litter

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litter

Post by Bobinwales » Wed Aug 07, 2013 3:03 pm

I have been invited to a bit of a trek. Frankly, I am not known for using energy unnecessarily, so my immediate reaction was to ask if litters were to be provided.

Immediate think twice. The trek is through a rather beautiful area, and I have no doubt that litter will crop up as a subject to discuss. I changed my request to a sedan chair. but can't work out how a contraption to carry people (French "lit"?) can have the same name as a disgusting and thoughtless mess.
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Signature: All those years gone to waist!
Bob in Wales

Re:litter

Post by Erik_Kowal » Wed Aug 07, 2013 6:28 pm

Don't people usually bring their own puppies?
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Re: litter

Post by Bobinwales » Wed Aug 07, 2013 8:05 pm

Erik_Kowal wrote:Don't people usually bring their own puppies?
Bobinwales wrote:a disgusting and thoughtless mess.
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Signature: All those years gone to waist!
Bob in Wales

Re: litter

Post by Ken Greenwald » Wed Aug 07, 2013 10:13 pm

aaa
Bob, It all has to do with ‘straw.’

Here are the relevant definitions:

LITTER noun

1) [1730] Trash, wastepaper, or garbage lying scattered about.

2) [circa 1330] A covered and curtained couch provided with shafts and used for carrying a single passenger; [[Includes less elaborate versions, but I think you would go for the full monty. However, if that gets too exhausting you could always call for your stretcher.

3) [circa 1410] Material, such as straw, used as bedding for animals. [verb – To cover (a floor or other area) with straw, hay, etc., for litter.]

Etymology: English litter is a word of several meanings, but all are ultimately derived from that of lectus, ‘bed,’ coach. From lectus comes the French lit, ‘bed.’ Litiere, an Old French derivative of lit, was used not only for a bed but also for the type of vehicle we call a litter, a curtained coach on which a passenger reclines in comfort while being carried about on the shoulders of his retainers. The word’s main modern sense, which first emerged fully in the 18th century, derives from the notion of scattering straw over the floor for bedding.

(Merriam-Webster Online, American Heritage Dictionary, Random House Webster’s Unabridged Dictionary,The Barnhart Concise Dictionary of Etymology, Dictionary of Word Origins by John Ayto, and The Merriam-Webster New Book of Word Histories)

And that’s litterally the last straw! (>:)
___________________

Ken – August 8, 2013
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Re: litter

Post by trolley » Wed Aug 07, 2013 11:52 pm

But how many pups in a litter? I seem to have misplaced my metric conversion chart.
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Re: litter

Post by Edwin F Ashworth » Thu Aug 08, 2013 3:17 am

Stick to hounds sterling.
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End of topic.
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