"a lay down case"

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"a lay down case"

Post by Laurent2022 » Thu Oct 28, 2021 3:34 pm

Hello to all of you, present or not.

My name is Laurent and I live in Belgium; my native language is French.
I love english language but it's obviously an unrequited love, knowing how much it sometimes makes me sweat.
It would be great if you corrected my most awful mistakes: you can be violent, but not too much.

Subject
Without more precise context (it's just about a trial that might take place...or not), which meanings for the above expression could you think of ?
In a slang dictionary, I've seen that "lay down sb" could mean "send in custody", but here, it qualifies a judicial case, so ?

Thanks for your ideas.
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Re: "a lay down case"

Post by trolley » Thu Oct 28, 2021 11:16 pm

Welcome, Laurent. I've never heard of a "lay down case" and, after a quick look on Google, I'm still not sure what it means. One meaning of "lay down/lie down" is to give up or not put up a defence. Maybe a lay down case is one in which the Defence doesn't or can't really dispute the allegations and throws themselves on the mercy of the court?
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Re: "a lay down case"

Post by Laurent2022 » Fri Oct 29, 2021 12:10 am

Thank you John: it makes sense...seemingly a slam dunk for the prosecution...
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Re: "a lay down case"

Post by trolley » Fri Oct 29, 2021 4:22 am

The proverbial open and shut case. It seems to fit but I'm just speculating.
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Re: "a lay down case"

Post by tony h » Sat Oct 30, 2021 12:13 pm

Laurent2022 wrote: Thu Oct 28, 2021 3:34 pm
In a slang dictionary, I've seen that "lay down sb" could mean "send in custody", but here, it qualifies a judicial case, so ?
I do not have any direct experience of the usage. However I note the it is "lay down sb" and it is in relation to a "case". I presume the "sb" is "somebody". So the whole phrase seems to suggest that the case requires "a sacrifice", "somebody to lie down and take the rap". Mind you, I could also construe it to mean the sort of case where all the detail needs to be laid down in the preparatory paperwork eg not much will happen in the theatre of the court.

The only reference I could find is in Leo. Is it a translation back from German?

https://dict.leo.org/forum/viewUnsolved ... en&lp=ende
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Signature: tony

I'm puzzled therefore I think.

Re: "a lay down case"

Post by Laurent2022 » Sun Oct 31, 2021 2:34 am

No, it's the discussion here:

https://forum.wordreference.com/threads ... e.2501839/

The meaning seems to equate to John's one.
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Re: "a lay down case"

Post by Erik_Kowal » Sun Oct 31, 2021 5:22 am

It's not a term I had encountered till your drew my attention to it, Laurent, but on reading the full context of the expression plus comments at the URL you pointed to, it's quite clear that (as Trolley surmised) "a lay-down case" is equivalent to "an open-and-shut case" — in other words, it's a legal case where there can be no doubt regarding the guilt or innocence of the accused because the evidence (or insufficiency thereof) is unequivocal.

I suspect it is used more often where the evidence indicates the guilt of the accused rather than their innocence.
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Re: "a lay down case"

Post by Laurent2022 » Sun Oct 31, 2021 6:25 pm

Yes, and on the contrary, "it wouldn't be a lay down case" shows that justice is sometimes hesitating.
In short: will Trump be prosecuted (if only for the example) or not: let's brace ourselves awaiting a (possible) planetary surprise.
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Re: "a lay down case"

Post by Wizard of Oz » Thu Jan 20, 2022 7:24 am

The Aussie take on this is our expression,
He was so fat that is was a lay down misère that he wouldn't finish the race.
An open or lay down misère, or misère ouvert is a 500 bid where the player is so sure of losing every trick that they undertake to do so with their cards placed face-up on the table. Consequently, 'lay down misère' is Australian gambling slang for a predicted easy victory.
This expression can be used in isolation to carry a whole raft of unneeded explanation.

S1> "What did you think of Australia playing Tibet in Rugby Union ?"
S2> "Mate it was a lay down misère!"
S1> "Yeah that's what I reckoned."

S2 does not have to go into detail about the game as S1 can fill in the blanks as they are of a mind. It is pertinent to note that gambling doesn't have to be involved and the expression has moved beyond its origins. It is an acceptable term and can be used in all company.
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Signature: "The question is," said Alice, "whether you can make words mean so many different things."

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