loudspeaker

Discuss word origins and meanings.
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loudspeaker

Post by hasselhoff » Tue Jun 13, 2006 9:46 am

Hi

In another forum, I discuss the origin of the word "loudspeaker". Does anyone here know?
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Post by gdwdwrkr » Wed Jun 14, 2006 9:12 am

now we do.
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Post by Bobinwales » Wed Jun 14, 2006 2:32 pm

From what I can gather, Alexander Graham Bell patented the loudspeaker for use in a telephone in 1876. I suppose he called it a loudspeaker to differentiate from the human speaker at the other end. It’s possible that he could have called it the-bit-that-goes-in-your-ear-speaker, so I suppose we should be grateful.

Have you ever thought that life might have been different if the telephone had been first patented by Alexander Graham Buzzer?
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Signature: All those years gone to waist!
Bob in Wales

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Post by gdwdwrkr » Wed Jun 14, 2006 3:32 pm

Alexander Graham Cracker
Alexander Graham Foghorn
Alexander Wehr
......
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Post by Ken Greenwald » Wed Jun 14, 2006 3:45 pm

Bob, I dread to think that I might have worn buzzer-bottom pants, danced with the buzzer of the ball, done experiments in a buzzer jar, followed buzzwethers, tipped buzzer-hops at hotels, had Buzzer South for a phone company, bought products with all the buzzers and whistles, eaten buzzer peppers, read Buzzer, Book and Candle, and had to work with the buzzer-shaped curve.

Thank you Alexander for saving me from all that.
__________________

Ken – June 14, 2006
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Post by Edwin Ashworth » Wed Jun 14, 2006 10:43 pm

The Lord of the Rings.
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Post by gdwdwrkr » Sun Jun 18, 2006 4:31 pm

from
http://www.thocp.net/biographies/bell_alexander.html
Bell died on August 2, 1922. On the day of his burial, all telephone service in the US was stopped for one minute in his honor.
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Post by haro » Mon Jun 19, 2006 12:46 am

As for Bell - the matter is not that simple. See http://www.guardian.co.uk/Archive/Artic ... 63,00.html

What's more, Ernst Siemens, Germany, patented his moving-coil loudspeaker in 1874, two years before Bell applied for a patent for the invention Meucci had called teletrofono. Which still does not answer the question if Bell called that component loudspeaker and if he was the first to use that word.
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Signature: Hans Joerg Rothenberger
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Post by gdwdwrkr » Mon Jun 19, 2006 1:09 am

We're on hold, haro, with hasselhoff.
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Post by Wizard of Oz » Sun Jun 25, 2006 2:52 am

.. haro you are risking a visit from the CIA for suggesting that some foreigner actually invented something before the yanks .. be aware it has little to do with whether you are correct or not ..

WoZ of Aus 25/06/06
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Post by haro » Sun Jun 25, 2006 11:15 pm

WoZ I know, but there are more serious reasons for a visit from the CIA.
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Signature: Hans Joerg Rothenberger
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Post by gdwdwrkr » Mon Jun 26, 2006 12:01 am

I think they got Hasselhoff.
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Post by Bobinwales » Mon Jun 26, 2006 8:37 am

Actualy Alexander Graham Bell was born a Scot. The Yanks had nothing at all to do with it.

Why is there a big gentleman standing behind my chair with a big bulge under his jacket, and a radio receiver in his ear?
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Post by Edwin Ashworth » Mon Jun 26, 2006 9:52 am

He's from the patents office, Bob. Something to do with Scotch Rabbit.
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