word that has changed its meaning in the last ten years.

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word that has changed its meaning in the last ten years.

Post by Archived Topic » Mon May 31, 2004 11:03 pm

I have to find an english word that has changed its meaning in the last ten years. The word "gay" is an example of such a change, but the change occoured over 30 years ago. Slang words are considered part of the accepted english vocabulary.
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word that has changed its meaning in the last ten years.

Post by Archived Reply » Mon May 31, 2004 11:17 pm

This wouldn’t help much with any homework problem that anyone might happen to have, which might happened to be related to this question, but here’s a phrase that has changed its meaning over the last ten years: “the last ten years”
Reply from Ken Greenwald (Fort Collins, CO - U.S.A.)
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word that has changed its meaning in the last ten years.

Post by Archived Reply » Mon May 31, 2004 11:32 pm

Speaking of which, I have recently noticed how Americans almost always refer to "the last several (years, days, months)" in situations when Britons will be much more likely to speak of "the past few ...".

I wonder how or when this difference in usage arose.
Reply from Erik Kowal ( - England)
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word that has changed its meaning in the last ten years.

Post by Archived Reply » Mon May 31, 2004 11:46 pm

Oh, the English are always bragging about their past and can't resist the opportunity to drop a reference to it in a sentence. They might well be referring to a time in the 1400's when they say "in the past few years." We 'Merikins try to stay in the recent past; the last 24 hours, for example, as our heads hurt trying to remember anything that happened to those dead, white, Euro-laden, people! *G*

Leif of Eatonville, WA
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word that has changed its meaning in the last ten years.

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Jun 01, 2004 12:01 am

Yes, attention spans continue to decrease down your way, Leif!
Reply from Erik Kowal ( - England)
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word that has changed its meaning in the last ten years.

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Jun 01, 2004 12:15 am

Right on! History. What’s history? There’s only current events over here, and current events doesn’t mean yesterday – it means now. And now means right now. We’re talkin’ “real-time” baby.
Reply from Ken Greenwald (Fort Collins, CO - U.S.A.)
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word that has changed its meaning in the last ten years.

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Jun 01, 2004 12:29 am

Shame on you all! We haven't yet even ATTEMPTED to help poor, anonymous (-) with his/her homework. And EVERYONE knows that is our primary function (maybe even our "Prime Directive") here in WooWooLand. Therefore, Ken, Erik, and Leif, I expect you all to hop to it and complete this homework assignment before (-) has to resort to doing his/her own research! So, each of you, think hard about a word that fits the criteria . . . concentrate . . . don't write it down or post it . . . just send "vibes" to (-), and I'm sure he/she will be able to complete the assignment in no time!

Now, for all you monkeys out there, the above is NOT to be taken literally--I am speaking entirely tongue-in-cheek! (What a sad state we have sunk into when we have to ANNOUNCE that we're trying to be humorous. Oh, for the good old days when everyone KNEW when someone was joking!)
Reply from K Allen Griffy (Springfield, IL - U.S.A.)
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word that has changed its meaning in the last ten years.

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Jun 01, 2004 12:44 am

Dear Anonymous. I'm thinking of a two word phrase. It is in the dictionary and it would satisfy your requirements in that it has added a new meaning (although the old one is still in tact)- and so "its meaning has changed." The hint is that it changed as a result of the 9/11 attack on the World Trade Center.
Reply from Ken Greenwald (Fort Collins, CO - U.S.A.)
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word that has changed its meaning in the last ten years.

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Jun 01, 2004 12:58 am

Dear Anonymous. I am thinking of three words that have taken on new meaning in our everyday conversation (although the dictionary wont change any definitions) intimately related to the first response given to your question (think zeros). These words are usually preceded by an article (the part of speech).
Reply from Ken Greenwald (Fort Collins, CO - U.S.A.)
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word that has changed its meaning in the last ten years.

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Jun 01, 2004 1:13 am

Allen (or anyone else), not to get distracted once more, but when you said “be able to complete the assignment in no time,” it brought to mind a question that has bothered me (but not really that much). If you had left out the “no” in that sentence, which would be proper to say (or maybe it doesn’t make any difference), “in time” or “on time”? Is this another NYC (“déjà vu all over again”) issue or is it something else? I would tend to say “I wanted to finish the assignment “on time” not “in time,” when making a stand-alone statement like this one. However, I would tend, in general, to use “in time” when there is something else to be done next: “finish the assignment in time to go to bed early” or when there is an implied “next” in a conversation – “Oh yeah, Dave, I’ll finish in time.” Any thoughts?

Also, the previous paragraph was a minefield (for me) of punctuation (periods, commas, quotation marks, guest ion marks, inside or outside the quotes, …), and I’m going more on “feel” or rules that I once learned but have long forgotten, than on specifically knowing what the actual rules are. See any punctuation that you would change?

Reply from Ken Greenwald (Fort Collins, CO - U.S.A.)
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word that has changed its meaning in the last ten years.

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Jun 01, 2004 1:27 am

Amendment to my second "Dear Anonymous" question above. Could have said "preceded by an adjective or an article." This in itself is another hint.
Reply from Ken Greenwald (Fort Collins, CO - U.S.A.)
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word that has changed its meaning in the last ten years.

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Jun 01, 2004 1:41 am

Although it might not appear in a dictionary, I think the word "is" certainly got a different meaning attached to it.

Leif
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word that has changed its meaning in the last ten years.

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Jun 01, 2004 2:10 am

“Is” can apply to the infinitesimal as well as the very large, so I think its meaning wasn’t altered, but in retrospect, I think the hint and, in fact, the whole question (8th from the top – “three words, think zeros”) stinks and is respectfully withdrawn. The 9/11 one is still OK (depending on what your definition of OK is).
Reply from Ken Greenwald (Fort Collins, CO - U.S.A.)
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word that has changed its meaning in the last ten years.

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Jun 01, 2004 2:25 am

I find that many Americans tend to use a number of words where we British find that one word is sufficient. For example "At this moment in time" for "now" The result is much crisper language.

In answer to the original question may I suggest virus, aids, organic, cellular, transplant, and partner.
Reply from Melvyn Goodman (London - England)
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word that has changed its meaning in the last ten years.

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Jun 01, 2004 2:39 am

Actually, Ken, you did quite well with your convoluted paragraph. (And I thought I was the only one who could use that many quotation marks, parentheses, etc. in one sentence! *G*) Periods and commas ALWAYS go inside quotes; question marks & exclamation marks go either inside or outside, depending on the context (you used them correctly). The only thing I would have changed is the quote within the quote: it should have single quotes ('). It does get a bit much, though, when you have to have single quotes and then double quotes together ("blah, blah, 'blah.'")--it looks awkward, and it's sometimes hard to read (depending on the type font). Overall, I think you did very well--I'd give you an A- (and I'm a VERY tough grader)! *G*
Reply from K Allen Griffy (Springfield, IL - U.S.A.)
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