@

Discuss word origins and meanings.

@

Post by Bobinwales » Fri Jul 27, 2007 3:02 pm

If & is an ampersand, what is @?

It must have a name surely. I admit that it is only going to be of use to sad sods like me who don't need to open a dictionary to know what an aglet is, but even so...
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: All those years gone to waist!
Bob in Wales

@

Post by gdwdwrkr » Fri Jul 27, 2007 3:32 pm

For Pete's sake, it's "an A with a little circle around it". This is how old people say it while exchanging email addresses.
We savvy youngsters say "AT.", which included brief pause expresses the full stop/period in a vehement, knowing way, and which is never silently heard as a "dot".
Of course, the aglet is an external link.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

@

Post by Shelley » Fri Jul 27, 2007 3:55 pm

Oh. My. Gosh. THAT'S what you call that piece of plastic at the end of a shoelace?! All my life, and I never knew . . .

I was always under the impression (coming from some job I had involving bookkeeping and costing out stuff) that the @ symbol meant "at the cost of". The A stood for "at" and the circle around it signified the C in "cost". So, you'd have, say:

12 widgits @ 1.80 = $21.60

Now, because of the internet, I see that it simply means "at", which still works with the formula above. Although it annoyed me in the beginning when I was sticking to the "at the cost of" meaning. I thought the grand designers of the net were playing fast and loose with our sacred symbols!
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

@

Post by JANE DOErell » Fri Jul 27, 2007 4:19 pm

A site calling itself 'Using special characters from Windows Glyph List 4 (WGL4) in HTML' (http://www.alanwood.net/demos/wgl4.html) calls @ "commercial at"

Dictionary.com says "@". ASCII code 64. Common names: at sign, at, strudel. Rare: each, vortex, whorl, INTERCAL: whirlpool, cyclone, snail, ape, cat, rose, cabbage, amphora. ITU-T: commercial at.

Why did they mention 64 and not 40?
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

@

Post by gdwdwrkr » Fri Jul 27, 2007 4:25 pm

Now go look at your pickle jar. See if it has the U-in-an-O symbol. write to your pickle company and ask them what that is, and tell them how much you like their pickles. You will not only be informed, you will most likely receive free-pickle coupons.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

@

Post by zmjezhd » Fri Jul 27, 2007 4:55 pm

According to Professor Federigo Melis (1972) in Documenti per la storia economica dei secoli XIII-XVI, the first use of the @ in a commercial document was in 1536. Here's a scan of the page, an enlargement, and a transcription in modern letters. The meaning of the @ was anfora (or bottle).
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

@

Post by Meirav Micklem » Fri Jul 27, 2007 7:20 pm

In Israel we call it a strudel, or sometimes a snail. I do like Jane's "cabbage" though - let's see if we can get it to catch on.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

@

Post by Erik_Kowal » Fri Jul 27, 2007 7:29 pm

The Danes have a term for it that I rather like, "snabel-a" or "[elephant-]trunk A".
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: -- Looking up a word? Try OneLook's metadictionary (--> definitions) and reverse dictionary (--> terms based on your definitions)8-- Contribute favourite diary entries, quotations and more here8 -- Find new postings easily with Active Topics8-- Want to research a word? Get essential tips from experienced researcher Ken Greenwald

@

Post by Meirav Micklem » Fri Jul 27, 2007 7:34 pm

That sure is one very small elephant!
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

@

Post by Erik_Kowal » Fri Jul 27, 2007 7:38 pm

Denmark is a very small country. No room for big elephants.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: -- Looking up a word? Try OneLook's metadictionary (--> definitions) and reverse dictionary (--> terms based on your definitions)8-- Contribute favourite diary entries, quotations and more here8 -- Find new postings easily with Active Topics8-- Want to research a word? Get essential tips from experienced researcher Ken Greenwald

@

Post by Bobinwales » Sat Jul 28, 2007 11:18 am

If it was "anfora" in 1536, I reckon it should be an anfora in 2007, well done Zmjezhd.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: All those years gone to waist!
Bob in Wales

@

Post by etymosgirl » Sat Jul 28, 2007 4:23 pm

Everyone here knows that@ in internet language means"at the rate of".
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

@

Post by gdwdwrkr » Sat Jul 28, 2007 6:29 pm

So our email eddresses are "so-and-so at the rate of such-and-such-an ISP dot whatever"?
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

@

Post by Meirav Micklem » Sat Jul 28, 2007 7:18 pm

How do you get two elephants into a Mini?
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

@

Post by Shelley » Sat Jul 28, 2007 8:36 pm

I don't know, Meirav -- how DO you get two elephants into a Mini?
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

Post Reply