'No problem' instead of 'You're welcome!'

Discuss word origins and meanings.

'No problem' instead of 'You're welcome!'

Post by Archived Topic » Sun Mar 14, 2004 2:56 am

Note: This posting is a merging of 4 groupings of postings on the same topic, arranged in chronological order. The time stamp above says 2004, but that was for the 1st grouping and is not the date it was created – it is the date it was transferred from our old site to the present one. The estimated date from its URL is circa 2000-2001. The time stamps on the other 3 groupings are correct. To begin, I have listed here the question asked in each grouping. -- Forum Moderator]

'No problem' instead of 'You're welcome!'
Posted on: circa 2001-2002
Why are people today responding to "Thank You" with "No Problem" rather than "You're welcome."
Submitted by ( - )
__________________________________________

Responses to thank you
Posted on: 24 Jun 2006 20:22
I'm trying to find out when 'no problem', 'sure', 'anytime', 'yep', and the like, began to replace 'you're welcome'. Or were any of these in use earlier? Would love a response from Ken Greenwald and anyone else with info or ideas.
_________________

sass (Susan Lacasse)
__________________________________________

Use of the phrase "No Problem"
Posted on: 13 Jul 2006 14:05
When is and when is not to use the word "no problem"

Consider the following scenario

Customer: Could I please have a beer?
Bar Tender: No Problem.

Ofcourse there shouldn't be a problem considering this is a bar
Or why should there be a problem gettin' a beer at the bar

Y'all get what I am sayin'?

_________________

Ruffraggedyraw (DirtyMac)
__________________________________________

welcome vs no problem
Posted on: 16 May 2007 08:59
Hi,

Pls tell me the difference in meaning between:

1/ You are welcome.
b/ No problems.

Are they interchangeable?

Thanks

Quoc
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: Topic imported and archived

'No problem' instead of 'You're welcome!'

Post by Archived Reply » Sun Mar 14, 2004 3:10 am

AMERICAN HERITAGE DICTIONARY

NO PROBLEM 1) Also, NO SWEAT; NOT TO WORRY. There's no difficulty about this, don't concern yourself. For example, "Of course I can change your tire—no problem," or "You want more small change? no sweat," or "We'll be there in plenty of time, not to worry." The first of these colloquial terms dates from about 1960 and the second from about 1950. The third, originating in Britain in the 1930s and using 'not to' with the sense of “don't,” crossed the Atlantic in the 1970s. 2) You're welcome, as in "Thanks for the ride, Dad.—No problem." [Late 1900s]
Reply from Charles Becker (Murray KY - U.S.A.)
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: Reply imported and archived

'No problem' instead of 'You're welcome!'

Post by Archived Reply » Sun Mar 14, 2004 3:25 am

Also shortened to "no probs".
Reply from Meirav Barkan (London - England)
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: Reply imported and archived

'No problem' instead of 'You're welcome!'

Post by Archived Reply » Sun Mar 14, 2004 3:39 am

Not to overlook 'no problemo!".
Reply from Erik Kowal (Reading - England)
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: Reply imported and archived

'No problem' instead of 'You're welcome!'

Post by Archived Reply » Sun Mar 14, 2004 3:53 am

Or "pas de probleme" for those who wish to sound as if they know French.
Reply from Meirav Barkan (London - England)
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: Reply imported and archived

'No problem' instead of 'You're welcome!'

Post by Archived Reply » Sun Mar 14, 2004 4:08 am

Or 'pas de problème!' for those who actually do.
Reply from Erik Kowal (Reading - England)
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: Reply imported and archived

responses to 'Thank you'

Post by susan lacasse » Sun Jun 25, 2006 4:22 am

[Second grouping question -- Forum Moderator]

I'm trying to find out when 'no problem', 'sure', 'anytime', 'yep', and the like, began to replace 'you're welcome'. Or were any of these in use earlier? Would love a response from Ken Greenwald and anyone else with info or ideas.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: sass

responses to 'Thank you'

Post by Wizard of Oz » Tue Jun 27, 2006 12:25 pm

.. now Ken here is a Dorothy Dixer if ever I saw one !!! .. go on get up on your feet and answer the lovely lady .. philibust to your hearts content ..

WoZ
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: "The question is," said Alice, "whether you can make words mean so many different things."

responses to 'Thank you'

Post by gdwdwrkr » Tue Jun 27, 2006 12:38 pm

Ken?
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

responses to 'Thank you'

Post by paulwiggins » Wed Jun 28, 2006 5:51 am

susan lacasse wrote: I'm trying to find out when 'no problem', 'sure', 'anytime', 'yep', and the like, began to replace 'you're welcome'.
They haven't on ny watch, even though by the standards of most of you I don't stand on ceremony.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

responses to 'Thank you'

Post by Erik_Kowal » Wed Jun 28, 2006 8:21 am

I'm unable to think of anyone here (excepting the occasional polite newcomer and one or two others -- you know who you are) afflicted with the possession of good manners.

I woud go so far as to assert that J-P Sartre would find the anti-bourgeois ethos that prevails here a vindication of his own values. What greater tribute than that could there be to our collective cultural superiority?
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: -- Looking up a word? Try OneLook's metadictionary (--> definitions) and reverse dictionary (--> terms based on your definitions)8-- Contribute favourite diary entries, quotations and more here8 -- Find new postings easily with Active Topics8-- Want to research a word? Get essential tips from experienced researcher Ken Greenwald

responses to 'Thank you'

Post by spiritus » Wed Jun 28, 2006 8:42 am

Thank you.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: Che Baraka

responses to 'Thank you'

Post by Erik_Kowal » Wed Jun 28, 2006 8:56 am

Je vous en prie.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: -- Looking up a word? Try OneLook's metadictionary (--> definitions) and reverse dictionary (--> terms based on your definitions)8-- Contribute favourite diary entries, quotations and more here8 -- Find new postings easily with Active Topics8-- Want to research a word? Get essential tips from experienced researcher Ken Greenwald

responses to 'Thank you'

Post by spiritus » Thu Jun 29, 2006 12:08 am

Les chiens aboient, la caravane passe.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: Che Baraka

responses to 'Thank you'

Post by russcable » Thu Jun 29, 2006 4:21 pm

Conversational French: Merci - De rien.
Conversational Spanish: Gracias - De nada.
...
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

Post Reply