glug

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glug

Post by Ken Greenwald » Tue Nov 06, 2018 6:47 pm

<2018 “Start with roasted carrots: a classic, holiday-worthy side dish. Add Simply Organic’s dried rosemary and a few glugs of maple syrup and it’s a seconds-worthy side dish.”—wholefoodsmarket.com, 5 November>

Imagine going through life having eluded crossing paths with the unit the glug. However, it must not be too obscure if Whole Foods used it in an ad for a holiday recipe sent out in millions of emails.

In trying to think of a synonym for ‘glug’ using its context, I had trouble coming up with one. ‘Drops’ seems too small. ‘Spoonfulls’ (teaspoon or tablespoon, is a possibility, but which is it?). ‘Thimbleful’ is also a possibility. But enough of guessing, here is the real deal.

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glug

noun (informal):

1) An amount of liquid poured from a bottle. <A couple of good glugs of gin.> <I poured in a large glug of sherry and cooked further until the alcohol had evaporated. [[evidently, glugs come in different sizes]]

2) The hollow gurgling sound or sounds as of liquid being poured from a bottle with intermittent partial air blockage. Often reduplicated (glub, glub or glub-glub);

3) An inarticulate strangled sound (as of someone attempting to speak while under water. <He sinks at once, making a sound like glug-glug as he goes down.>

Origin: Noun first recorded in 1890–95, imitative. [[However, the OED lists quotes dating back to 1768!]]

verb (informal)

transitive: Pour or drink (liquid) with a hollow gurgling sound. <Jeff glugged whisky into glasses.>

intransitive: To make a glug — often reduplicated.<Glasses clinked … and the wine bottles glugged.>

Origin: Late 17th century: imitative [[However, the OED earliest intransitive quote is from 1895 and the transitive verb isn’t even listed]]

(Dictionary.com, Merriam-Webster’s Unabridged Dictionary, and OxfordDictionaries.com)

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The following quotes were found in archived sources:

<1993 “Salt pork was typically the only meat of the plantation slaves in the poor South, where the universal diet was hog and hominy and, for special treats, a ‘glug’ of molasses - a measurement taken from the sound of the molasses being poured.”—American Visions, 1 April>

<1998 “Next, you only glug down their special homemade quince or stinging nettle liquors if you want to be ill all night.”—The Mail on Sunday (London, England), 6 September>

<2003 “He first experienced grilled cheese in Italy several years ago, his curiosity piqued by a grilled smoked mozzarella served with a glug of olive oil and a smattering of salt and pepper.”—The Washington Post (D.C.), 17 September>

<2008 “Above all, Britons are drinking more. Alcohol consumption per person is nearly 70% higher than it was in 1970, mainly because women now glug almost as much as men.”—The Economist (US), 2 August>

<2014 “A clink of bottle against glass and a glorious glug-glug of liquid into glass.”—Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), 19 July>

<2018 “A good glug of red wine might inspire some frightful tales...”— Scotland on Sunday (Edinburgh), 28 October>
Note: The vast majority of the thousands of hits I got for ‘glug’ were from United Kingdom publications, which leads me to believe that it might be more popular there than in the US.
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Ken Greenwald — November 6, 2018
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Re: glug

Post by Erik_Kowal » Tue Nov 06, 2018 6:59 pm

Ken Greenwald wrote:
Tue Nov 06, 2018 6:47 pm
In trying to think of a synonym for ‘glug’ using its context, I had trouble coming up with one. ‘Drops’ seems too small. ‘Spoonfulls’ (teaspoon or tablespoon, is a possibility, but which is it?). ‘Thimbleful’ is also a possibility.
All the quantities you've considered seem too small.

I'd suggest 'a few splashes' for 'a few glugs'. Both wordings suggest a quantity that is sufficient to make itself noticed.

Possible also 'a liberal dash or two'.
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Re: glug

Post by Ken Greenwald » Tue Nov 06, 2018 7:14 pm

Thanks Erik,

Those suggestions fit well.
_____________________

Ken - November 6, 2018
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Re: glug

Post by trolley » Tue Nov 06, 2018 10:06 pm

I have nothing concrete to back it up but here's how they stack up, in my mind:
dash<splash<drizzle<glug.
I heard a British fellow ordering hot wings in our local pub. The waiter asked which level of heat he wanted.
"Oh, just a threat."
"Excuse me?"
"Just threaten them with the hot sauce."
I loved it. I guess a threat is somewhere between none at all and a dash.
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Re: glug

Post by gdwdwrkr » Tue Nov 06, 2018 10:19 pm

I suggest a scientific go at it - obtain a jug of maple syrup, and invert until the required number of glugs occurs, and measure. Isn't jug as onomatopoeic as glug? Maybe they share roots.
My question in this arena is: what is the word for the sound of a jug being filled as it nears full? Is it an axiom of Doppler-effect? I suppose it is a function of the echoes in the steadily-decreasing chamber, but I have never heard a word for it.
Glugging-down liquids probably goes before snorking-down solids, spare-ribs, for example.
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Re: glug

Post by BonnieL » Wed Nov 07, 2018 5:40 pm

Erik_Kowal wrote:
Tue Nov 06, 2018 6:59 pm
Ken Greenwald wrote:
Tue Nov 06, 2018 6:47 pm
In trying to think of a synonym for ‘glug’ using its context, I had trouble coming up with one. ‘Drops’ seems too small. ‘Spoonfulls’ (teaspoon or tablespoon, is a possibility, but which is it?). ‘Thimbleful’ is also a possibility.
All the quantities you've considered seem too small.

I'd suggest 'a few splashes' for 'a few glugs'. Both wordings suggest a quantity that is sufficient to make itself noticed.

Possible also 'a liberal dash or two'.
Splashes or dashes suggest a thinner liquid than glug. I usually measure fairly accurately (tho I'm fond of heaping teaspoons & tablespoons), but I do use squirts for my favorite fake sweetener. I've used it long enough that I know exactly how long to squeeze the bottle for the right amount of sweetening. Just made some panna cotta for tonight's dessert - 2 squirts is perfect. :)

It's funny how personal recipes can become. I've got quite a few that call for a shake, a sprinkle, a pinch, a dash, and so on. I've tried to come up with proper measurements, but I'm usually in a hurry by the time I'm adding my shake or dash.
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Re: glug

Post by trolley » Wed Nov 07, 2018 7:41 pm

One site I found claims that a glug equals about two tablespoons while another said that it equals two teaspoons. That's a big difference. When I studied baking, I apprenticed under an Englishman. He was amused when I asked what he meant when he referred to a "knob" of butter
"how much is that?"
"I don't know...it's a lump"
"how many grams?"
"It doesn't matter... it's either a large knob or a small knob."
"OK....thanks..."
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Re: glug

Post by gdwdwrkr » Thu Nov 08, 2018 4:18 pm

trolley wrote:
Wed Nov 07, 2018 7:41 pm
One site I found claims that a glug equals about two tablespoons while another said that it equals two teaspoons. That's a big difference. When I studied baking, I apprenticed under an Englishman. He was amused when I asked what he meant when he referred to a "knob" of butter
"how much is that?"
"I don't know...it's a lump"
"how many grams?"
"It doesn't matter... it's either a large knob or a small knob."
"OK....thanks..."
Around here, it's "the size of a walnut".
(How long is a piece of string?)
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Re: glug

Post by gdwdwrkr » Thu Nov 08, 2018 4:22 pm

BonnieL wrote:
Wed Nov 07, 2018 5:40 pm
Erik_Kowal wrote:
Tue Nov 06, 2018 6:59 pm
Ken Greenwald wrote:
Tue Nov 06, 2018 6:47 pm
In trying to think of a synonym for ‘glug’ using its context, I had trouble coming up with one. ‘Drops’ seems too small. ‘Spoonfulls’ (teaspoon or tablespoon, is a possibility, but which is it?). ‘Thimbleful’ is also a possibility.
All the quantities you've considered seem too small.

I'd suggest 'a few splashes' for 'a few glugs'. Both wordings suggest a quantity that is sufficient to make itself noticed.

Possible also 'a liberal dash or two'.
Splashes or dashes suggest a thinner liquid than glug. I usually measure fairly accurately (tho I'm fond of heaping teaspoons & tablespoons), but I do use squirts for my favorite fake sweetener. I've used it long enough that I know exactly how long to squeeze the bottle for the right amount of sweetening. Just made some panna cotta for tonight's dessert - 2 squirts is perfect. :)

It's funny how personal recipes can become. I've got quite a few that call for a shake, a sprinkle, a pinch, a dash, and so on. I've tried to come up with proper measurements, but I'm usually in a hurry by the time I'm adding my shake or dash.
Since I buckled-down and recorded the recipe for the huge kettle of chili I make once a year, I read that it calls for "three piles of chili-powder". Somehow it has turned out well every year.
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Re: glug

Post by tony h » Thu Nov 08, 2018 7:09 pm

One of my favourites is "threat". As in :
Guest: "I'll have a whiskey and water"
Host: "how much water?"
Guest: "just a threat"
A bit of laughing - if both parties understand.

It means : show it the water (threaten the whisky) but don't put any in.
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Signature: tony

I'm puzzled therefore I think.

Re: glug

Post by Bobinwales » Sun Nov 11, 2018 1:42 am

tony h wrote:
Thu Nov 08, 2018 7:09 pm
show it the water (threaten the whisky) but don't put any in.
I once read that W C Fields idea of a martini was to pour a gin into a glass and pass the vermouth cork over it.
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Signature: All those years gone to waist!
Bob in Wales

End of topic.
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