nadryv / nadrif / nadriff

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nadryv / nadrif / nadriff

Post by Archived Topic » Sun Dec 05, 2004 3:39 pm

I am trying to recall a word similar to NADRIF or NADRIFF used by Fyodor Dostoevsky in one of his works; I believe it was "Crime and Punishment". It expressed consternation I believe. It was similar to Nadrif or Nadraf? It has been driving me nuts and I cannot find any reference to it anywhere. Of course I do not remember how to spell but once I found reference to it on the web but I’ve forgotten where or how I located it. Anyone? Nadrif!
Submitted by chuck Nowotny (Huntington Beach - U.S.A.)
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nadryv / nadrif / nadriff

Post by Archived Reply » Sun Dec 05, 2004 3:53 pm

At http://www.online-literature.com/authorsearch.php, you can do a text search across several of his works including C&P, The Brothers Karamazov, etc. I found no unfamiliar words containing nad, nav, naf, dri, dra, rif, or raf but you can keep trying.
Reply from Russ Cable (Dallas, TX - U.S.A.)
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nadryv / nadrif / nadriff

Post by Archived Reply » Sun Dec 05, 2004 4:08 pm

Chuck, I think what you are after is the Russian word which can be transliterated from the Cyrillic script as 'nadryv'. It should be noted that there are several parallel sets of conventions for the transliteration of Cyrillic characters into Roman ones, so 'nadrif' or 'nadriff' are also quite possible. Because the latter two are rather old-fashioned, I suspect you found the word in an older translation of C & P (Constance Garnett's, perhaps?).

Anyhow, my Oxford Russian-English dictionary gives four related definitions of 'nadryv':

1. Slight tear, rent; 2. Strain; 3. (fig.) Sharp deterioration of psychological state; crack-up; 4. Violent expression of emotion.
Reply from Erik Kowal ( - England)
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