French kiss

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French kiss

Post by Archived Topic » Mon Mar 15, 2004 10:22 pm

Do the French really have the patent on open-mouthed kissing with one's tongue?? Is there a historical basis for this term or is it a new American slang term?

Thanks
Ardeis
Clearwater, FL
Submitted by Ardeis Scott (Clearwater - U.S.A.)
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French kiss

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Mar 15, 2004 10:37 pm

May I answer my own question?? I came across this in a Sexual Trivia paperback I had.

The French Kiss was originally known as "maraichinage" to describe the prlonged deep tongue kiss practiced by the Marichins, inhabitants of Brittany, France.
Reply from Ardeis Scott (Clearwater - U.S.A.)
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French kiss

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Mar 15, 2004 10:51 pm

Can you also tell whether a novice in this erotic art was known to possess a 'maraichino cherry'?
Reply from Erik Kowal (Reading - England)
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French kiss

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Mar 15, 2004 11:05 pm

Never seen any such thing in Brittany (despite my long experience of that land). Hélène, any comment?
Reply from Natalio Elta (Paris - France)
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French kiss

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Mar 15, 2004 11:20 pm

Well, I'm afraid not, really.
I had never heard of that before - I mean what Ardeis refers to as the " maraichinage" - , and I would like to know where he found that "interesting information". So, Ardeis, could you let us know what your sources are? As far as the adjective "French" is concerned...I dare not imagine what other questions you could ask later on....

By the way, it was nice to read you again, Natalio.
Reply from Hélène GOMEZ (BREST - France)

My "reference" is "The Comlete Book of Sexual Trivia" byt Leslee Welch.....

Ardeis
Reply from Ardeis Scott (Clearwater - U.S.A.)
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French kiss

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Mar 15, 2004 11:34 pm

Upon further research into this amiable subject, I found the following at http://www.abcdating.com/kisses.htm a page purporting to identify Kissing:the top 12 kisses of all time.
Kisses lasting minutes are unusual, kisses lasting hours quite remarkable. There is a type of kiss called "maraichinage" - after the Maraichins or inhabitants of the district Pays de Mont in the Vendee (Britanny) which quite literally lasts for hours.
So Natalio, are you holding out on us?
Reply from Charles Becker (Murray KY - U.S.A.)
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French kiss

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Mar 15, 2004 11:49 pm

What must the toiling researcher not be forced to endure in the course of his long travails...

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http://www.abcdating.com/kisses.htm

There is a type of kiss called "maraichinage" - after the Maraichins or inhabitants of the district Pays de Mont in the Vendee (Britanny) which quite literally lasts for hours.

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http://www.theadultplaypen.com/facts.htm

(A compendium of sexual trivia.)

The "French Kiss" was first known as maraichinage, a term to describe the prolonged, deep, tongue kiss practiced by the Maraichins, inhabitants of Brittany, France.

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http://www.asiaflash.com/astro/baiser-02.html

(A French astrology site (!) )

"Le baiser d'amour est riche en variations. Depuis un léger effleurage avec les lèvres ou les bords des lèvres, il parcourt toute la gamme d'intensité de l'attouchement, jusqu'au "maraichinage", où les deux partenaires promènent leur langue, pendant un temps assez long, dans la cavité buccale l'un de l'autre."

I have translated this as follows:

"The erotic kiss is rich in its diversity. It spans the entire range of intensity of touch, from a delicate brush with the lips - or the edges of the lips - to the 'maraichinage', where each participant allows his or her tongue to wander at length through the mouth of the other."

Further comments follow:

"Il est certain que ce ne sont pas les baisers les plus "profonds" qui provoquent toujours les excitations les plus violentes, comme il n'est pas douteux que, pour le baiser d'amour, la maîtrise réside non seulement dans une certaine retenue, mais surtout dans les nuances.

La langue est, en l'occurrence, un instrument indispensable, et le baiser lingual une des variantes les plus importantes du baiser. Quoiqu'il puisse être donné parfois d'une manière plus énergique, par l'introduction profonde de la langue dans la bouche du partenaire, il sera pourtant, dans le raffinement de sa graduation, tout à fait différent du procédé grossier des Maraichins, qui ne convient qu'à des individus peu cultivés. Le baiser lingual, au contraire, devient cause des plus fortes excitations, quand le bout de la langue exerce un chatouillement fin et délicat sur la commissure des lèvres et sur le bout de la langue du partenaire."

In English:

"It is a fact that the deepest kisses do not always give rise to the strongest stimulation. Equally, the skill of the erotic kiss depends not only on a degree of self-control, but particularly on the nuances.

For this, the tongue is an essential tool, and the tongue kiss is one of the chief types of kiss. Although it can sometimes be energetically delivered by thrusting the tongue deeply into the mouth of one's partner, it will still differ markedly in the finesse with which it is applied from the coarse approach of the Maraichins, which is only suitable for those entirely lacking in sensibility. The tongue kiss, on the contrary, arouses much greater excitement as the tip of the tongue subtly and delicately tickles the corners of the lips and the tip of one's partner's tongue."

So much for the French kiss. If anyone had any doubts beforehand, this just goes to show the value of going to the horse's mouth...
Reply from Erik Kowal (Reading - England)
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French kiss

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Mar 16, 2004 12:32 am

I see in the Archives that French kissing has been compared to a tradition called "maraichinage" and I wish to comment briefly on this.

"Maraichinage" is not French kissing and is not linked with Brittany.

1/ "Le marais poitevin", where the people are called "maraichin" was in the province of Poitou, not Brittany. Vendée is the name of a departement (post 1789) which covers part of Poitou. Marais means Marshes.

2/ "Maraichinage" was an excellent tradition which allowed young people to practise advanced flirting before marriage. Etchings or postcards usually show them under a very large umbrella. So details are lost to the outsiders.
No doubt French kissing was part of the preliminaries. I would not be surprised if Maraichinage went a lot further.
It was said to give better results than "mariage arrangé" - standard practise before WW1, when parents and relatives did the selection,
rather than the young people concerned.
It has not disappeared but, I believe, extended to the whole of Western Europe, and possibly further... without the umbrella.

3/ French kissing is probably older than the French. Was it, like soap, invented by the Gauls? It could be even older. Do we know anything about the Egyptians' kissing practices ?
Submitted by Jean Paul Corbasson (I4111 Louvigny - France)

Jean Paul, Thanks for the interesting discussion. Who knows, it could date back to Adam and Eve. Terrific invention, though, and I highly recommend such enhancements as chocolate or Bailey’s Irish Cream – the possibilities are endless.

The first appearance in print of the words ‘French Kiss’ (according to the OED) was in the book ‘Le Slang’ published in Paris in 1923 by J. Manchon in which he defines ‘French kiss’ as ‘baiser très appuyé.’ When I put this through a translation program what came out was the apparently slightly mangled “to kiss very supported.” I’m curious what a proper translation of this would be. Would you or another French speaker be so kind as to upgrade this translation just a tad. Thanks.
______________________

Ken G – February 19, 2004
Reply from Ken Greenwald (Fort Collins, CO - U.S.A.)

Ken, "appuyé" here would be in the sense of thorough, not supported.
Reply from jim Ransom (London - England)

Thanks Jim. That definition now makes sense.

Ken – February 20, 2004
Reply from Ken Greenwald (Fort Collins, CO - U.S.A.)

appuyer = (fig.) to insist (according to my very old Cassel's New (!) dictionnary.
It reminds me of a quote "Glissez, mortels, n'appuyez pas 8" but I should ask a French Word Wizzard where it comes from. It was used as an invitation not to ask for more information on "risqué" matters. Unless one of our learned collegues ...
Reply from Jean Paul Corbasson (I4111 Louvigny - France)

Jean Paul, I'd like very much to see something like a French Wordwizard...
Reply from Natalio Elta (Paris - France)
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