IKinda

Discuss word origins and meanings.

IKinda

Post by jerzy » Fri Apr 11, 2008 8:53 pm

Hello,
first of all I'd like to tell that English is not the native language of mine so please forgive me all inaccuracies.
From time to time I meet such words like IKinda, IKeep and some other but all of them start with IK. I guess that it is rather a kind of "saloon" English or slang. I'd like to ask about origin of these words and their meaning. And the next question is: if finally it is a single word why the "K" is written as a capital.
Thank you
jerzy
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Re: IKinda

Post by Bobinwales » Fri Apr 11, 2008 9:37 pm

IKinda is not a word. "I kind of", as in "I kind of like that" is slang English meaning "That thing quite appeals to me".

The K should not be capitalised under any circumstances whatsoever when it is the second letter of a word, unless the whole word is written in capitals.
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Re: IKinda

Post by trolley » Fri Apr 11, 2008 9:42 pm

Hi jerzy
I’ve heard those terms used many times , but I don’t ever recall seeing them written as single words. Yes, it is slang or “lazy” English. “IKinda like those cars.”= I (me) kind of (in a particular way) like those cars. “Kinda” is fairly common for kind of, although it’s not a “real” word. If you were to add the “I” at the beginning to make a single word, then the K should not be capitalized. Then again, if you’re using made-up words, I guess you should be able to apply made-up rules.
Cheers
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Re: IKinda

Post by jerzy » Sat Apr 12, 2008 9:48 am

Thank you very much for both answers. They were very helpful. Jerzy
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Re: IKinda

Post by Wizard of Oz » Sun Apr 13, 2008 11:08 am

.. jerzy .. unfortunately it was the blending of the I onto the front of kinda that confused you .. if you care to look, most current English dictionaries will include the word kinda .. it is listed as being colloquial or non standard or as the Macquarie 4 lists it in representations of speech meaning that it is one of those words that attempts to "spell" how we "speak" .. this kind of (kinda) spelling often appears in novels where the author is endevouring to capture the colour of a character's speech .. it attempts to make apparent the blendings and deletions of vowel and consonant sounds that occur in spoken English that are not there when the words are written .. other examples would include hafta = have to, sorta = sort of, wanna = want to, gunna/gonna = going to .. all of these appear in dictionaries with the rider that its attached to kinda .. the study of historical linguistics tells us that over time some of these spellings can become standardised and eventually become an accepted part of our written corpus ..

WoZ in Aus 13/04/08
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Re: IKinda

Post by jerzy » Sun Apr 13, 2008 11:37 am

Hello,
I am not Dorothy nor Alice but anyway thank you very much for your gift - the clear and instructive explanation. jerzy
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Re: IKinda

Post by PhilHunt » Mon Apr 14, 2008 12:02 pm

Wizard of Oz wrote:.. other examples would include hafta = have to, sorta = sort of, wanna = want to, gunna/gonna = going to ..
WoZ in Aus 13/04/08
Maybe one of our American submitters can confirm this, but, I read that contracted forms such as wanna and gonna are correct American English. According to Melvyn Bragg's book the Adventure of English it was a form of Middle England dialect brought over by the pilgrim fathers which eventually became part of formal American English.
Please correct me if I'm wrong.
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Re: IKinda

Post by gdwdwrkr » Mon Apr 14, 2008 1:20 pm

Consider yourself corrected. Two examples of the grunting which passes for communication, 'wanna' and 'gonna' are not "correct" even here in the vulgar and low USA.
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Re: IKinda

Post by Shelley » Mon Apr 14, 2008 1:58 pm

Also to be noted is "ILike", as in "Like, ILike -- really kinda like that guy, like -- uh, yeah!"
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Re: IKinda

Post by gdwdwrkr » Mon Apr 14, 2008 5:28 pm

seeutunsayin?
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Re: IKinda

Post by PhilHunt » Mon Apr 14, 2008 10:45 pm

gdwdwrkr wrote:Two examples of the grunting which passes for communication, 'wanna' and 'gonna' are not "correct" even here in the vulgar and low USA.
I never said they were vulgar, and, infact after reconsulting my book I found the reference I was thinking of. Gonna is an old English form which went out of fashion in Britain but was considered correct English in the 1820s by Benjamin Franklin.
The book says that the English spoken by the Americans of the 1820s was very pure. These terms should be seen in the Websters dictionary of 1828.

I also found out that 'fall' meaning autumn, which seems as American as apple pie, is in fact Old English.
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Re: IKinda

Post by gdwdwrkr » Tue Apr 15, 2008 12:22 am

The Old English probably ate apple pie, too.
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Re: IKinda

Post by Tony Farg » Tue Apr 15, 2008 7:54 am

Old English is a brand of cider here, so perhaps they did other things with them too.
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Re: IKinda

Post by gdwdwrkr » Tue Apr 15, 2008 9:19 am

Here Old English is a scratch-covering furniture "polish".
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Re: IKinda

Post by Bobinwales » Tue Apr 15, 2008 9:20 am

PhilHunt wrote:I never said they were vulgar, and, infact after reconsulting my book
Is that a typo, or (as Jim describes it) a grunt?
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