Jack Robinson's barn [or Robin Hood's barn -- Forum Mod.]

Discuss word origins and meanings.

Jack Robinson's barn [or Robin Hood's barn -- Forum Mod.]

Post by Leif Thorvaldson » Sat May 26, 2007 8:54 pm

I can find reference to Jack Robinson as indicating swiftness of deed or thought, but can't find anything about the proverbial trip around Jack Robinson's barn. Around the barn seems to imply a slower process, perhaps a delay as well as a useless effort. How did the two meanings get mixed?

Leif
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: In America, anybody can be president. That's one of the risksyou take. -- Adlai Stevenson

Jack Robinson's barn [or Robin Hood's barn -- Forum Mod.]

Post by Tony Farg » Sun May 27, 2007 3:09 pm

What exactly is the meaning of the trip around it? I've heard of the swiftness bit but never the trip round the barn, so for me the meanings have never had a chance of getting mixed.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

Jack Robinson's barn [or Robin Hood's barn -- Forum Mod.]

Post by dalehileman » Sun May 27, 2007 3:26 pm

Evidently the expr can imply a roundabout way of doing something

http://cathyknits.typepad.com/my_weblog ... index.html
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

Jack Robinson's barn [or Robin Hood's barn -- Forum Mod.]

Post by Leif Thorvaldson » Sun May 27, 2007 9:43 pm

An example of usage is: "He sent me 'round Robinson's barn to get to the railway station and we barely made the 9:15 to Hartford Hereford and Hampshire. It was just as well as our plane was delayed by rain in Spain.
Sometimes it is "Jack Robinson's barn that one is sent around. I haven't been able to find a reference as to etymology for the phrase.

Tony: You will never be the same again now that you have been exposed to the two of them!!*G*
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: In America, anybody can be president. That's one of the risksyou take. -- Adlai Stevenson

Jack Robinson's barn [or Robin Hood's barn -- Forum Mod.]

Post by Ken Greenwald » Mon May 28, 2007 1:44 am

Leif, Long time no hear – glad you’ve found your way back.

I’ve never heard the expression AROUND ROBINSON’S BARN, but in my archives search I was able to find many examples of its use. However, when I consulted my usual sources, and some unusual ones also, I could not even find it listed, much less its etymology.

AROUND JACK ROBINSON’S BARN or AROUND ROBINSON’S BARN appears to mean, as you’ve implied and from the quotes below, a longer way, a more roundabout or difficult way of accomplishing something. The expression apparently originated in the U.S. (see quotes) and the earliest example I could find was from 1891, which, it should be noted, doesn't contain the given name ‘Jack.’ It’s my guess that the ‘Jack Robinson’ of Before you can say Jack Robinson (1778) or As quick as you can say Jack Robinson fame, meaning ‘very quickly,’ probably had nothing to do the origin of the BARN expression because, as you said, one seems to be just about the opposite of the other (slow versus quick). However, it is possible that some years later the ‘Jack’ was tacked on by some who, by reverse association, connected Robinson with the ‘Jack’ of the earlier expression. Incidentally, when I was growing up the phrase ‘as quick as’ or ‘before you can say Jack Robinson’ was common. But I haven’t heard it in many, many years and I don’t think there is a chance in hell that my 24 year-old son would recognize it – things come, things go!

Well I’ve certainly hit a brick wall on this one, and, as I am wont to do in such dead-end (at least for me) situations, I’ve e-mailed Joan Houston Hall, editor of the Dictionary of American Regional English (it was not listed there either) to see if she might be able to shed some light on the subject. And, unless she is on vacation – she is usually a very speedy answerer – I should have a response in a few days.

Meanwhile, here are some quotes I came up with, which, if nothing else, do seem to indicate that this is a U.S. expression:
<1891 “We [[the senator-elect of Kansas]] believe in the Government, which is simply the agent of the people, issuing their money directly to them without going AROUND ROBINSON’S BARN to find them.—‘Chicago Daily Tribune,’ 30 January, page 4>

<1909 “ROBINSON’S BARN. . . A circumlocution. ‘Don’t go WAY ROUND ROBINSON’S BARN trying to tell it.’”— ‘Dialect Notes,’ Vol. 3, page 415> [[U.S. publication]]

<1922 “The closest mouthed person, who seldom is given to talking about himself, will yet manoeuver in devious ways, will travel all AROUND JACK ROBINSON’S BARN, and will pull strings of all sorts, to get his name in the paper, or to inspire the editor to say of him what he would rather bite his tongue off than say himself.”—‘Psycho-Analysis and the Ministry’ by Rev. John More, New Haven, Connecticut, in ‘The Homiletic Review,’ Vol. LXXXIII, No.1, January, page 18> [[U.S. publisher Funk & Wagnall’s]]

<1930 “We went AROUND ROBINSON’S BARN to get you out of there and over here? They either
tailed you, as we did, or they tailed me. Didn't you recognize him?”—‘Analog Science Fiction / Science Fact,’ page 24> [[U.S.publisher]]

<1932 “He [[head of the State Department of Public works]] criticized the State’s method of check and double-check in the construction of any building, saying it was ‘RUNNING AROUND ROBINSON’S BARN to get something done.’”—‘New York Times,’ 26 October, page 33>

<1933 “ . . the Englishman [[writer]], quite properly, I think, may reply that after the American has fussed and frittered all the way AROUND ROBINSON’S BARN he usually, if he is a good writer, comes very close to the place from which the Englishman never left.”—‘Washington Post,’ 17 December, page SM11>

<1944 “Upset and going ALL AROUND ROBINSONS BARN before finally getting to anger because of last week’s cancellation.”—"Rorschach's Test" by Samuel Jacob Beck, page 143> [[U.S. publisher]]

<1951 “Will you please elucidate? But do not GO ALL THE WAY AROUND ROBINSON’S BARN, as I have noticed you are sometimes inclined to do.”—‘Courier-Journal’ (Louisville, Kentucky), 4 January, Section 2>

<1952 (advertisement) “Stop Meandering Deliveries . . . Money Down the Drain. Route your trucks the shortest way every trip. The time and gas used by your drivers looking for unknown streets, driving ALL AROUND ROBINSON’S BARN to make deliveries, will buy you a hundred maps like Hearne’s Street Map of your city and county area,”—‘Washington Post,’ 18 November, page 2>

<1975 “What was the use of ‘beating around the bush’ or of ‘going AROUND JACK ROBINSON’S BARN?’”—‘Anchor Post’ by Faith Johnston, page 197> [[U.S. book]]

<1984 “. . . from basic principles. He didn’t believe in ‘going a long way AROUND ROBINSON’S BARN’! Unfortunately, however, for students . . .”—‘American Journal of Medical Genetics,’ Vol. 18, Issue 4 , Pages 621 - 641, Special Issue: The Meckel Symposium>

<1989 “‘ ... keeping, permitting and maintaining a nuisance on said above described premises’
and so on and so on three different ways AROUND JACK ROBINSON’S BARN . . .”—‘Annie Chambers’ by Lenore Carroll, page [[“The eponymous Annie's life is the story of prostitution in Chicago and Kansas City from 1859 to 1933.”]]

<1997 “. . . but it [[the film]] wandered ALL AROUND ROBINSON’S BARN and even devoted footage to inept allusions to medieval scholarship.”—‘Films in Review’ by National Board of Review of Motion Pictures (U.S.), page 251>

<2006 “Hook up the DVD - and couldn't get it to work - to make a long story short, we had to go AROUND JACK ROBINSON’S BARN to find the solution - I don't know why this equipment can't be more user friendly.”— cathyknits.typepad.com., 23 September> [[U.S. blog]]
Ken – May 27, 2007
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

Jack Robinson's barn [or Robin Hood's barn -- Forum Mod.]

Post by Ken Greenwald » Wed May 30, 2007 2:22 am

Leif et al, I received an e-mail back from Joan Houston Hall, the editor of the Dictionary of American Regional English (DARE) project at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. She said she was on the road in California and so didn’t have access to her office resources but recommended I look in DARE under ROBIN HOOD’S BARN, which she thinks is the more common variant.
_________________

Aha, I see said the blind man! This would make a lot more – though not perfect – sense. Since Robin Hood was an outlaw living in the forest, and any barn of his (assuming he had one, which might not seem completely logical – but who says that such sayings have to be – nevertheless, see Funk’s very reasonable explanation below) would certainly be located at a remote and out-of-the-way place. Thus, it is not hard to imagine how going around his barn might have come to imply a difficult or unnecessarily roundabout way of doing things. And it also does not seem unlikely that through mishearings, missayings, and possibly confusion with the ‘Robinson’ of the older and more familiar BEFORE YOU CAN SAY JACK ROBINSON (1778) – that ROBIN HOOD’S BARN (1797) could have eventually [[see 1891 quote above ]] morphed into the similar-sounding, but far lesser-used variant, ROBINSON’S BARN.
_________________

Dictionary of American Regional English, Vol. 4, page 608

GO (ALL THE WAY) AROUND ROBIN HOOD’S BARN: verb phrase [[1797]. Also GO ROUND ROBIN HOOD’S BARN, GO (ALL THE WAY) ROUND ROBINSON’S BARN; for additional variations see quotes [[below]] [English dialect; cf English Dialect Dictionary [
] TO GO ROUND BY ROBIN HOOD’S BARN (at ROBIN HOOD)] [[found in U.S.]] scattered, but chiefly in Northern, North Midland, Central Atlantic [[states], West Virginia: To engage in an unnecessarily roundabout course of action; also figuratively; [[tell a long-winded, repetitious account; take a rambling roundabout course]]
<1797 “I can sell them abundantly fast without the trouble of GOING ROUND ROBIN HOOD’S BARN.” (Maryland)—in ‘Mason Locke Weems’ (1929) by Weems, Vol.2, page 77>’’

<1836 “If requests be of any avail as a check, why GO AROUND ROBIN HOOD’S BARN?”—‘Southern Literary Messenger,’ Vol. 2, page 625>

<1909 “ROBINSON’S BARN. . . A circumlocution. ‘Don’t GO WAY ROUND ROBINSON’S BARN trying to tell it.’”— ‘Dialect Notes,’ Vol. 3, page 415>

<1924 “ROBIN HOOD’S BARN. Same as ROBINSON’S BARN.”—‘Dialect Notes,’ Vol. 5, page 281>

<1928 “When it came to talking, why say, he wandered ALL ROUND ROBIN HOOD’S BARN!”—‘The Man Who Knew Coolidge ‘ by Sinclair Lewis, page 17>

<1951 “I have gone ALL THE WAY AROUND ROBIN HOOD’S BARN to arrive at the old platitudes,”—‘The Caine Mutiny’ by Herman Wouk, page 464>

<1951 “Will you please elucidate? But do not GO ALL THE WAY AROUND ROBINSON’S BARN, as I have noticed you are sometimes inclined to do.”—‘Courier-Journal’ (Louisville, Kentucky), 4 January, Section 2>

<1960 “ALL AROUND ROBINSON’S BARN. All AROUND ROBIN HOOD’S BARN. (To tell a long-winded repetitious account.)”—‘Vermont History,’ Vol 28. page 114>

<1988 “Finding the church turned out to be a chase AROUND ROBIN HOOD’S BARN. Mattie’s directions were to the old church. The congregation had since moved its home of worship.”—‘Bean Trees’ (Kentucky) by Kingsolver, page 217>
Note: DARE also includes the results of their 1965-70 survey/questionnaire which involved hundred’s of responses from the states mentioned. Here are some more examples of the usages of the above phrases from these surveys: <“To do something in an indirect and complicated way: ‘I don’t know why he had to go _________ to do that.' (All the way; way; ) (a)round Robin Hood’s barn; all the way round Robin Hood’s bush; all the way round Robin; around Robin Hood’s barn and in the back door; beat (or clear) around Robin Hood’s barn; this way around Robin Hood’s barn; all around Robin’s hill> <“When someone avoids giving you a definite answer: ‘We tried to pin him down, but he just kept _________ ’) Going (or taking) me around Robin Hood’s barn; beating around Robin Hood’s barn; Going ‘all around Robin Hood’s barn’ and winding up without what we were seeking.
_________________

Here is Charles Funk’s (of Funk & Wagnall’s) discussion:

2107 Curious Word Origins Sayings & Expressions (1993) from his earlier Hog on Ice (1948):

ALL AROUND ROBIN HOOD’S BARN: Robin Hood (or 'Robert of the wood,' as some have explained the name) may have been altogether a legendary figure or may have actually existed. No one knows. The earliest literary reference to him is in Langland's Piers Plowman, written about 1377. He may have lived, according to some light evidence, toward the latter part of the twelfth century. But Robin Hood's house was Sherwood Forest; its roof the leaves and branches. His dinner was the king's deer; his wealth the purses of hapless travelers. What need had he of a barn, and how was it laid out if to go around it means, as the use of the phrase implies, a rambling roundabout course? The explanation is simple. He had no barn. His granary, when he had need of one, was the cornfields of the neighborhood. To go around his barn was to make a circuitous route around the neighborhood fields.
_________________

The following are some additional quotes from the OED and my archive searches of various journals and newspapers. And I would note these quotes were numerous in comparison with the sparse few I found for the ‘Robinson’ version of the phrase. But with less than 1000 Google hits Robin Hood's Barn ain't no barnburner either:
<circa 1854 “The way some folks have of GOING ROUND ‘ROBIN HOOD'S BARN’ to come at a thing.”—‘The Humors of Falconbridge’ (1856), page 220>

<1859 “If the Herald wants to explain this matter and its own agency in it, why don’t it do so directly, instead of lying all ‘AROUND ROBIN HOOD’S BARN.”—‘New York Times,’ 25 August, page 2>

<1874 “That they [[the Republicans]] traveled ALL THE WAY ‘ROUND ROBIN HOOD’S BARN’ for the purpose of getting a point on Republicans, is not incredible, but it is not probable.”—‘New York Times,’ 7 September, page 1>

<1878 “‘Where have you been today?’ ‘ALL ROUND ROBIN HOOD’S BARN! I have been all about the country, first here and then there.’”—‘Notes & Queries,’ 22 June, page 486/2>

<1910 “And that brings me to the central point of my short theme. Why GO AROUND ROBIN HOOD’S BARN, as the children say, when we have at hand a single rubric of pure psychology which can cover the whole field.”—‘The Philosophical Review,’ Vol. 19, No. 5, September, page 509>

<1915 “All this cross-hauling back and forth AROUND ROBIN HOOD’S BARN from producer to consumer costs money.”—‘The American Economic Review,’ Vol. 5, No. 1, Supplement, March, page 117>

<1926 “Why do you prefer going around Robin Hood's barn every trip instead of in the front door? ‘Time Magazine,’ 15 March>

<1946 “Brevity.—‘Should not GO ALL AROUND ROBIN HOOD’S BARN to put across a point’; there should be as little description as possible—let the conversations of the characters to the describing.’”—‘The English Journal,’ Vol. 35, No. 9, November, page 481>

<1964 “As to unreasonable routing practice no built-in protection for the shipper has been provided. Nor does a shipper have notice that it will be routed AROUND ROBIN HOOD’S BARN until after this has actually occurred.”—‘California Law Review,’ Vol. 52, No. 2, May, page 240>

<1977 “Your article on birth control goes AROUND ROBIN HOOD'S BARN for an answer to the birth control problem.”—‘Time,’ 31 January, apage 1/3>

<1984 “To insist that they should always formulate their inquiries by using the biological species concept is to make them take a risky trip AROUND ROBIN HOOD’S BARN.”—‘Philosophy of Science,’ Vol. 51, No. 2, June, page 317>

<1993 “. . . Fredericksburg’s courthouse, with its awkward location ‘cater-corner to the street.’ ‘Like ROBINS HOOD’S BARN, you have to go all around it to get into it.”—‘The William and Mary Quarterly,’ 3rd Series, Vol. 50, No. 1, January, page 45>

<2000 “We should not try to legislate the pleasures of others but may properly record our own, and after taking this turn AROUND ROBIN HOOD’S BARN, I have found my pleasure advanced by thinking of the historical counterparts . . . “—‘The Huntington Library Quarterly,’ Vol. 63, No. 1/2, page 138>

<2003 “During that time, some of the residents were made to travel other routes to get to their homes, which meant longer travel time and, as the saying goes, ‘GOING AROUND ROBIN HOOD’S BARN.’”—‘Frederick News Post’ (Maryland), 13 February, page 20>
Ken G - May 29, 2007
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

Jack Robinson's barn [or Robin Hood's barn -- Forum Mod.]

Post by trolley » Wed May 30, 2007 3:11 am

Ken
I noticed that one of the results from DARE’s survey was “to go round robin”. I wonder if there is a connection to a round-robin tournament, in which each team or player plays every other team or player once. This type of tournament set up does seem a bit of a trip ‘round the barn when compared to seeding the teams and playing a single knock-out. Round-robin can also refer to a petition or letter of complaint that was signed in a circular fashion to hide the identity of the original signor. I can always connect the dots, but I can’t always make out what the picture is.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

Jack Robinson's barn [or Robin Hood's barn -- Forum Mod.]

Post by Edwin Ashworth » Wed May 30, 2007 12:58 pm

There's a lovely short walk in the Peak District of Derbyshire from a B-Road up to a rocky plateau and a separate monolith known as "Robin Hood's Stride". He must have been a giant to be able to leap the gap between the two mini-pinnacles. Mind you, he must have lived an awfully long time too to have been able to visit all the sites named after him.
The coincidence with the above is that so many itinerant friars and beggars did the steepish climb up from the then track to what they thought was a chimneyed great house behind the line of trees - in the hope of a few scraps of food and a pallet for the night - that the rock acquired its alternative name "Mock Beggar's Hall" - right out of the way.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

Jack Robinson's barn [or Robin Hood's barn -- Forum Mod.]

Post by Erik_Kowal » Wed May 30, 2007 9:29 pm

My theory is that they were looking for Robin Hood's Bar.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: -- Looking up a word? Try OneLook's metadictionary (--> definitions) and reverse dictionary (--> terms based on your definitions)8-- Contribute favourite diary entries, quotations and more here8 -- Find new postings easily with Active Topics8-- Want to research a word? Get essential tips from experienced researcher Ken Greenwald

Jack Robinson's barn [or Robin Hood's barn -- Forum Mod.]

Post by Shelley » Wed May 30, 2007 10:31 pm

Maybe they were looking for Robin Hood's bairn.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

Jack Robinson's barn [or Robin Hood's barn -- Forum Mod.]

Post by Erik_Kowal » Thu May 31, 2007 3:55 am

Whichever it was, it would probably have culminated in Robin Hood's Barney.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: -- Looking up a word? Try OneLook's metadictionary (--> definitions) and reverse dictionary (--> terms based on your definitions)8-- Contribute favourite diary entries, quotations and more here8 -- Find new postings easily with Active Topics8-- Want to research a word? Get essential tips from experienced researcher Ken Greenwald

Jack Robinson's barn [or Robin Hood's barn -- Forum Mod.]

Post by Shelley » Thu May 31, 2007 11:41 am

Ooo -- and would you listen to him with his blarney!
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

Jack Robinson's barn [or Robin Hood's barn -- Forum Mod.]

Post by Ken Greenwald » Thu May 31, 2007 3:22 pm

<Ken
I noticed that one of the results from DARE’s survey was “to go round robin”. I wonder if there is a connection to a round-robin tournament, in which each team or player plays every other team or player once. This type of tournament set up does seem a bit of a trip ‘round the barn when compared to seeding the teams and playing a single knock-out. Round-robin can also refer to a petition or letter of complaint that was signed in a circular fashion to hide the identity of the original signor. I can always connect the dots, but I can’t always make out what the picture is.>
John, I think the two probably aren’t connected, although one can never be certain. This particular abbreviated DARE entry, TO GO ROUND ROBIN, meaning to do something in a ‘roundabout and complicated way,’ was recorded in North Carolina in surveys taken between 1965 and 1970. The first use of ROUND ROBIN in reference to tournaments (tennis) was in 1895 (see quote below). So whether the folks in North Carolina had in the backs of their minds this tournament of indirectness – ROUND ROBIN – when they shortened the expression from GO ROUND ROBIN HOOD’S BARN to GO ROUND ROBIN is hard to say.
___________________

But ROUND ROBIN itself has a very interesting history and even has some meanings that I wasn't aware of. So I'll share with you what I've found. For starters, here are the definitions provided by Merriam-Webster’s Unabridged Dictionary:

1a) A written petition, memorial, or protest to which the signatures are affixed in a circle so as not to indicate who signed first. b) A statement signed by several persons [[frequently in alphabetical order to indicate that responsibility is shared]].<“A round robin signed by 15 senators, who declared that . . . they would not vote to convict the governor”—Hodding Carter”>. c) A letter sent in turn to the members of a group (as a college class) each of whom signs and forwards it sometimes after adding information or comment. <“A round robin letter to religious leaders in the community requesting that they pass the bibliography on to the next person on a list.”—American Library Association Bulletin>

2) A talk or meeting in which several participants share: round table. <“Got together on a round robin telephone hookup”—‘Newsweek’>

3) A tournament in which every contestant meets every other contestant in turn. [[originally U.S. and frequently attributive; today used to describe any event, most often a sporting event of some kind, where everyone takes a turn]].

4) Series, sequence, round. <“A round robin of price boosts”—‘Newsweek’> <“round robin of colorcasts for all the regular shows on the network”—‘Advertising Age’>
_____________________

Our archived Ask the Wordwizard (by Jonathon Green, author of Cassell's Dictionary of Slang) has addressed the origin of round robin, but I’ll add some further detail, borrowing from Word Detective (http://www.word-detective.com/back-m.html#robin), Facts on Filed Encyclopedia of Word and Phrase Origins, Morris Dictionary of Word and Phrase Origins, and Urdang’s Picturesque Expresssions:

ROUND ROBIN: The robin in this expression has nothing to do with the bird of the same name. This robin is derived from the French ruban, or ‘ribbon,’ which prompts one to ask how a 'ribbon' became a 'robin.' The story is said to have begun during the 17th and 18th centuries in France. Petitioning the crown (and some say the captain of a ship in the French navy), even with a just grievance, was a dangerous course of action. A not uncommon response of a monarch (or the captain of a ship) to a distasteful petition from his subjects (or crew) was the beheading (or hanging) of the man (men) whose signatures were first on the list. Some clever petitioners, looking for a way to complain without losing their heads, came up with an ingenious idea for signing their names, which took one of two forms:

1) Petitioners signed their names on an actual ribbon, a ruban rond, round ribbon, which was joined into a circle and attached to the document bearing their grievances. In this way no signer could be accused of signing the document first and run the risk of having their head chopped off (or of being hung) for instigating trouble. Later, English sailors are said to have appropriated the French phrase but reversing the wording to ‘round ruban,’ and finally further corrupting it to the familiar ‘round robin.’

2) Petitioners signed their names at the foot of the document as if the signatures were spokes of a wheel radiating from its hub. Some say that this method originated in the British Navy, where in the days of Lord Nelson and earlier, a ship’s captain had the right to order the hanging of the first man signing a petition of grievance. The fact that his signature was at the top of the list was considered prima facie evidence that he was the instigator of mutiny (see 1730 quote below).
________________________

ROUND ROBIN – the document
<1730 “A ROUND ROBIN is a Name given by Seamen, to an Instrument on which they sign their Names round a Circle, to prevent the Ring~leader being discover'd by it, if found.”—‘Weekly Journal,’ 3 January, page 3/4>

<1731 “The Method used by Sailors when they mutiny, by signing their names in an orbicular manner, which they call a round Robin.”—‘Gentleman’s Magazine’ I. page 238>

<1742 “The sailors on board the fleet, signed, what is called by them, a ROUND ROBIN, that is, a paper containing . . . their names subscribed in a circle, that it might not be discerned who signed first.”—‘Lives of the Admirals’ (1750) by James Campbell, II. page 98>

<1755 “If I thought it could be of any use, I could easily present them with a ROUND ROBIN to that effect of above a thousand . . . names.”—in ‘World,’ Chesterfield, No. 146, 8>

<1791 “I enclose the ROUND ROBIN. This jeu d'esprit took its rise one day at dinner at our friend Sir Joshua Reynolds's.”—in ‘Boswell’ (Oxford edition) by Sir W. Forbes, II. page 60>

<1816 “Such a ROUND ROBIN of mere lies, that you knew not which to begin with.”—‘Lay Sermons’ (Bohn) by Samuel Coleridge, page 349> [[transferred sense]]

<1828 “If thirteen physicians . . . had written what seamen call a ROUND ROBIN to an authority.”—‘The Lancet,’ 21 June, page 382/2>

<1829 “Last week the whole of the tenants . . . sent a ROUND-ROBIN to his lordship's steward.”—“Farmer’s Journal,” October, page 330>

<1847, “I proposed that a ‘ROUND ROBIN’ should be prepared and sent ashore to the consul.”—‘Omoo’ by Herman Melville, xx>

<1870 “[He] so tormented his crew that they signed a ROUND ROBIN, and sent it to the Admiralty.”—‘A Tour Round England’ by Thornbury, I. page 192>

<circa 1859 “He tried to induce a large number of the supporters of the government to sign a ROUND ROBIN desiring a change.” — ‘Biographies Contributed to the Encyclopedia Britannica’ (1867) by Macaulay, page 217>

<1896 “The headmaster suggested our signing and sending a ROUND ROBIN of congratulation.”—‘Eton in the Forties’ by J. D. Coleridge, page 133>

<1929 “. . . he had circulated a ROUND ROBIN to which he had secured 20 signatures of Senators pledging themselves to oppose the unqualified passage of the treaty.—‘Time Magazine,’ 21 January>

<1978 “Writers of ROUND ROBINS (‘We, the undersigned, each in his or her personal capacity . . .’) also choose The Times for preference, the second elevens being accommodated elsewhere.”—B. Levin in ‘The First Cuckoo’ by K. Gregory, page 13>

<1990 “In the first years of exile, several key members of the Tillich circle maintained an extensive ROUND-ROBIN correspondence, aiming at eventual. . . publication of the articles . . .”—‘The American Journal of Sociology,’ Vol. 95, No. 6, May, page >

<2004 “The key counsel from the Senate was the ‘ROUND ROBIN’ signed by thirty-seven Republican senators on March 4, 1919.”—‘The American Journal of International Law,’ Vol. 98, No. 4, October, page 704>

ROUND ROBIN – the tournament (also used attributively and figuratively)
<1895 “The so~called ROUND-ROBIN tournament, where each man plays every other, furnishes the best possible test of tennis skill.” Ibid. “No one would . . . argue that a man of that rating could win in a round-robin.”—‘Official Lawn Tennis Bulletin,’ 3 January, pages 1/2 and 3/1>

<1904 “Invitation tournaments are of American origin, and the matches are generally played on what is called the ‘ROUND ROBIN’ system, each of the players meeting all of the others in turn.” Ibid. iv. 65 “The British visitors next played a ROUND-ROBIN at Chicago.”—‘Lawn Tennis’ by J. P. Paret, iii. page 24 and, iv. page 65>

<1943 “In a ROUND~ROBIN tournament among teams of four or two we must arrange a schedule by which every team meets every other just once.”—‘Mathematical Recreations’ by M. Kraitchik, ix. page 231>

<1952 “Arrange the players in groups, and have the winners, or the first two or three of each group, play a final ROUND ROBIN.”—‘Chess Secrets’ by E. Lasker, page 379>

<1974 “The ‘Aces’ of America [sc. a bridge team] held their own against the Italians in the preliminary ROUND-ROBIN to decide who should compete in the final.”—‘The Times,’ 20 April, page 11/1>

<2000 “Into this ROUND-ROBIN of self-congratulation, the Chief of the Air Battle Anaylysis Center . . .interjected that he was uneasy about relying on intuition . . .”—‘Social Studies of Science,’ Vol. 30, No. 2, April, page 202>

ROUND ROBIN – the sequence or series
<1966 “The idea, advanced by President Kennedy, was to put through a big ROUND ROBIN of tariff reductions.”—‘Time Magazine,’ 23 September>

<1977 “As if to point up the homosexual theme, rather than to offer a ROUND ROBIN of sexuality.”—‘New York Review of Books,’ 4 August, page 7/1>

<1989 “After an inconclusive ROUND ROBIN of talks in Cairo, Washington and New York, Mubarak went home warning -- not for the first time -- that a ‘golden opportunity’ was about to be missed.”—‘Time Magazine,’ 16 October>

<2001 “Instead, he chooses a ROUND ROBIN of interior monologues from Luc, his parents, his aunt and uncle, and his cousin Cléine.”—‘The French Review,’ Vol. 74, No. 4, March, page 846>

(quotes from Oxford English Dictionary and archived sources)
____________________

Ken G – May 31, 2007
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

Jack Robinson's barn [or Robin Hood's barn -- Forum Mod.]

Post by Erik_Kowal » Sat Jun 02, 2007 7:49 am

There's a pageful of photos of Robin Hood's Stride/Mock Beggar's Hall at http://www.megalithic.co.uk/article.php?sid=6263 . From certain angles the illusion of a large house is very persuasive.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: -- Looking up a word? Try OneLook's metadictionary (--> definitions) and reverse dictionary (--> terms based on your definitions)8-- Contribute favourite diary entries, quotations and more here8 -- Find new postings easily with Active Topics8-- Want to research a word? Get essential tips from experienced researcher Ken Greenwald

Jack Robinson's barn [or Robin Hood's barn -- Forum Mod.]

Post by Edwin Ashworth » Mon Jun 04, 2007 9:14 am

I'd lived there for three months before I realised why it rained in so much.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

Post Reply