This mullet ain't no fish

Discuss word origins and meanings.
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This mullet ain't no fish

Post by Wizard of Oz » Fri Dec 04, 2015 4:04 am

Gentlemen just recently I heard a particular style of dress called a mullet dress. I took one look at the dress and was in no doubt as to the etymology of the style. This is a wonderful example, and I am sure Ken has a word for it, where a style in one area has been translated to describe a style in another area.

I don't know if you are familiar with the mullet haircut. If not take a quick look here. The essential element of a mullet is that it is short at the front and long at the back. In Aus it is generally regarded as a bogan style of haircut. Now compare to the mullet dress. Is there any doubt.

It isn't taken as being the height of fashion by all women. This Kiwi writer puts my thoughts very well.
Right now as I bask in the 30-degree sun (cue an ever-so-slightly smug laugh), there’s an article sitting beside me from NZ women’s magazine Cleo debating the trend of the mullet dress. Worn by the likes of Jessica Alba I’m sure you’re all well aware of its credentials; it’s a mini-skirt at the front and a full on maxi-dress from the back – long and short, hence it’s ‘mullet’ nickname – and anything named after something as vomit-inducing as the mullet has surely got to be a fashion disaster?…Hasn’t it? I actually gave myself an accidental (with perhaps just a pinch of attention-seeking) mullet when I was five and if I’d been given a pair of scissors and one of my mum’s puffy dresses at the same time, I’m sure the result would’ve been something similar to the mullet dress. This isn’t fashion, it’s a fashion massacre. Am I the only one who thinks it looks like the front of the skirt is stuck in the wearer’s knickers? They’ll be adding toilet-roll soon and calling it a train. It’s no better than a theatre curtain that gets stuck on the encore and it’s about as flattering as, well, a mullet.
To my way of thinking a pair of scissors would solve the problem in both cases...hair and dress!

WoZ who prefers it short
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Signature: "The question is," said Alice, "whether you can make words mean so many different things."

Re: This mullet ain't no fish

Post by Ken Greenwald » Fri Dec 04, 2015 6:19 am

aaa
Wiz, you said:
The essential element of a mullet is that it is short at the front and long at the back. In Aus it is generally regarded as a bogan style of haircut.
For those of us not familiar with the term 'bogan' here is the Wikipedia definition:
BOGAN: The term bogan (/ˈboʊɡən/[1]) is an Australian and New Zealand slang word that can be used to describe a person with a lower working-class background, or whose speech, clothing, attitude and behaviour exemplify a gratified working class mentality and depending on the context, can be pejorative or self-deprecating.[2] The bogan person will generally lack sophistication and refinement.

Over the course of the last several decades, the bogan has become a very widespread and well recognised subculture, often as an example of bad taste.[3][4] Various localised names exist that describe the same or very similar groups of people.[5]
I don't know if we have a word for it other than "lower working-class" but it is perfectly clear what is meant.

I actually think that the mullet dress is kind of sexy (maybe that reveals my poor taste), but I've long been able to do without the mullet haircut style. (<:)

Ken – December 3, 2015 (peeking at mullet dresses)

PS: KInd of resembles Spanish-style dance dress (see here)
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Re: This mullet ain't no fish

Post by Bobinwales » Fri Dec 04, 2015 12:11 pm

It would look worse if she had put it on backwards.

Bobinwales, who wears a mullet that couldn't be any shorter on top!
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Signature: All those years gone to waist!
Bob in Wales

Re: This mullet ain't no fish

Post by BonnieL » Fri Dec 04, 2015 6:34 pm

The first time I heard someone's hairstyle called a mullet, I pictured him with a fish on his head. :)

I don't know what the dress was called in the past, but the style isn't new. I read about it in a book published in the '40s. Tho I think the front was described as knee length.
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Re: This mullet ain't no fish

Post by Phil White » Fri Dec 04, 2015 7:51 pm

BonnieL wrote:The first time I heard someone's hairstyle called a mullet, I pictured him with a fish on his head. :)

I don't know what the dress was called in the past, but the style isn't new. I read about it in a book published in the '40s. Tho I think the front was described as knee length.
"Waterfall skirt", "high-low hem". For the genesis of the style, have a look here.
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Non sum felix lepus

End of topic.
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