apptitude for learning

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apptitude for learning

Post by Keeper » Sat Jul 10, 2010 6:33 pm

I'm looking for an adjective which means "apptitude for learning". Intellect is the closest I can find, but it's a noun. Any ideas?
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Re: Apptitude for Learning

Post by Bobinwales » Sat Jul 10, 2010 9:08 pm

Philomathy?
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Re: Apptitude for Learning

Post by christinecornwall » Sat Jul 10, 2010 10:29 pm

Keeper I may be stating the obvious, but wouldn't this work?

Main Entry: 1in·tel·lec·tu·al
Pronunciation: \ˌin-tə-ˈlek-chə-wəl, -chəl, -shwəl, -chü(-ə)l\
Function: adjective
Date: 14th century
1 a : of or relating to the intellect or its use b : developed or chiefly guided by the intellect rather than by emotion or experience : rational c : requiring use of the intellect <intellectual games>
2 a : given to study, reflection, and speculation b : engaged in activity requiring the creative use of the intellect <intellectual playwrights>

— in·tel·lec·tu·al·i·ty \-ˌlek-chə-ˈ
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Re: Apptitude for Learning

Post by Erik_Kowal » Sat Jul 10, 2010 11:22 pm

Try 'teachable', 'educable', 'intelligent', 'gifted', 'adept'.
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Re: Apptitude for Learning

Post by Ken Greenwald » Sun Jul 11, 2010 1:01 am

Keeper, The best match I can think of as far as the concept goes is QUICK STUDY, although it is two words and not an adjective. But I suppose it could be made into the awkward adjective quick-study, as in a quick-study pupil/student.

Possible more legitimate adjectives that come to mind are: quick-witted; quick-of-mind; bright.
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Re: Apptitude for Learning

Post by Phil White » Sun Jul 11, 2010 1:46 am

"Intelligent" also means (among other things) able to learn.

As a predicative adjective "quick to learn" ("He/she is quick to learn").
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Re: Apptitude for Learning

Post by Ken Greenwald » Sun Jul 11, 2010 7:35 pm

As some may have noticed, grammar and punctuation have never been my long suit. But, in light of Phil's above construction (“He/she is quick to learn."), I'm wondering if I might not have had to go through the contortions I did above to produce the adjective.

In order to make quick-study an adjective, I did what I did. But I'm wondering if I could have invoked the 'predicate adjective,' as Phil did above, if I said: "He/she is a quick-study.'

It strikes me, though, that "a quick study" is a noun phrase and not an adjectival phrase (or predicate adjective) and therefor may not produce the adjective form that Keeper requested.

I like quick-study because it is commonly used here to mean quick to learn, which does imply an aptitude for learning. But I'm wondering if perhaps this is an Americanism which isn't commonly used in the U.K.

Enlightenment from folks who are more knowledgeable on this sort of thing would be appreciated.
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Re: Apptitude for Learning

Post by trolley » Sun Jul 11, 2010 8:47 pm

Whenever I hear “quick study” used in conversation I think “ That could easily mean something else.”
It sounds like it could mean that he is easy (for someone) to understand, or easy to figure out or get to know. That book was a quick read. That problem is an easy fix. That girl was an easy lay. Of course, no self-respecting cowboys would want to be known as “quick drawers” but, as a “quick draw” they might just be easy to render as a cartoon.
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Re: Aptitude for Learning

Post by Ken Greenwald » Sun Jul 11, 2010 11:12 pm

John (a.k.a. trolley), QUICK STUDY has always had but one meaning for me – the person learns fast. Don’t worry about Jack coming up to speed to do the job, he’s a quick study.

Evidently, the expression first appeared in theater and then as the OED says (see below) “transferred to general contexts.”

QUICK STUDY:

MERRIAM-WEBSTER’S UNABRIDGED DICTIONARY[/i] noun: One that can speedily learn the essentials of something to be done; especially : a performer (as an actor, musician) with a gift for learning with remarkable speed new material (as lines, stage business, scores).

RANDOM HOUSE WEBSTER’S UNABRIDGED DICTIONARY: 1) Someone who is able to learn a new job or adjust to a new social environment in a short time. 2) An actor who can learn lines and become proficient in a role on short notice.

ENCARTA QUICK LEARNER noun: Fast learner: a fast learner of something.

MACMILLAN ENGLISH DICTIONARY: Someone who learns very quickly.

FREEDICTIONARY.COM: Someone able to acquire new knowledge and skills rapidly and easily.

OXFORD ENGLISH DICTIONARY: Theatre: The action of committing to memory one's part in a play. Hence, to have or be a quick, slow, etc. study, to be quick, slow, etc. in learning by heart; also transferred to general contexts.
<1838 “I've got a part of twelve lengths here, which I must be up in to-morrow night . . . I'm a confounded quick study, that's one comfort.”— The life and adventures of Nicholas Nickleby by Dickens, xxiii>

“1857 “The course of true love never did run smooth, Art 128 “Having what is called a very quick study, she was soon mistress of the twenty or thirty lines.”— READE The Course of True Love Never Did Run Smooth by C. Reade, page 128>

<1900”Muriel is master of six pieces already, as perhaps you know; and all the other children are quick studies.—”Three Men on Bummel by J. K. Jerome, i. page13>

<1954 “She had learnt something in these last few days. She was a quick study.”—Heart Untouched M. EWER, ix. page164>

<1974 “We'll brush him up. He's a quick study. He's not a Neanderthal.”— The Glory of the Hummingbird by P. De Vries, xiii. Page 197>

<1989 “. . . this former district judge in Dallas has moved easily to her new role as an anchor. Maybe she is a quick study, or maybe it's not that tough a job.”—New York Times, 23 October>

<2006 “This stripling of 21 [sc. T. S. Eliot] is clearly one quick study, already a dab hand at reconstituting the sound and sense of symbolist vers libre and cutting-edge imagism into a stripped-down American idiom.”—Boston Globe (Nexis), 1 January>

<2010 “The issues facing county supervisors are complex. It takes time to master them. Fortunately, McGill is a quick study who understands many of the important details. We think he'll come up to speed rapidly. Oakland Tribune (California), 13 April>

(quotes from Oxford English Dictionary and archived sources)
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Ken – July 11, 2010
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Re: Apptitude for Learning

Post by trolley » Mon Jul 12, 2010 12:15 am

For sure, there's no doubt about what everyone means . It just always seems to trip my "Hmmm?" switch.
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Re: Apptitude for Learning

Post by Phil White » Mon Jul 12, 2010 1:52 am

Me Brit. Never heard it.
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