She didn’t take off her boots yet

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She didn’t take off her boots yet

Post by JerrySmile » Mon Jun 15, 2009 12:41 pm

This seems Irish, but couldn't find any decisive explanation:

She’s a good woman, but she didn’t take off her boots yet.

Some think it's about her still living, others that she has kept her rural roots.

Thanks.
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Re: She didn’t take off her boots yet

Post by trolley » Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:06 pm

Here's a couple of thoughts. Still being alive doesn't make much sense in that sentence.
"She's a good woman, but she hasn't died yet"? If you think about the "Die with your boots on" idiom, it means to die somehere (anywhere) other than in bed. Maybe she hasn't been to bed , yet (still a virgin). Maybe she hasn't been married, yet (barefoot and pregnant). Maybe she hasn't hung up her boots yet and settled down. She could still be running around or still playing the game.
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Re: She didn’t take off her boots yet

Post by PhilHunt » Mon Jun 15, 2009 7:00 pm

The fact that it uses past simple and not present perfect makes me think that it isn't Irish but American. Perhaps I'm wrong though. Where did you find it Jerry?
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Re: She didn’t take off her boots yet

Post by Phil White » Tue Jun 16, 2009 12:51 am

I agree (slightly) with Phil. Simple past with "yet" is a sign of US English rather than British English. Having said that, it is, as you suggest, also common in Irish English and may have gone into US English from Irish English.

For British speakers, the use of the simple past with "yet" is simply illiterate (or Irish or American).
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Re: She didn’t take off her boots yet

Post by JerrySmile » Tue Jun 16, 2009 2:36 am

-----
She's a good woman, but she didn't take off her boots yet.

What Can You Say About That Then?!
Let the Sayings of Ireland be your guide!


http://mysite.verizon.net/cbladey/irish ... saids.html
-----
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Re: She didn’t take off her boots yet

Post by Erik_Kowal » Tue Jun 16, 2009 3:24 am

The word order sounds unusual to my ear. It may possibly be normal in Irish English, but I am sure that most UK speakers of Standard English would prefer "She didn’t take her boots off yet" to "She didn’t take off her boots yet". They would feel even happier with "She hasn't taken her boots off yet".
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Re: She didn’t take off her boots yet

Post by JerrySmile » Tue Jun 16, 2009 10:11 pm

I am LOL:-)

Could this answer be true?

-------------
It’s a mis-print, it should be ‘boobs’ not ‘boots’.

It’s a reference to the traditional use of bust enhancement in some areas of the West of Ireland during festivals, dances and gatherings, to increase a woman’s attractiveness. Roughly translated, it means you don’t know
who you’ve got till you get past the window-dressing.
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I got it on an Irish forum.
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Re: She didn’t take off her boots yet

Post by trolley » Tue Jun 16, 2009 10:16 pm

You never know what you're up against when a woman puts up a false front.
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Re: She didn’t take off her boots yet

Post by Erik_Kowal » Tue Jun 16, 2009 10:56 pm

Discovering that a woman's bust has been enhanced is the opposite of titillating.
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Re: She didn’t take off her boots yet

Post by Shelley » Sat Jun 20, 2009 10:56 pm

A disguise to de-flatten, once discovered, is deflating.
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Re: She didn’t take off her boots yet

Post by Wizard of Oz » Sun Jun 21, 2009 9:03 am

There was a buxom Irish lass,
Siobhan was her name,
She went to the craic one night,
To bounce herself to fame.
She flipped 'em, she flopped 'em,
But when morning came,
Siobhan was all deflated,
Oh what a shame!


.. not to mention how young Sean felt .. or rather hadn't felt ..

WoZ in silicon valley
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Re: She didn’t take off her boots yet

Post by tony h » Sat Aug 15, 2015 10:02 pm

I was reminded of WoZ resting in Silicon Valley as I read "to be buxom and obedient to the laws of the land" (G. Borrow, 1843).

Clearly no reference here to mounds either natural or of silicon. Simple the notion of bending to the law. So somewhere the meaning has changed.
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Signature: tony

With the right context almost anything can sound appropriate.

End of topic.
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