fuzzy end of the lollipop

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fuzzy end of the lollipop

Post by Archived Topic » Sat Nov 20, 2004 1:01 pm

The referenced phrase is used many times in "Some Like it Hot". My friends and I have argued about the origin of this phrase; does it refer to 1) the end of the stick without candy 2) the end of the stick when the candy has gone 3) a generally dirty lollipop? Was the phrase concocted for the movie or was it in general use? If so, when.

Thank you in advance.
Submitted by David Pruitt (Shelbyville - U.S.A.)
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fuzzy end of the lollipop

Post by Archived Reply » Sat Nov 20, 2004 1:15 pm

In the screwball movie, Monroe who dreams of marrying a millionaire, despairs, "I always get the fuzzy end of the lollipop." I have never heard it in any previous context, so I think that we can assume that it was a Curtis/Lemmonism.

16.08.04
Reply from Graham Godwin (Bath - England)
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fuzzy end of the lollipop

Post by Archived Reply » Sat Nov 20, 2004 1:29 pm

Dave and Graham, I couldn’t find the derivation of this expression, but logic would seem to say that the implication in this and similar expressions (‘the shitty end of the stick,’ ‘short end of the stick, ‘the rough end of the pineapple’), is that there is a clear choice of which is better between the two ends. And it seems like the only really clear choice between good and bad is between the end of the stick with candy and the ‘fuzzy’ end (the ‘fuzzy’ cardboard end as opposed to the ‘smooth’ candy end). If the candy was gone that end admittedly would tend to be fuzzier than the other end (as all of us who have sucked on those things know). But would getting the fuzzy end be a hell of a lot better than getting the other end if there is nothing on it (well, perhaps the used candy end is a bit less appealing). And again with the dirty lollipop theory it is a choice between bad and worse.

I tend to think that the expression preceded the movie because the movie, as I recall, seemed to go through great pains to reproduce historical authenticity (filmed in the historic Coronado Hotel rather than on a movie set, etc.) and it might have been a bit out of character for them to have created a phony expression rather than using a real one – the phrase has the sound of something that may have had some temporary exposure in the early talk shows of the 1950s (e.g. Steve Allen, Jack Paar).

Cassell’s Dictionary of Slang did list the expression, but only provided the date 1950s with no derivation and the definition “Hostile or unfair treatment.”
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Ken G – August 17, 2004
Reply from Ken Greenwald (Fort Collins, CO - U.S.A.)
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Re: fuzzy end of the lollipop

Post by zoe » Thu Apr 04, 2013 11:53 pm

This is a long time after the question was asked, but I thought I'd contribute anyway - and say hello.

There is an expression, "Hairy lollipop", which is a common synonym for fallatio for what I hope obvious reasons. The subtext is that Sugar (Marilyn Monroe's character) is tired of giving blowjobs rather than having straight sex within marriage. In another line she expresses her concern that she has hit 25 and is still unmarried, "That's a quarter of a century; makes a girl think!" Clarinets, saxophones, oboes are also euphemisms for penises. "Player of the pink oboe" is fairly obvious. Also, the replaceable reeds in these instruments are sometimes called, "lollipop sticks' because they resemble the wooden sticks in ice lollipops. When the reeds have become unusable, they are, in effect 'fuzzy' after being in the player's mouth for so long as to distort them and they have to be discarded and replace. Put all this together, and the phrase, "I'm tired of getting the fuzzy end of the lollipop" is rich in meaning. She's tired of being discarded and replaced. It's a multi-leveled metaphor, Maybe all of these meanings were going through Sugar's head when she came out with it. She didn't have to go into all the sordid details because she was talking girl to girl (or so she thought!) and Josephine would get it. That was a nice piece of irony. Joe is clearly confused by the encounter and is on the verge of telling Sugar that he is a male and is attracted to her; he even blurts out, "I play tenor saxophone' but she says, "But you're not a man, thank goodness".

I hope this helps someone - even if the original poster has moved on. :)

Zoe
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Re: fuzzy end of the lollipop

Post by Wizard of Oz » Fri Apr 05, 2013 6:53 am

.. thanks Zoe .. makes sense .. my 9 yo granddaughter came home and told her parents that she had passed the blow test at school .. in fact she did so well in her blow test that she now plays the oboe in the school band .. just what every father wants to hear !! ..

WoZ on tin whistle
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Signature: "The question is," said Alice, "whether you can make words mean so many different things."

Re: fuzzy end of the lollipop

Post by Erik_Kowal » Fri Apr 05, 2013 7:15 am

Did you ask her what colour it is?
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