tear

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tear

Post by Archived Topic » Fri Dec 10, 2004 11:01 pm

How can a word eg. TEAR have 2 different meaning??
Submitted by suneeta K (singapore - Singapore)
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tear

Post by Archived Reply » Fri Dec 10, 2004 11:14 pm

Suneeta, These things happen. Each word developed separately from different ancient roots and following separate paths just happened to end up being spelled the same.

‘Tear,’ rip, comes from Middle English ‘teren’ (before 900), which was ‘teran’ in Old English (about 1000), which was earlier ‘teoran’ (before 850), which was cognate with Old Saxon ‘terian,’ consume, destroy, from Goth ‘distairan,’ to destroy, form Greek ‘dérein,’ to flay

‘Tear,’ a drop of water from the eye, comes from Middle English ‘teer’ (before 900), from Old English ‘tear,’ ‘tehher,’ ‘taeher,’ developed from earlier ‘teahor, tæhher’ (about 725 in Beowulf), cognate with Old Fisian ‘tar,’ tear, . . . The verb ‘tear,’ to shed tears, before 1425 was ‘teren.’ . . .

(Barnhart Concise Dictionary of Etymology, Random House Unabridged Dictionary)
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November 21, 2004
Reply from Ken Greenwald (Fort Collins, CO - U.S.A.)
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tear

Post by Archived Reply » Fri Dec 10, 2004 11:27 pm

The English language is full of words that have several meanings...it is one of the many problems!
Try "Saw". "Right". "Sow". "Fly".

If you are not sure, then ask here. I am sure some one will try to help you.
Robert
Reply from Robert Masters (Asia - Thailand)
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