IKinda

Discuss word origins and meanings.

Re: IKinda

Post by PhilHunt » Tue Apr 15, 2008 10:14 am

Give me a break Bob, I haven't slept more than 2 hours in 2 days.
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Re: IKinda

Post by gdwdwrkr » Tue Apr 15, 2008 10:39 am

Or, as Benjamin Franklin might have said, "Gimme a break...."
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Re: IKinda

Post by kagriffy » Tue Apr 15, 2008 1:04 pm

Ben Franklin liked Kit Kat bars?
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Re: IKinda

Post by PhilHunt » Tue Apr 15, 2008 1:08 pm

Was he a member of the Kit Kat Klan?
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Re: IKinda

Post by Bobinwales » Tue Apr 15, 2008 2:03 pm

PhilHunt wrote:Give me a break Bob, I haven't slept more than 2 hours in 2 days.
If you want to really lose sleep, just wait until you have a teenager who hasn't come home! You ain't had nuttin yet!
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Re: IKinda

Post by Wizard of Oz » Wed Apr 16, 2008 2:19 am

.. Kate Burridge, in one of her books, points out that colloquial English has many of these contracted expressions, gonna, wanna, hafta, and lists them as being marginal modals or semi-modals .. actually she prefers to call them quasi modals with an image of verbs hanging from bell towers .. *grin* ..

.. PhilH, Burridge discusses the "Conservatism of American English" on several occasions in her book and demonstrates how differences in pronunciation and spelling can often be traced to things that happened in the UK post-tea party and therefore were not transported to the US .. she states that "many of the linguistic features we think of as being characteristically American are conservative." .. but it is also necessary to grasp the idea that just because something is an archaic usage does not make it more correct than current usage ..

WoZ of Aus 16/04/08
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Re: IKinda

Post by Wizard of Oz » Wed Apr 16, 2008 5:01 am

.. in thinking about what jerzy had posted, from Poland, I wondered if what he had run across was the internet usage of /I/ or /i/ as a modern prefix that denotes internet .. if you google on <ikinda/ikeep> you come across thousands of goohits that incorporate these words as a part of a webcompany or website name ..

.. also there are goohits that appear to be just typos where ikinda/ikeep/iknow are prevalent .. now given the keystrokes required for /i/ followed by <space> followed by /k/ I think it would not be all that unusual for the <space> strike to be missed .. but the more I read pages and pages of posts the more I come to the conclusion that ikinda/ikeep + [verb] is now becoming a non-standard construction ..

.. and mysteriously I ran across this posting on a website in a language that might be Polish?? .. not sure .. that if you read it there are a couple of words that seem familiar .. I have underlined and bolded them ..
Witam,
Od czasu do czasu spotykam się z takimi słówkami jak IKinda, IKeep, etc.
Czy IKinda to I am a kind of... ? Jeśli jest to "zbitka" to dlaczego K
jest pisane z dużej litery?
Oczywiście mam świadomość, że nie jest to angielski salonowy, raczej
saloonowy. Pozdrawiam JS
.. maybe this is an international question ??

WoZ kinda in Aus 16/04/08
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Re: IKinda

Post by gdwdwrkr » Wed Apr 16, 2008 9:40 am

WoZ, you raise interesting questions. My attention was caught by "things that happened in the UK post-tea party and therefore were not transported to the US", which reminded me of the spice-box, which went out of style over there around the time of Queen Anne, but kept chugging along here right through the Federal period, into the 1820s. Will have to keep an eye out for similar word-survivors.
Um gonna hafta git wunna them Burridge-books.
I was also starting to wonder about the English tradition of partying after-tea...
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Re: IKinda

Post by Bobinwales » Wed Apr 16, 2008 9:51 am

Does not FALL come into the category of being used in the American Colonies having been taken there by British Immigrants but was then overtaken by AUTUMN here?
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Re: IKinda

Post by gdwdwrkr » Wed Apr 16, 2008 10:48 am

Both are used, but fall comes up more often in casual conversation.
Fall leaves you with a woodsy scent. Autumn smells more like a calendar.
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Re: IKinda

Post by Bobinwales » Wed Apr 16, 2008 11:17 am

We never, ever, say fall meaning autumn, with the single exception of the mnemonic “Spring forward, fall back” when we mess about with the clocks.
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Re: IKinda

Post by PhilHunt » Wed Apr 16, 2008 12:00 pm

Wizard of Oz wrote:.. Kate Burridge, in one of her books, points out that colloquial English has many of these contracted expressions, gonna, wanna, hafta, and lists them as being marginal modals or semi-modals .. actually she prefers to call them quasi modals with an image of verbs hanging from bell towers .. *grin* ..
Shouldn't that read colloquial American English.
In the UK we never use gonna, wanna, hafta, and, it is never used in UK literature to denote accent or regional dialect either. It is a very American usage which, according to Mr. Bragg's book, is a survivor of the dialect brought over with the pilgrim fathers.
Do not be mistaken in thinking that it was used by everyone though as American immigration came in several waves from many regions of the world not just Portsmouth and each of these would have brought their own dialects.
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Re: IKinda

Post by russcable » Wed Apr 16, 2008 4:07 pm

PhilHunt wrote:Shouldn't that read colloquial American English.
In the UK we never use gonna, wanna, hafta,
You gotta mouse in your pocket, innit? The Proclaimers, two nice lads from Scotland, say:
"And if I haver
Yeah I know I'm gonna be
I'm gonna be the man
Who's havering next to you" - I'm Gonna Be (500 Miles)
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Re: IKinda

Post by PhilHunt » Wed Apr 16, 2008 4:16 pm

Are you reproducing the lyrics as they are printed or how you hear them?

I don't hear the Proclaimers say 'you gotta' but 'ya gatta (or gada) and it's not pronounced gonna but 'gunna'. If they have chosen to write the lyrics using gotta and gonna it is probably because it follows in a tradition of song writing, the same as the use of 'ain't' instead of 'isn't' by nice middle class singers. This goes back to my earlier post about song lyrics. Song lyrics are not literature.
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Re: IKinda

Post by gdwdwrkr » Wed Apr 16, 2008 5:45 pm

PhilHunt wrote: Song lyrics are not literature.
is what I'd call a highly-subjective statement, and basically incorrect. No definition I have found says any such thing.

But if you are writing of the words to what I have called "alleged music", then I'm with you.
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