"I bags that"

Discuss word origins and meanings.

"I bags that"

Post by trolley » Thu Jun 21, 2007 11:00 pm

Let me say, at the start, “I don’t have some strange fixation with bags”. It is more of a free association thing. Anyhoo, when we were kids, my brother and sisters and I would claim right to objects or privileges by “bags”ing them. It was a very powerful tool for a child. “Bags, I get the last cookie” or “ I bags the front seat” In our family it was an undeniable, irrefutable claim of right or ownership, the validity of which was even upheld by the highest court (Mom and Dad) “I’m sorry, he “bags”ed it. Case dismissed” The only way to contest it was to have made an earlier “bags”, which had to be verified by a reliable witness. I’ve never met anyone else who has ever heard of this. “Bags” doesn’t carry any weight when no one else knows what you mean. My parents don’t remember how it started but we did live in Glasgow for a couple of years. Maybe it is a Scottish or Glaswegian thing. I tried the WW search and Googled around to no avail. If it really is a saying, I wonder about the origin. I put it in the bag, therefore it is mine?
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"I bags that"

Post by trolley » Thu Jun 21, 2007 11:42 pm

O.K. Never mind. I go back to Google, add the quotation marks (doh!)and Viola. The answers are there, except the explanation of where we picked up Aussie slang
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"I bags that"

Post by gdwdwrkr » Fri Jun 22, 2007 1:11 am

The word around here was "dibs".
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"I bags that"

Post by Spear » Fri Jun 22, 2007 6:05 am

We "debs"-ed something
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"I bags that"

Post by Tony Farg » Fri Jun 22, 2007 7:09 am

In and around Manchester we used bags just the same.
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"I bags that"

Post by Bobinwales » Fri Jun 22, 2007 8:12 am

We bagged it in Wales as well.

Aussie slang? WoZ? Where's your book?
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Signature: All those years gone to waist!
Bob in Wales

"I bags that"

Post by Liam - Galway » Sat Jun 23, 2007 12:28 am

Bags was very common in Ireland too, tho' i don't think I've heard it is used for some time.
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"I bags that"

Post by Shelley » Sat Jun 23, 2007 12:31 am

Here, if you said, "Let's bag this", you'd be saying it's time to put an end to it (whatever "it" is) and go home.
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"I bags that"

Post by Meirav Micklem » Sat Jun 23, 2007 12:43 am

Have heard this used in the south of England too, but pronounced more like "bagsie", as in "I bagsie that chair".
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"I bags that"

Post by Erik_Kowal » Sat Jun 23, 2007 1:11 am

Ditto Meirav.
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"I bags that"

Post by Wizard of Oz » Sat Jun 23, 2007 8:46 am

.. sorry Bob and Liam and Tony we Aussies bagsed it long before you !!! .. nah nah nee nah nah !!! .. hmmmmm now given that just a few of those intrepid souls to be exported from the motherland just happened to be Poms and Taffies and Paddies there just might be a small chance that it did start somewhere in the Atlantic .. BUT .. trolley it is still used here mostly as children's slang ..

WoZ of Aus 23/06/07
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"I bags that"

Post by Gandalfbeb » Sun Jun 24, 2007 8:10 pm

We baggsed it in London too in my first childhood.
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"I bags that"

Post by Edwin Ashworth » Sun Jun 24, 2007 10:35 pm

We hates all these baggingses.
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"I bags that"

Post by wordybirdy » Tue Sep 04, 2007 8:37 pm

We bagsied it in Hertfordshire, too. :)
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"I bags that"

Post by paulwiggins » Wed Sep 05, 2007 7:44 am

Note wiktionary is wrong on this the term is also used in New Zealand, from memory it was more common among people of irish ancestry. Dictionary.com suggests it is of British origin. I'd punt for an etymology relationg to putting marbles in a bag. Two other things of note One used to say in kiwiland ''I bags first dibs _ not an Americanism the macqurie assists here .... play for dibs. to play with the object of keeping what has been won. [from dibstones, formerly a children's game played with small stones; variant of dab1]1

Also of note the grammar ... I seem to recall us saying ''we bags'' and ''he bagsed it first''.
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