terms for [[folksy]] expressions

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terms for [[folksy]] expressions

Post by p. g. cox » Wed Apr 19, 2006 2:51 am

I was watching an episode of M*A*S*H which depicted a boorish character who would color his dialog with expressions such as "Well tie me to an anthill and daub my ears with jam" I know that there must be a term for this but have been unable to find it. Can anyone help? Thank you.
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terms for [[folksy]] expressions

Post by Ken Greenwald » Wed Apr 19, 2006 5:24 pm

Peter, I can’t think of a word that exactly fits. I’ve got several books devoted to these types of ‘sayings’ and ‘colloquialisms’ and the nearest they seem to come to giving them a name is to call them FOLK TALK/SAYINGS, COUNTRY TALK/SAYINGS, which are probably a little more general than what you are looking for. The description FOLK TALK is also often preceded by modifiers such as ‘mountain,’ ‘country,’ ‘Yorkshire,’ ‘Appalachian,’ etc. Note that in the first quote below that ‘folk talk’ is also applied to city language.
<“His is the language of Arkansas and Mississippi, the Gullah of South Carolina, and the hip talk of N.Y.C. and other Afro-urban areas. Yet beneath all this "FOLK TALK" lies a highly complex system of rhythmic philosophy.”—Department of English, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, http://www.english.uiuc.edu/MAPS/poets/ ... msippi.htm >

<“COUNTY TALK is pictures set to words. If I said it was very cold outside, that would be a milk toast sort of language. But, if I said it was so cold outside that my teeth were chattering and they were in a glass on the dresser, then you would get a strange image of an impossible situation but you would also know it was, indeed, very cold outside.”—‘That Cat Won’t Flush’ by Wallace O. Chariton, v.>
Incidetnatlly, my Ozark stepmom's take on how cold it is outiside (see second quote above) would be "colder than a well digger's ass."

(Down in the Holler (1953) by Randolph and Wilson, That Cat Won’t Flush (1991) by Chariton, This Dog’ll Really Hunt (1999) by Chariton, Handy as Hip Pockets on a Hog (1989) by Black, Yorkshire Folk-Talk (1892) by Marmaduke C. F. Morris)
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Ken G – April 19, 2006
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terms for [[folksy]] expressions

Post by p. g. cox » Wed Apr 19, 2006 11:14 pm

Thanks for your research Ken, I feel better now that you have been unable to find a definitive answer. I had tried several sources via Google but had drawn a blank. I rather like the "Country Talk" label, it seeems to fit the bill. The character in question hailed from Arkansas. "Well rub me with a side of pork and roll me in the mud"
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terms for [[folksy]] expressions

Post by RWalter » Thu Apr 20, 2006 5:22 am

There was a 1970's TV show in the U.S. called "McCloud". The main character was a sheriff from a small country town who was assigned to work with the New York City police. He frequently used these kinds of folksy expressions, to the consternation of his superiors. His boss called these expressions "barnyard bromides".
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