Kiwi

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Kiwi

Post by Archived Topic » Mon Dec 06, 2004 2:41 am

What is the origin of the nickname kiwi given to new-zealanders?
Submitted by Dark Tundra (Melbourne - Australia)
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Kiwi

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Dec 06, 2004 2:56 am

Dark, The kiwi is the national bird of New Zealand and the following is a short history of how it came to be the national symbol and name for a New Zealander (chemistry.co.nz/kiwibird.htm):

The Kiwi as an emblem first appeared late last century in New Zealand regimental badges. Badges of the South Canterbury Battalion in 1886 and the Hastings Rifle Volunteers in 1887 both featured kiwis. Later, kiwis appeared in a great number of military badges. In 1887 the new Auckland University College (opened 1883) featured on their Coat of Arms three kiwis, symbolising the confinement of the kiwi to the islands of New Zealand. Students of the University in 1905, began publishing a magazine called “The Kiwi” which survived until the mid 1960s.

The Kiwi symbol began to be recognised internationally in 1906 when Kiwi Shoe Polish was launched in Melbourne by a man with a New Zealand born wife. The polish was widely marketed in Britain and the USA during World War I and later. By 1908, kiwis were appearing in numerous sporting, political, and other newspaper cartoons.

During the First World War, New Zealanders carved a giant kiwi on the chalk hill above Sling Camp in England. In Flanders during the war, the name “Kiwi” for New Zealand soldiers came into general use. By the Second World War, the Kiwi was synonymous with New Zealand Servicemen overseas. During the war, the Kiwi Concert Party toured many battle areas. The Kiwi (New Zealand Army) Football Team which toured the British Isles, France and Germany in 1945-46 also enchanced the emblem’s popularity.

Today, New Zealanders overseas (and at home) are still invariably called “Kiwis”. The Kiwi is still closely associated with the Armed Forces. The New Zealand dollar is often referred to as the “The Kiwi” and the kiwi fruit is known as a “Kiwi” in some countries. Kiwis feature in the coat of arms, crests and badges of many New Zealand cities, clubs and organisations.
_______________________

Ken G – November 20, 2004
Reply from Ken Greenwald (Fort Collins, CO - U.S.A.)
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Kiwi

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Dec 06, 2004 3:10 am

To which I can only add that the indigenous population in general regard "New Zealander" as a term which should mean only Maori. The rest are English migrants, even if they arrived six generations or so ago, plus a mixture of many other races. 'Kiwi' too is not a term usually used by Maori. We are at most regarded as New Zealanders of the pakeha iwi or tribe. Maori being an official language, and 'Aotearoa' a correct postal name for the country.
Reply from John Barton (New Plymouth - New Zealand)
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Kiwi

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Dec 06, 2004 3:25 am

p.s. which may sound rather petty, but whilst living in my home-country, England, close to Clacton and inheriting a Roman nose, it used to annoy me to be described as 'English'. Since the English came out on a later boat, 5 or 6 centuries ago, from Schlesvig-Holstein. And my family, descended from Clactonian Man, walked across the ice from Europe half a million years ago, to become the British, before ships were invented. Not that anyone could call me a snob...
Reply from John Barton (New Plymouth - New Zealand)
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Post by Archived Reply » Mon Dec 06, 2004 3:39 am

John
I take mild offence as to your discription of ones nationality, my mother was born in Scotland, my great grandfather was born in England, I was born in Canada.
I moved to Australia in 1972 and became a citizen in 74. Australians treat me as an Australian. I work, pay tax, vote,and I love Australia. I have a father and sister living in Australia, another sister in Canada, another sister living in the USA, a brother living in Thailand. So when someone arrives in a country, is really not that important.5 years a million years. I am an Australian!!!
Reply from Gary Wallington (Akolele - Australia)
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Kiwi

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Dec 06, 2004 3:53 am

H'mm! Gary - no offence meant, but that makes it difficult for me- with 19 years in Britain, 48 in Aotearoa,2 in Libya, 1 in Egypt,a sister born in Khartoum, and a stay of from hours to weeks in some 17 other countries. I note that census and other official forms are increasingly adjusting the "What race are you?" question to "What ethnic group do you most identify with?". Implying that people can be minds as well as bodies. Too many people were entering "human".
Incidentally, a N.Z. census question "State length of your residence in N.Z." elicited the response "46 and a half feet, not counting the verandah". Another, conducted in the off-shore islands "How many children do you have, by sex?" was answered in most cases by "All of them".
Reply from John Barton (New Plymouth - New Zealand)
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Post by Archived Reply » Mon Dec 06, 2004 4:08 am

I love those answers. Can you quote any more?
Reply from Erik Kowal ( - England)
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Post by Archived Reply » Mon Dec 06, 2004 4:22 am

Can't think of any, Erik, except I recall an article in the 50's in which minority religions declared in the census were discussed, many unique. A single "diabolical necromancer" was reported in good faith without hint of being facetious. Also a lady who, failing to find a book in our local library, asked in desperation: "Could someone please tell me where I can find Thomas Gray?". The librarian, with a look of great concentration, replied "I think he's buried in a churchyard somewhere". I love 'my' country too!
Reply from John Barton (New Plymouth - New Zealand)
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Post by Archived Reply » Mon Dec 06, 2004 4:37 am

John, Those were really good. This has nothing to with anything except humor, but I was looking at this little book called ‘Canadian Saying’ by Cassleman, on Amazon this morning and almost feel off my chair when I looked at a blow-up of the cover which was covered with sayings and I just could make out this one: “She’s been married so many times, she has veil rash.” I love it!

Ken – November 21, 2004
Reply from Ken Greenwald (Fort Collins, CO - U.S.A.)
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Post by Archived Reply » Mon Dec 06, 2004 4:51 am

John, I see that you had lived in Libya for a couple of years,where in Libya? I am originally from Benghazi.
Ahmed
22nd of November,2004
Reply from Ahmed ELNamer (Dawson Creek - Canada)
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Post by Archived Reply » Mon Dec 06, 2004 5:05 am

A census taker is aa man who goes from house to house, increasing the population.
Reply from Gary Wallington (Akolele - Australia)
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