Friday the 13th

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Friday the 13th

Post by DirtyMac » Tue Jul 18, 2006 2:29 pm

Why is Friday the 13th considered a bad luck day?
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Friday the 13th

Post by Bobinwales » Tue Jul 18, 2006 3:03 pm

Well, this being a forum on language, I can tell you that if you have a fear of Friday 13th you have Paraskevidekatriaphobia.

As to why it is considered unlucky, you could do worse than start your research here:

http://urbanlegends.about.com/cs/histor ... e_13th.htm

.
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Friday the 13th

Post by Wizard of Oz » Wed Jul 19, 2006 1:07 pm

.. my number one grandson, Oliver, was born on Easter Friday 13th and my number 3 grandaughter, Charlotte, was born on Friday 13th the same as her mother, Kat .. so many conjunctions and so few sentences ..

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Friday the 13th

Post by Ken Greenwald » Wed Jul 19, 2006 5:36 pm

I was 13 years old on Friday the 13th. And people told me that I shoulda stood in bed. But it all turned out O.K.

Note: To find the day of the week for any day in history back to 1753 see the Day of the Week Calculator at http://www.travelfurther.net/dates/datesrus.asp
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Friday the 13th

Post by Ken Greenwald » Thu Jul 20, 2006 4:59 am

Here’s some more Friday the 13th stuff, which does have some overlap with Bob’s link, but also has some other good stuff:

Cassell’s Dictionary of Superstitions (1995) by David Pickering

FRIDAY, subject to Venus, is widely held to be unlucky and a day when evil influences are at work—especially if it happens to be the thirteenth day of the month. The day that Eve offered the apple to Adam in the Garden of Eden, Friday is favoured for the holding of witches’ covens and was formerly the customary day for hangings. Accidents are more frequent on Fridays (though visits to the doctor are not advised), and clothes made on that day will not fit. Projects or trips begun on a Friday will not prosper and any person who laughs on that day, says one old proverb, will cry on Sunday. Many people add that Friday is also an inauspicious day for moving house or for weddings, and formerly in some parts of the British Isles those who courted their lovers on Friday were hounded by friends and neighbors banging noisily on pans and kettles. According to one old Shropshire superstition, news received on a Friday makes a physical impression upon the hearer in the form of a new wrinkle for every tiding. Children born on Friday will prove unlucky, but will enjoy the gift of second sight and healing powers. Many claim that the weather on Friday will be repeated on the following Sunday.

THIRTEEN: Of all numbers, thirteen is the most ill starred. The prejudice against the number thirteen is almost universal and many people (who may be identified technically as ‘triskaidekaphobics’) will go to considerable lengths to avoid any association with the number. As a result there are many streets throughout the Western world which have no house with this number, and many hotels which lack a room thirteen and even a thirteenth floor, going directly from twelve to fourteen. Witches’ covens traditionally have thirteen members, and in tarot card decks the number thirteen is reserved for Death.

    Most unlucky of all is the discovery that one has sat down to dinner at a table where thirteen people are present, a reference to the fact that there were thirteen people present at the Last Supper, where Judas Iscariot was the thirteenth. Superstition has it that the first person to rise (or otherwise the last person to be seated) will die within a year. The only remedy is for all to sit and stand together, or for one or more of the party to be seated at another table.

    Equally ubiquitous is the fear that a Friday, itself an unlucky day, that falls on the thirteenth day of the month is a day when anything that can go wrong will go wrong. Even in modern technologically advanced society, business will fall off whenever a ‘Friday the thirteenth’ comes round as important deals are delayed until a more propitious date. New undertakings of may other kinds, including weddings and other event of a personal nature, will also be postponed.

    In reality, the prejudice against the number thirteen is of obscure origins, as evidence exists of it in Roman civilisation long before Christ and the Last Supper, which is none the less usually cited as the source of the superstition. Perhaps significantly, the number thirteen was to the ancient Egyptians the last step of the ladder via which the soul reached eternity, though other authorities have suggested Hindu origins.
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Friday the 13th

Post by gdwdwrkr » Thu Jul 20, 2006 9:17 am

As we say concerning antiques, "There were dumb people then, too."
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Friday the 13th

Post by Wizard of Oz » Thu Jul 20, 2006 11:02 am

.. to add further trivia ..

Thirteen
  • The Turks so dislike the number that the word is almost expunged from their vocabulary.
  • The Italians never use it in making up the numbers of their lotteries.
  • In Paris no house bears the number
.. Ken's observation on 13 at a meal was around in other mythologies ..
Sitting down thirteen at dinner, in old Norse mythology, was deemed unlucky, because at a banquet in the Valhalla, Loki once intruded, making thirteen guests, and Baldur was slain.
.. however the French have a solution to this social faux pas with the use of quatorziennes (fourteeners).
quatorziennes: Persons of recognised position in society who hold themselves in readiness to accept an invitation to dinner when otherwise the number of guests would be thirteen.
Friday
  • Fairies and all the tribes of elves of every description, according to mediæval romance, are converted into hideous animals on Friday, and remain so till Monday.
  • For the Norsemen it was regarded as the luckiest day of the week when weddings took place
  • Christians regard it as the day of the crucifixion
  • In England, it is not unlucky to be born on this day as Friday's child is loving and giving
[h] (Source: Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. 1898.) [/h]

WoZ of Aus 20/07/06
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Friday the 13th

Post by haro » Thu Jul 20, 2006 10:30 pm

Just in case someone is wondering why it is 'paraskevidekatriaphobia' but 'triskaidekaphobics' - 'tris kai deka' (= three and ten) is the older version, genuine Ancient Greek, whereas 'dekatria' (=ten-three) is the newer one, as used also in Modern Greek. 'Paraskevi' means 'preparation' both in Ancient and Modern Greek. In the context above it means the day of preparation for Sabbath in the New Testament, i.e. Friday.
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