railroad handcar

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railroad handcar

Post by incarnatus est » Fri Jan 26, 2007 10:14 pm

That's the question. The car that has pump handles and is propelled by pumping.
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railroad handcar

Post by trolley » Fri Jan 26, 2007 10:18 pm

I'm not being a smart ass. We always called them exactly what you described them as. Pumper cars.
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railroad handcar

Post by Edwin Ashworth » Fri Jan 26, 2007 10:38 pm

I've come across "track speeder", but you'll have to research the expression.
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railroad handcar

Post by Erik_Kowal » Fri Jan 26, 2007 11:57 pm

Trains.com describes track speeders thus: "Track speeders were a stage between yesterday's muscle-driven handcars and today's rail-ready pickup trucks that allow railroad employees to inspect equipment or to go on down the line."

The Wikipedia article on handcars suggests other approximate synonyms, including trolley, draisine, velorail and railbike. By definition, the latter two are foot-powered, whereas a draisine or trolley could in principle be powered by hand, foot or motor. The track speeders I have seen described have all been powered by some form of motor or engine.
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railroad handcar

Post by trolley » Sat Jan 27, 2007 5:36 am

Hand cars were later replaced with the railroad Velocipede ( what a splendid word! I'll be keeping that one in my pocket for later use). It looked like a bicycle that ran on one rail and had a third stabilizing wheel that ran on the opposing rail. Not the old three wheeled bike,again? Perhaps, a little off track ,but the story could be a good ice breaker at a party.
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railroad handcar

Post by Bobinwales » Sat Jan 27, 2007 2:19 pm

Trolley, I spent the years beteen being 17 and 40 in the docks industry. Someone found a vehicle you call a velocipede in an old shed, so I have actually ridden one. I was an interesting experience, especially as the one I rode was in need of some TLC, and a lot of grease.
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Signature: All those years gone to waist!
Bob in Wales

railroad handcar

Post by dimod » Sun Jan 28, 2007 10:51 am

In my home town we hold a bi-annual race in which hand-carts are raced along the dual railway line which bisects our town. The name used for these carts is "kalamazoo", but I am not sure why.
Photos and description at
http://www.visitcummins.com/kalamazoo/kalamazoo.htm
Di
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railroad handcar

Post by DJHampson » Tue Jan 30, 2007 2:57 pm

Be careful, though. Velocipede also refers generally to any primitive bicycle or tricycle. It is only a name applied to railway handcars as well as similar vehicles propelled by movement of the feet.
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Signature: markedly DJH

railroad handcar

Post by Shelley » Tue Jan 30, 2007 4:54 pm

dimod wrote: The name used for these carts is "kalamazoo", but I am not sure why.
Cool site, dimod. There's a town in Michigan, USA named Kalamazoo. It's the home of Kellogg's (a cereal brand named after a grain mogul and health nut who set up a spa there). There's a guy who says he has a gal there. Don't know where the name or the word comes from, though. After a brief search, I find theories only: according to one "authority", it comes from "negikanamazo", an Indian word meaning either otter-tail, beautiful water or boiling water depending on who you're asking. Another site says because of springs bubbling in the riverbed there, it means "place where the water boils". Apparently Naruda Michael Walden, a member of the Mahavishnu Orchestra (remember?) was from Kalamazoo and on a search you get a lot of sites having to do with meditative practises.
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