diva

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diva

Post by big_scandal89 » Fri Jul 15, 2005 9:00 am

Please tell me about the origin of the word "Diva".
TIA
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diva

Post by Bobinwales » Fri Jul 15, 2005 9:27 am

It's an Italian word, and means a renowned opera singer. It got to the Italian from Latin, where it means “goddess”.
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diva

Post by Alton » Fri Jul 15, 2005 12:16 pm

Big scandal,
I imagine that the word Diva has the same root as our word "divine'.
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diva

Post by Ken Greenwald » Fri Jul 15, 2005 6:43 pm

Dear Big, If you wanted to know the origin of DIVA, you could have just looked it up in one of the recommended online dictionaries. If after looking it up there was something you didn't understand, or if you wanted furhter detail, you could have asked for that.

Where I came from a ‘diva’ was a member of my Brooklyn Technical High School diving team, but other people thought it was a distinguished female singer – a prima donna (operatic, jazz, etc.), which first appeared in print in 1883 and, as mentioned above, was borrowed from the Italian word for goddess, lady-love, fine lady, which came from the Latin ‘diva,’ goddess, female divinity, feminine of ‘divus,’ divine (one), god, deity.
<1883 “The latest DIVA of the drama.”—in “Harper’s Magazine,” by Black, February, page 465/2>

<1894 'Operatic singers of the other sex are to be engaged, but no DIVA.'—‘Tablet,’ 7 April, page 531>

<1923 “France Farrar is supposed to have been pro-German during the War. Of course, she did have her pre-American career in Germany. Many Americans, however, will remember the DIVA singing The Star Spangled Banner with great fervor at various times during the hostilities.” ‘Time Magazine,’ 13 August>
(M-W.com, Oxford English Dictionary, Barnhart Concise Dictionary of Etymology)
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Ken G – July 15, 2005
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