Is "Kemet" the source of "chemical", "alchemy", and "hermeti

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Is "Kemet" the source of "chemical", "alchemy", and "hermeti

Post by Archived Topic » Fri Oct 29, 2004 8:53 pm

"Kemet" (Mdu N'tr) is thought to be the original name of Egypt (Greek).

Do the words "chemical", "alchemy", and "hermetical" derive their source from the word "kemet"?
Submitted by Che Baraka (NYC - U.S.A.)
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Is "Kemet" the source of "chemical", "alchemy", and "hermeti

Post by Archived Reply » Fri Oct 29, 2004 9:08 pm

Che, As far as I could determine the Romans called Egypt ‘Aegyptus’ and the Greek name for Egypt was ‘Aiguptos.’ Both of these were adaptations of the Egyptian word ‘hutkaptah,’ temple of the soul of the deity Ptah. The Egyptian name for Egypt, however, was ‘Kemet.’

It appears to me that KEMET has nothing to do with any of these three words although ‘chemical’ and ‘hermetic’ are linked to ‘alchemy.’ The word ALCHEMY comes via Old French and medieval Latin from Arabic ‘alkimiya,’ ‘al,’ the +‘kimiya,’ which comes from the Greek ‘khemia’ or ‘khemeia’ meaning ‘the art of transmuting metals.’ In early use ‘alchemy’ referred to the chemistry of the Middle ages and 16th century. The main practical aims of this early chemistry were the search for 1) a way of transmuting baser metals into gold, and 2) the ‘alkahest’ or universal solvent, capable of dissolving any material 3) the panacea, the all-healing universal remedy.

CHEMICAL was formed in English probably from the New Latin ‘chimicus’ (+ ‘al,’ of or related to) which was short for the Medieval Latin ‘alchimicus’ meaning of alchemy, which derives from ‘alchimia,’ alchemy.

HERMETIC commonly refers to a seal which is complete and airtight. It originally referred to an ancient occult tradition encompassing alchemy, astrology, and theosophy (philosophical or religious thought based on a mystical insight into the divine nature). ‘Hermetic’ derives from Latin ‘hermeticus.’ However, two reliable sources give two slightly different explanations of how the ‘Hermes’ got into ‘hermeticus’: 1) ‘hermeticus,’ is a Latin irregular formation from ‘Hermes Trismegistus,’ a legendary figure regarded by Neoplatonists and others as the author of certain works on astrology, magic, an alchemy. 2) ‘hermeticus’ is an adjective adapted from Greek ‘Hermes,’ god of science and arts, who was identified by the Neoplatonists, mystics, and alchemists with the Egyptian god Thoth, who supposedly invented the process of making a glass tube airtight by using a secret seal.

(Barnhart Concise Dictionary of Etymology, Brewer’s Names, Oxford Dictionary of Word Histories)
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Ken G – March 9, 2004
Reply from Ken Greenwald (Fort Collins, CO - U.S.A.)
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Is "Kemet" the source of "chemical", "alchemy", and "hermeti

Post by Archived Reply » Fri Oct 29, 2004 9:22 pm

The word Alkimiya or Kimiya is still used to describe the subject of Chemistry. Also, when we say Egyptian are we talking about the language Arabic or just the word Egyptians? Egyptians refer to them selves as Masri and the country in Arabic is not Egypt but Masur.
Ahmed 9th of March,2004
Reply from Ahmed ELNamer (Dawson Creek - Canada)
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Re: Is

Post by aufumy » Sun Aug 07, 2016 2:11 am

Yes Che, from the UK Royal Society of Chemistry:
The Arabic root "kimia" comes from the Coptic "khem" that alluded to the fertile black soil of the Nile delta. Esoterically and hieroglyphically, the word refers to the dark mystery of the primordial or First Matter (the Khem).
Both Kemet and Khem allude to the black soil of the Nile river.

Ahmed ELNamer, Che is referring to the ancient Egyptians not the current Arabic Egyptians.
https://www.audreyfoo.com/2016/08/06/an ... ere-black/
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