"I bags that"

Discuss word origins and meanings.

"I bags that"

Post by LoisMartin » Tue Sep 11, 2007 2:27 am

Yankee probably has a negative connotation only in the US South, where there are still vestiges of the American Civil War. We Southernern Rebels fought the Yankees. Only today, one of my coworkers reminded me of the joke "What's the difference between a Yankee and a damn Yankee?" "A damn Yankee stays while a Yankee goes back home" (that is, to the Northeastern US, where he belongs).
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"I bags that"

Post by Erik_Kowal » Tue Sep 11, 2007 2:37 am

He stays because he wants to yank your chains. ;-)
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"I bags that"

Post by Bobinwales » Tue Sep 11, 2007 9:37 am

LoisMartin wrote: "What's the difference between a Yankee and a damn Yankee?"
I have explained elsewhere that we in south Wales call North Walians “Gogs”, and, traditionally, we don’t get on, it’s supposed to be a tribal thing. It used to be said that Gogs were like haemorrhoids, when they came down and went back up they were not too bad, but if they come down and stay down they are a bloody pain.
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"I bags that"

Post by Tony Farg » Sun Sep 16, 2007 2:51 pm

Shelley: Since he didn't, I thought I'd help out:
That's just a load of double Dutch Tony. It would have been "Naayboors" instead.
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"I bags that"

Post by janiac » Mon Sep 17, 2007 5:39 pm

I remember Kipling using "bags I" in Stalky and Co, his wonderful novel about the Devon boarding school he went to. It's at least 19th century slang.
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"I bags that"

Post by MamaPapa » Mon Sep 17, 2007 9:08 pm

LoisMartin wrote: Yankee probably has a negative connotation only in the US South, where there are still vestiges of the American Civil War. We Southernern Rebels fought the Yankees. Only today, one of my coworkers reminded me of the joke "What's the difference between a Yankee and a damn Yankee?" "A damn Yankee stays while a Yankee goes back home" (that is, to the Northeastern US, where he belongs).
I would never call someone a "yankee" unless they played on the NY baseball team---and then I'd probably refer to them as a NY Yankee-player. I'm in the US South and it IS still considered slang. I might be offended if someone called me a yankee. I mostly hear the term used in a disparaging way as a descriptive, like, "he went off to college and came home talking all yankee". Also, a large Latino population here---refers to most USAers as yanks (only to distinguish, not to offend).

By the way, Lois, being from the South and all, I feel I must correct you in your terming of the Great War. We all know it is recorded in our [Southern] history books as the "War of Northern Aggression" ;-)
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"I bags that"

Post by LoisMartin » Tue Sep 18, 2007 12:43 am

MamaPapa, thanks for your correction. Of course you are right. And we do try not to talk (or think) about Yankees any more than we have to down here.
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Re: I bags that

Post by Bunny » Sun Jul 26, 2015 7:34 am

"I bags" the front seat, last piece etc etc was a common saying during my childhood (1960's) in Australia. I sometimes still say it as an adult (see, I haven't grown up yet LOL)
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Re:

Post by Bobinwales » Sun Jul 26, 2015 9:04 pm

There is no excuse for growing up Bunny. And welcome. It's nice here.
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End of topic.
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