the meaning of the word Jeger [Jäger, Jaeger -- Forum Admin.

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the meaning of the word Jeger [Jäger, Jaeger -- Forum Admin.

Post by rob arnold » Tue Jun 12, 2007 9:00 pm

I have come across the use of the word Jeger in a Scottish, particularly Highland context. I am aware that the Germanic meaning is "Hunter", and that this word itself is related to cooking.
It appears to be used as a title for someone acting on behalf of his master, similar perhaps to a "Tacksman", etc., I am trying to gain insight into what this role or office entailed.

Has anyone any ideas

Regards

R Arnold
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the meaning of the word Jeger [Jäger, Jaeger -- Forum Admin.

Post by Erik_Kowal » Wed Jun 13, 2007 8:06 am

Please describe the context more fully, including whether you have seen the word on paper, or only heard it spoken.
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the meaning of the word Jeger [Jäger, Jaeger -- Forum Admin.

Post by Phil White » Wed Jun 13, 2007 4:09 pm

The Germanic "jagen" (to hunt) has never had anything to do with cooking. Neither Grimm nor Kluge manage to take it back any further than OHG, where it always meant to hunt. Grimm posits a relationship to ON jaga in the meaning to "swing" or "move to and fro" and in the metaphorical meaning "to squabble".

Otherwise, "jaeger" (variously spelled jäger, jaeger, jager and yager is a loan word in the English language with several meanings, all of which correspond to the original German meanings.

Merriam Webster has:

1 a : HUNTER, HUNTSMAN b : one attending a person of rank or wealth and wearing hunter's costume
2 : any of several large dark-colored birds (genus Stercorarius) of northern seas that are related to the skua, are strong fliers, and tend to harass weaker birds until they drop or disgorge their prey
I'd be wary of a direct application of meaning 1b anywhere outside German-speaking nations.

I am unfamiliar with any further meaning, but there may be something in Scotland if you can give us some more detail on where you came across it.
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Post by russcable » Wed Jun 13, 2007 4:20 pm

If you like to drink your lunch, you can "cook" with Jägermeister. (^_^)
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Post by gdwdwrkr » Wed Jun 13, 2007 4:20 pm

Phil, your cupboards must be better-organized than most!
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Post by Phil White » Wed Jun 13, 2007 4:30 pm


Originally posted by russcableIf you like to drink your lunch, you can "cook" with Jägermeister. (^_^)
Thus called because it "chases" the contents of ones stomach though one or other of the potential exits. I've seen it described as a "licorice-flavoured liquor". Sounds to me like someone's never tasted licorice.
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Post by p. g. cox » Wed Jun 13, 2007 7:47 pm

I had just listened to Elgar's "Enigma" Variations when I read this topic. His variation #9 (Nimrod) pays tribute to A. J. Yaeger of Novello & Co. Jaeger is German for hunter, hence the allusion to Nimrod. He was a monarch in Mesopotamia, the great grandson of Noah and a mighty hunter who is also reputed to have built the Tower of Babel(Babylon) Go to: http://www.answers.com/topic/nimrod
for more if the mood takes you. It gets more interesting as language is involved.
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Post by Shelley » Wed Jun 13, 2007 7:49 pm

Phil White wrote: Grimm posits a relationship to ON jaga in the meaning to "swing" or "move to and fro" and in the metaphorical meaning "to squabble".
Do you think it might be the source for "jagged"?
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Post by Phil White » Wed Jun 13, 2007 9:19 pm


jagged
1440, from obs. verb jaggen (1373) "to notch or nick," Scot. and northern English, of unknown origin. Originally of garments with regular "toothed" edges; meaning "with the edge irregularly cut" is from 1577.
Online Etymology Dictionary
"Scottish and Northern English" may suggest a link to ON, but my resources don't stretch that far. Not at all sure about the verb "jaggen" being obsolete, though. I still know the verb "jag" meaning to "snag" or "catch". Could be a bit of dialect I picked up somewhere, though. The dictionaries give the meaning "stab" or "prick" and give "jaggen" as the source.
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Post by Ken Greenwald » Thu Jun 14, 2007 10:36 am

<“It appears to be used as a title for someone acting on behalf of his master, similar perhaps to a "Tacksman", etc., I am trying to gain insight into what this role or office entailed.”>
Rob, Looks to me as if Phil’s 1b) is what you are looking for. Here’s what the Oxford English Dictionary had to say. Check their quotes:

JÄGER, JAEGER: An attendant upon a person of rank or wealth, dressed in a huntsman's costume. [Cf. CHASSEUR: An attendant upon a person of rank or wealth, dressed in a military style.]
<1831 “Supervised by his JAGER, who stood behind his chair.”—‘The Young Duke’ by Disraeli, II. viii>

<1835 “The old IAGER or garde-chasse who accompanied her.”—‘Court Magazine,’ VI. page 193>

<1884 “He saw poor Macdonald the JÄGER here . . . and, being in want of a JÄGER, inquired after him and engaged him.”—‘More Leaves from the Journal of our Life in the Highlands’ by Queen Victoria, page 279>

<1896 “A handsome dark young fellow . . . clad in picturesque JÄGER costume.”—‘Marlborough House’ by A. H. Beaven, vii. page 114> [[used attributively]]
Ken G – June 14, 2007
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Post by Shelley » Thu Jun 14, 2007 11:13 am

As Mick Jagger sang -- "Please allow me to introduce myself: I wait upon a man of weath and taste."
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Post by Phil White » Thu Jun 14, 2007 12:08 pm

In the 1841 census, the members of the royal household included two 'jaegers':

This census return also illustrates the influence of German connections on the royal household: Prince Albert, previously Victoria’s first cousin from the royal German house of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, has two ‘Jaegers’ on hand (jaeger from the German jäger, meaning huntsman). Albert was a famously enthusiastic hunter, and the jaegers presumably accompanied him on his frequent shooting trips.
http://www.londoncensus.co.uk/queenvic.htm
A very slight insight may be gained from this description of this print of Archibald Fraser MacDonald, HRH The Prince of Wales’s (Prince Albert's) Jäger.
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Post by mongrowl » Fri Jun 15, 2007 10:48 pm

Perhaps this touches on Mr Brown?
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