money and geese

Discuss word origins and meanings.
Post Reply

money and geese

Post by Archived Topic » Tue May 25, 2004 11:17 pm

the english word "money" has something to do with geese. what is it? Bonus question on a college quiz!!
Submitted by ( - )
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: Topic imported and archived

money and geese

Post by Archived Reply » Tue May 25, 2004 11:32 pm

Foie gras!
Reply from Natalio Elta (Paris - France)
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: Reply imported and archived

money and geese

Post by Archived Reply » Tue May 25, 2004 11:46 pm

You will have to pardon Natalio, he must have eaten too much!

See http://money.zezenetwork.com/articles/o ... _money.htm

If you win the quiz, scatter some coins this way!
Reply from Erik Kowal ( - England)
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: Reply imported and archived

money and geese

Post by Archived Reply » Wed May 26, 2004 12:01 am

With this knowledge he should make a mint of money.
Reply from Melvyn Goodman (London - England)
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: Reply imported and archived

money and geese

Post by Archived Reply » Wed May 26, 2004 12:15 am

Natalio was almost there. The answer is of course "The oie with the foie that laid the golden egg."

Ken Greenwald (Fort Collins, Colorado - USA)
Reply from ( - )
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: Reply imported and archived

money and geese

Post by Archived Reply » Wed May 26, 2004 12:29 am

oie vey.
Reply from Shay Simmons (Colfax - U.S.A.)
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: Reply imported and archived

money and geese

Post by Archived Reply » Wed May 26, 2004 12:44 am

To put it another way, Ken:

C'est l'oie au foie aux oeufs d'or, quoi?
Reply from Erik Kowal ( - England)
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: Reply imported and archived

money and geese

Post by Archived Reply » Wed May 26, 2004 12:58 am

Erik,

That's exactly right with the pate thrown in just to keep time, time, time in a sort of Runic rhyme.

Ken Greenwald (Fort Collins, Colorado - U.S.A.)
Reply from ( - )
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: Reply imported and archived

money and geese

Post by Archived Reply » Wed May 26, 2004 1:13 am

one might ask the eternal question, which came first, the oie or the foie?
Reply from Shay Simmons (Colfax - U.S.A.)
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: Reply imported and archived

money and geese

Post by Archived Reply » Wed May 26, 2004 1:27 am

Heavens, there really is a real answer, which I just stumbled upon by happenstance - not quite as imaginative as our idle musings, but not bad:

The English word money is believed to come from the Italian word moneta which has an interesting history. Today the word means coin, but in ancient Rome, and perhaps even earlier in Greece, the word meant advisor, one who warns, or one who makes people remember.

There are several accounts of how the meaning of the word changed based on a similar story about the goddess Juno, who presided over many aspects of life. One of these aspects was an advisor of the Roman people, therefore one of the goddess's names was Juno Moneta.

A flock of geese in a sanctuary of Juno's on the Capitoline Hill squawked the alarm that saved Rome from an invasion of Gauls in 390 B.C. A temple was built in honor of Juno Moneta at the site because her sacred geese had "warned" of the attack.

The first Roman mint was built in or adjacent to the temple in 289 B.C. originally producing bronze and later silver coins. Many of these coins were struck with the head of Juno Moneta on the face. Whether this was done in tribute or to identify the mint is not known, but moneta came to be the word for both coin and mint, and eventually the word money.

Ken Greenwald (Fort Collins, Colorado - U.S.A.)

Reply from ( - )
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: Reply imported and archived

ACCESS_END_OF_TOPIC
Post Reply