tuxedo

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tuxedo

Post by Archived Topic » Wed Apr 07, 2004 7:13 am

Penelope Kerr, australia
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tuxedo

Post by Archived Reply » Wed Apr 07, 2004 7:27 am

I am proud to say that New York is responsible for this invention. At least I know that it was named for a town about ten miles away from me called 'Tuxedo Park, N.Y. I did a quick search on an online encyclopedia and got squat but I know this to be true! The Merriam Webster online dictionary gives the following:

Tuxedo
function: noun
inflected forms: plural DOS or DOES
etymology: Tuxedo Park, N.Y.
Date: 1889
1: a single-breasted or double-breasted usually black or blackish blue jacket
2. semiformal evening clothes for men
BTW: Tuxedo is a beautiful town. My sister lived there for quite some time.
Reply from christine Gilpatrick (New Windsor - U.S.A.)
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Post by Archived Reply » Wed Apr 07, 2004 7:41 am

Question? Which came first the town or the tux? Where did the name Tuxedo originate. Is it Indian, Latin, Greek, Spanish, Mixtec, Mayan . . . ? Looks like field trip time to old Tuxedo Park, c! *G*
Reply from Leif Thorvaldson (Eatonville - U.S.A.)
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Post by Archived Reply » Wed Apr 07, 2004 7:56 am

19 th century : after a country club in Tuxedo Park, N.Y.
Christine is right.
Reply from Hélène GOMEZ (Brest - France)
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Post by Archived Reply » Wed Apr 07, 2004 8:10 am

Hélène: Of course christine is right! Only she didn't answer the origin of tuxedo. Certainly the apparel got its name from the town, but where did the word tuxedo come from? Why or how did the town get it's name and does it have a meaning? The question was "the origin of word tuxedo?" On a more personal note, Hélène, I wish to congratulate you on getting your capital "H" back. *G*
Reply from Leif Thorvaldson (Eatonville - U.S.A.)
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Post by Archived Reply » Wed Apr 07, 2004 8:25 am

Thank you, I do appreciate. I'm improving, aren't I ?
Reply from Hélène GOMEZ (Brest - France)
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Post by Archived Reply » Wed Apr 07, 2004 8:39 am

If the International Formalwear Association can be believed, Tuxedo comes from an Indian name for the chief in the area where Tuxedo Park is today located. (Although the area at one point had its named corrupted to "Duck Cedar," they say.) Read all about it at the website below.
http://www.formalwear.org/public/resources/tuxedo.html

--Lois Martin, Birmingham, Alabama
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Post by Archived Reply » Wed Apr 07, 2004 8:53 am

Way to go, Lois. Is this your first excursion into WooWooLand? In any event, welcome. I agree with your scepticism about the IFA being an authoritative source. Who can trust a stuffed (or boiled) shirt? *G*
Reply from Leif Thorvaldson (Eatonville - U.S.A.)
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Post by Archived Reply » Wed Apr 07, 2004 9:08 am

Acutally, I discovered the site looking for the origins of "the whole magillah" and posted to one old query (kyou-linary vs. cull-inary). Great site!

==Lois Martin, Birmingham, Alabama
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Post by Archived Reply » Wed Apr 07, 2004 9:22 am

Charles L. Cutler writes in _O Brave New Words!_ (1994): This town's Algonquian name probably means "round-foot-he-has," that is, "wolf."

From _The Merriam-Webster New Book of Word Histories_ (1991):

The Delawares of eastern North America belonged to one of three groups whose totems were the turkey, the turtle, and the wolf. _P'tuksit_, the Delaware word for 'wolf', was used as a name for the third group. In the eighteenth century European Americans gave the name of the _P'tuksit_, anglicized as _Tuxedo_, to a village in southern New York. In the 1880s a large and beautiful tract of land called Tuxedo Park, near the village and on the shore of Tuzedo Lake, became a fashionable resort community of the very wealthy. "There were a few men in sacks and cut-aways; but the most of them had dressed for the occasion, some ... with the black cravat and the hybrid jacket which is known as a 'Tuxedo coat.'" (_Harper's Magazine_, Sep. 1894)
Reply from Susumu Enomoto (Shiraokamachi - Japan)
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Post by Archived Reply » Wed Apr 07, 2004 9:37 am

Sorry for a typo.
"Tuzedo Lake" reads "Tuxedo Lake."
Reply from Susumu Enomoto (Shiraokamachi - Japan)
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Post by Archived Reply » Wed Apr 07, 2004 9:51 am

See, I told you we couldn't trust the IFA. *G* Good find, Susumu!
Reply from Leif Thorvaldson (Eatonville - U.S.A.)
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Post by Archived Reply » Wed Apr 07, 2004 10:05 am

Wow, finding all of this discussion about my Village. The Town of Tuxedo did derive its name from the Algonquian (Delaware)Indians. The totem of the local tribe was the wolf. In their language, wolf is named P'tuksit. When the area was settled by Europeans, as happened to many of the Native American words, P'tuksit was changed to Tuxed(o).

At the Autumn Ball (in the Village of Tuxedo Park), which kicks off the season, Griswold Lorillard appeared wearing the abbreviated coat. Despite the harsh reaction he received from the older residents, many saying he looked like a royal footman, the design became popular among the younger residents who began wearing the shortened coat to the Club on the shores of Tuxedo Lake. The press wrote about it, dubbing the new design the "Tuxedo" after Tuxedo Park where it was first worn in the United States.
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