ashworth (Oldham - England)
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Post by Archived Reply » Sun Dec 12, 2004 3:01 am

We need a professional birologist to answer that one.
Reply from Erik Kowal ( - England)
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Post by Archived Reply » Sun Dec 12, 2004 3:14 am

.. Erik I suppose my taking heart from writings of the 1500s is in the same vein that the yanks trot out the fact that many of their appalling spellings of English words in current usage were used by this person or that person, eg Shakespeare, back in the distant past .. it is all academic and makes for wonderful debate .. *grin* ..
WoZ of Aus 29/11/04
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inkhorn

Post by trolley » Wed Mar 26, 2014 4:31 pm

While watching the tv news this morning I heard someone say “supposably” when they obviously meant “supposedly”. This one always gives me a little chuckle, not so much because it’s incorrect but rather that it completely changes their statement. They’re really saying something quite different from what they think they are. I headed off to Google to see how widespread this was (and to make sure that they aren’t, in fact, interchangeable). I was reading some thoughts posted on a discussion of the two words and someone claimed that supposably was an “inkhorn”. A what? I immediately thought of eggcorn (a word that I first heard here) but somehow, it just didn’t fit. As usual, I abandon my original hunt, take a sharp left and start tracking the rare inkhorn. There’s a couple of interesting reads on inkhorn terms here http://www.worldwidewords.org/articles/inkhorn.htm and here https://www.dictionaryproject.org/news/ ... horn-terms. After writing this all out in my hunt and peck typing style, I see that this has already been touched on here but I’m posting it anyway. I’ve only been awake for an hour and already I’ve learnt a few things. Now I can coast for the rest of the day. As an aside, I usually type my posts in Word and it seems that my spell-checker chuckles at “supposably”, too. It seems to be chuckling because it doesn’t think it’s a real word, though. Who’s chuckling now?
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Re: inkhorn

Post by Erik_Kowal » Wed Mar 26, 2014 5:01 pm

I am, because I enjoyed your posting.

It would also amuse me if you could set Word's spell-check function to make a funny sound whenever a misspelling was committed (perhaps a grunt, fart, or cock-a-doodle-doo) instead of merely marking it with a red squiggle. I know some people whose spelling would make their desks go off like a regular farmyard. This would make them an asset to the household, sentimentally calling to mind long-ago bucolic ambles conducted arm-in-arm with one's faithful companion, periodically crossing stinking, turd-infested, piss-puddled, fly-ridden mires on a warm and hazy English summer evening.
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