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chug hole

Posted: Thu Jun 08, 2006 6:05 pm
by Shelley
Thanks, Bobinwales -- that's just the thing. The pictures on the site show exactly what was on the video. My computer's Encarta Dictionary defines spelunking as "the sport or pastime of exploring caves. U.K. term. speleology n.2"
Hmm . . . "sport or pastime", eh? Looks more like a bad dream I had once! Actually I've enjoyed visits to caves, as long as I can stay on my feet.

chug hole

Posted: Thu Jun 08, 2006 10:47 pm
by tony h
In England Potholing and caveing mean pretty much the same, I think the only real difference is the nature of the entrance.

My original foray was in response to a posting on the works noticeboad. It suggested a weekend exploring caves in France - I though I was in for wine tasting.

chug hole

Posted: Thu Jun 08, 2006 10:59 pm
by tony h
From Chambers's
Chuck : a gentle blow under the chin, a toss or throw; any game of pitch and toss eg chuck-farthing. from French choquer to jolt


seems a plausible root

chug hole

Posted: Fri Jun 09, 2006 9:43 am
by Bobinwales
Tony I think that you will find that potholing and caving are pretty much the same thing all over the UK not just in England.

chug hole

Posted: Sat Jun 10, 2006 12:25 am
by gdwdwrkr
http://www.roadsideamerica.com/tips/get ... onNo==1077

Potholes here are wash holes which formed in stream-bottoms as the swirling action of moving water caused abrasive stones to wear away ever-deepening circular depressions.
When the local limestone quarry workers blast open a new section of the rockface, out roll "perfectly" round balls of quartz, some as large as cantalopes, which had worn the potholes in the softer limestone. Some have large collections of these round stones which tempt me to covetousness.