aptronym / aptonym / euonym / charactonym / label name

Discuss word origins and meanings.

Re: aptronym / aptonym / euonym / charactonym / label name

Post by Wizard of Oz » Sun Jul 10, 2011 5:05 am

.. Ken I don't agree totally with the following definition ..
In Play: Caconyms are first and foremost bad names: "No wonder he goes by the nickname 'Bud'; his parents cursed him with the caconym, Percival Aloysius."
.. the example is a value judgement as there would be many men who would be proud to be a Percival, I have an uncle Percy, and of course we have a Saint Aloysius .. the caconym arises when ordinary names, or unusual names, are joined .. for example Teresa is a nice name but if your surname is Green then you have a possible caconym .. and of course anyone in the Hunt family who names their baby son Michael is cursing him for life .. a word in itself is not a caconym .. caconyms are situational and are created by how a word is ascribed to a person or product ..

WoZ who married a Hall and could've been a Hall-Porter
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Signature: "The question is," said Alice, "whether you can make words mean so many different things."

Re: aptronym / aptonym / euonym / charactonym / label name

Post by Ken Greenwald » Mon Jul 11, 2011 7:39 am

I think that what is and isn’t a CACONYM may very well be, in many cases, a value judgment. If you grew up where I grew up in Brooklyn and your name was Percival Aloysius, you would have a serious problem. I see nothing wrong with the name, but there are those who would laugh their heads off and tease the kid to death (value judgment – caconym).

So what is one man’s caconym may not be another’s . . . For example, I have no idea who Teresa Green or Michael Hunt are. So if you think they might be caconyms, I have no idea why (value judgment – caconym).

And I’m not sure where you got your definition of caconym, but I think if someone’s name was Shithead, most English-speaking folks would consider that “undesirable” and if they read the above definitions they might conclude that it is a caconym.

Ken – July 10, 2010 [who, in days of very yore (pre-high school) had the caconym ‘Greenballs’ – Why did I give that away?] (>:)
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Re: aptronym / aptonym / euonym / charactonym / label name

Post by Erik_Kowal » Mon Jul 11, 2011 8:17 am

Teresa Green --> 'Trees are green'
Michael Hunt --> Mike Hunt ('My cunt').

In my opinion, to qualify as a caconym a name needs to be either patently offensive or to expose its bearer to malicious ridicule.

Using this rather subjective criterion, I think the first of these examples scarcely qualifies (it seems to me to be merely mildly humorous), and the second is offensive only when Michael gets shortened to Mike in the context of the first name plus surname. I therefore rate it as an 'it depends'.
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Re: aptronym / aptonym / euonym / charactonym / label name

Post by Edwin F Ashworth » Mon Jul 11, 2011 10:30 pm

Wiz writes: .. the caconym arises when ordinary names, or unusual names, are joined ..

There was a teacher at a school the wife of a friend of mine used to attend called Attrick and dubbed Gerald. According to the lady (who was a lot younger then). However, mononomials can also cause problems - the French had a debate over whether the name translating as cabbage stump - I forget it now; it may be Tronceau - should be replaced.
Last edited by Edwin F Ashworth on Tue Jul 12, 2011 8:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: aptronym / aptonym / euonym / charactonym / label name

Post by Shelley » Tue Jul 12, 2011 6:53 pm

Ken Greenwald wrote:. . . adjective: euonymous: Suitably named. ( Merriam-Webster’s Unabridged Dictionary. . .
Euonymus, you gotta mouse -- that's what I always say!
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Re: aptronym / aptonym / euonym / charactonym / label name

Post by Ken Greenwald » Wed Jul 13, 2011 6:40 am

Shelley, I thought with our current political climate, you had decided to defect (but where?). I'm glad you didn't.

MERRIAM-WEBSTER'S UNABRIDGED DICTIONARY provides two separate headwords with no preference given.

The OED lists EUONYMUS as the headword and says “also EUONYMOUS.”

So I'd say that my MOUS is OK. (<:)
_________________

Ken – July 12, 2011
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Re: aptronym / aptonym / euonym / charactonym / label name

Post by Wizard of Oz » Sun Jul 17, 2011 3:02 am

.. so it seems that caconym is one of those rather useless terms as it has no meaningful definition and purely depends upon the value judgement of the speaker .. what today is a caconym is tomorrow simply a name .. if I use the word to describe something to you, you have no meaningful frame of reference .. as a scientist Ken you can see the problems that this presents .. imagine if all definitions had a value judgement clause ..

.. take the surname Fuchs .. any student of German would recognise it as being fox .. not a problem .. but the endless teasing that a child endures due to the visual similarity to THAT naughty word is merciless .. is it a caconym ?? .. depends .. take the brand name FCUK .. is it a caconym ?? .. or just clever marketing .. if I told you that some schools here abouts have banned people, staff and students, from wearing clothes from that company within school grounds would you agree ?? .. value judgement ..

WoZ who can't afford that brand
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Re: aptronym / aptonym / euonym / charactonym / label name

Post by Bobinwales » Sun Jul 17, 2011 1:08 pm

WoZ, I don’t have a lot of time for that particular company myself, and if I could afford to wear it I wouldn’t. However, I will say that if it is not a marketing ploy I don’t really know what French Connection United Kingdom has with Australia.
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Signature: All those years gone to waist!
Bob in Wales

Re: aptronym / aptonym / euonym / charactonym / label name

Post by Edwin F Ashworth » Sun Jul 17, 2011 8:48 pm

Former Colony (Underside) (Kiwiless)
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Re: aptronym / aptonym / euonym / charactonym / label name

Post by Wizard of Oz » Tue Jul 19, 2011 7:23 am

.. Edwin .. very clever, I like it .. *sound of two half hands clapping* ..

.. and Bob we are obviously two, poor, well-bred Gentlemen .. personally I prefer cheaper clothes and more pints .. after a few pints who cares what you are wearing ?? ..

WoZ wearing hand-me-downs
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Signature: "The question is," said Alice, "whether you can make words mean so many different things."

Re: aptronym / aptonym / euonym / charactonym / label name

Post by Ken Greenwald » Wed Jul 20, 2011 6:08 am

I was reading our local newspaper today, The Coloradan, which I don’t normally read because it is so bad that I canceled my subscription many years ago. But I was forced to touch it today because it was delivered to the front door of a friend whose cat I’m taking care of while she’s away. So, I sat down and thumbed through it to see if had improved over the years – it hadn’t.

On the front page was a picture of man standing in front of what looked like water flowing over a river dam. The caption read (and the caption was it – no accompanying story):
<2011 “Aaron Million of Fort Collins stands by the Poudre River at Legacy park in 2008. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said its environmental review of Million’s 550-mile water pipeline project has been terminated after Million re-purposed the project. How much of the $3 million has been wasted is unknown.”—The Coloradoan, July 19, page 1>
So, let's see. They give a guy by the name of Million, three million dollars for a pipeline project (possibly a design, possibly a review of a design, possibly to begin construction, but who knows the difference – certainly not the Coloradoan). However, he decides to do something else with the money altogether (he re-purposes it – would have been nice to mention what for). Then, when the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers goes to do an environmental review of his project, they find there is nothing to review because Million decided to do something else with the millions. So, after reviewing his non-review, they made the tough decision to pull the plug on Million’s project. And who knows how many millions Million has wasted. Well, at least one Million got wasted – he was so drunk after hearing the bad news that they had to carry him out of the bar.

I know this was tough reading just to provide yet another example of an aptonym. So for your indulgence, thanks a million.
_________________

Ken – July 19, 2011
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Re: aptronym / aptonym / euonym / charactonym / label name

Post by Erik_Kowal » Wed Jul 20, 2011 7:47 am

I read it somewhat differently, Ken. The quote says "The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said its environmental review of Million’s 550-mile water pipeline project has been terminated after Million re-purposed the project". In other words, it was not the money that was repurposed, but the pipeline project.

Being curious as to what exactly the project was supposed to encompass, I Googled "Aaron Million" pipeline and lighted on quite a few relevant hits. Among them is this
2010-04-06 op ed, from which it emerges that the pipeline project involves piping water from the Flaming Gorge Reservoir on the Utah-Wyoming border in order to irrigate the Front Range, part of the Southern Rockies located in north central Colorado and southeastern Wyoming.

The planned repurposing of the project is described in this 2011-05-23 article in -- yes, the Coloradoan -- as centring on the use of the water for hydropower as well as Colorado agriculture and municipal needs.

According to this article, "If built, the $3 billion pipeline would pump 250,000 acre feet of water annually from Flaming Gorge on the Green River along a path roughly following Interstate 80 through southern Wyoming before dropping south near Fort Collins and eventually to its end near Pueblo [an industrial city in northwest central Colorado - EK]. A variety of Larimer County and other Front Range irrigators and water districts have expressed interest in the project, which Million said could generate more than 1,000 megawatts of hydropower as the pipeline drops from Laramie, Wyo., to Fort Collins.

'The Army Corps’ environmental review of the project was expected to continue through 2018, but Million said Thursday the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, which permits hydropower projects, may be the appropriate agency to conduct the environmental review of the project because of its new focus on hydropower."
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Re: aptronym / aptonym / euonym / charactonym / label name

Post by Ken Greenwald » Thu Jul 21, 2011 5:14 am

Eirk, You’re right. He's not as big a thief as I had thought.

Million decided he wanted to re-purpose the project to include hydroelectric. He may have wasted a million or two of the three million of the Army Corp of Engineers money (but never mind) when he told them of his revised plan, but he didn’t actually spend any of the money on the new idea.

An interesting point is that one of the probable purposes of Millions re-purposing was that he would get less static from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), which can oversee both the hydroelectric and the pipeline. The Corp of Engineers can only oversee the pipeline. Oh, and I’m sure that the fact that the Army Corp would finish their review in 2018 whereas the FERC said they could fast-track the review in 2 ½ years, might have had something to do with the purpose of Million’s re-purposing.
_________________

Ken – July 20, 2022 (Did you hear about Joe Repurpose who re-purposed his plans for a bridge to build a tunnel?)
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Re: aptronym / aptonym / euonym / charactonym / label name

Post by Edwin F Ashworth » Thu Jul 21, 2011 9:16 am

Allegedly Steve Heighway never capitalised on his Economics degree, choosing a different path.
Neither was Robbie Fowler aptly named.

J Cheever Loophole, purely by chance, entered an apt profession.
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Re: aptronym / aptonym / euonym / charactonym / label name

Post by Ken Greenwald » Fri Oct 21, 2011 4:58 am

I read the following in the obituary column:
<2011 “The ‘tinkerer’ who invented the pacemaker: Wilson Greatbatch's most famous invention came about entirely by accident.”—The Week, 14 October, page 47>
_____________________

Ken – October 20, 2011
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