hoy

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hoy

Post by Wizard of Oz » Thu Nov 16, 2006 2:16 am

.. my dearly beloved suggested to me that it was time, To hoy all this junk out. .. and I knew perfectly well that she meant that we had to throw out all the junk .. she then added those fatal words, I wonder where hoy comes from? .. easy I thought it is a common word so off to Onelokk I went .. and went and went and went ...... hmmmm it is a flat bottomed boat or an interjection but nowhere did I find it as a verb meaning to throw .. so silly me decided to look locally and sure enough in the Macquarie 4 I found ..
hoy 3. verb t Archaic to throw
.. a further googled look found this ..
hoy 3. Term used as a verb in Newcastle dialect. Means to throw or throw out.
Source: Urban Dictionary.
.. aha so hot on the track I found that ChronicleLive, a Newcastle newspaper had run a contest to find the meaning of some Geordie words and sure enough there was ..
Hoy-oot: Throw something out (also used when money is thrown out of a wedding car).
Most people associate hoy-oot with weddings and, yes it is, but it really means just to throw out.
.. and I found a few other Geordie or Tyneside websites that listed hoy similarly .. so there you have it .. but I am surprised that this meaning was not listed somewhere in Onelook .. my wee Concise Oxford didn't list it but maybe Ken can take a geek in his BIG OED ..

.. there was a suggestion in the Macquarie 4 that the word hoy may derive from the word hoick but I could not find any further support for that idea ..
hoick 3. Colloquial to throw [origin uncertain; ? variant of HIKE]
WoZ of Aus 16/11/06
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hoy

Post by Ken Greenwald » Thu Nov 16, 2006 6:19 am

Wiz, I came up with nothing that was related to your HOY in the OED. However, I did find two other sources that listed it:

Cassell’s Dictionary of Slang by Jonathon Green

HOY verb (Australian): 1) [1920s and still in use] To drag; to take. 2) [1930s and still in use] To get rid of, to discard [dialect hoy, to throw, to heave/Standard English haul]

HOICK verb [20th century and still in use] 1) To lift or hoist, with a jerk or snatch. 2) To drag (out of). [? Standard English hike, drag]

HOICK verb [late 19th century and still in use] (Australian) To spit [Standard English hawk] [[I found ‘hawk’ to be defined as a noisy clearing of the throat, but not spitting]]
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A Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English by Eric Partridge

HOY verb: 1) To haul: Australian (? colloquial rather than slang): since circa 1920. Perhaps a blend of hoist and haul. 2) Hence; to take, as in ‘I had to hoy myself down to Bega’: Australian since circa 1920. 3) To discard: Australian: since circa 1930. Cf. hoist

HOICK verb: To raise, hoist, especially with a jerk; colloquial: late 19th to early 20th century
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It’s conceivable that HOICK could be related to HOY and even the ‘spit’ definition could imply ‘get rid of’ – sort of – but this all is only mere conjecture.
_______________________

Ken – November 15, 2006
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hoy

Post by tony h » Fri Nov 17, 2006 4:59 pm

A Chinaman sailing past woz's house calls out, "junk ahoy".

Sound of Viking origin to me. Surely Haro would know.
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With the right context almost anything can sound appropriate.

hoy

Post by Wizard of Oz » Mon Nov 20, 2006 11:34 am

.. in looking for the meaning of the verb hoy I became aware that it is Aussies who have the game of Hoy which is what we, but mainly Queenslanders, call the game of Housie or Bingo ..

WoZ in Aus 20/11/06
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Signature: "The question is," said Alice, "whether you can make words mean so many different things."

Re: hoy

Post by rocity » Sun Oct 31, 2010 10:43 am

Very likely related to hoick, as in the verb "hoicking" (hiking up?) +/OR as in "Tally! Hoick!" (fox hunt call ...pronounced "ike"). Hyke/hike seem they must be related, although my limited sources state etymology "unknown".
I once found (& am presently seeking again) etymological transitions/translations to "yike" & "zoiks".
Any pointers?
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Re: hoy

Post by hsargent » Wed Nov 03, 2010 3:15 pm

After rereading Oz's first item, I decided he had found the origin in a word which has not floated to the US. Thus I withdrew my comments.
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Re: hoy

Post by Cencerro » Sat Feb 20, 2016 4:34 pm

On Tyneside (England), the custom of throwing coins from the Bride's car on leaving her parents' house or throwing coins from the newly-wedded couple's limousine when leaving a church was termed the HOY-OUT and provided the reason for all the children of the neighbourhood to assemble at both locations in the hope of obtaining free cash.
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Re: hoy

Post by Wizard of Oz » Wed Feb 24, 2016 3:44 pm

Not to mention a few of the local lads looking for some drinking silver ay Cencerro?

WoZ who hoys out nothing
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Signature: "The question is," said Alice, "whether you can make words mean so many different things."

End of topic.
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