Here's mud in your eye!

Discuss word origins and meanings.

Re: Here's mud in your eye!

Post by Edwin F Ashworth » Wed Sep 19, 2012 11:13 pm

His name is mud in your eyes.
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Re: Here's mud in your eye!

Post by Sandy » Sat Nov 16, 2013 5:23 am

I used this expression today that I've blindly quoted from my father in the past. When I was questioned and decided to search the origins, I found the information posted here. How refreshing for KG to expect responsible postings and Shelly to accept responsibility and appreciate insight. The horse racing theory seems to follow the light-hearted challenge that dad would deliver the toast with and although he served in Korea and Vietnam, I didn't get the sense that he related it to his time in the service. Ugh - That would have been, "Here's to Agent Orange in your eye." Certainly not a jovial toast. Wish he was still around to ask. Thanks for all of the information, Shelly; and the Biblical tie, Alan.
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Re: Here's mud in your eye!

Post by Edwin F Ashworth » Sat Nov 16, 2013 11:14 am

Hello Sandy. It's good to hear from someone who appreciates attempts to maintain standards of scholarship (though the standards of humour here never seem to reach the same high level).

It's to Ken's credit that he didn't expunge the crude insults hurled at him. He could have done it easily by the clicking of a couple of buttons. In fact, having been given this frightening power myself, I've done this (on other threads) merely by accident before now. When removing spam, ads for false noses say. But he's a hardened campaigner, virtually unaffected by the occasional misdirected mud pie. He's usually too busy digging up sound evidence concerning word and phrase origins to worry about personal invective. In fact, he probably thinks it's important enough to allow others to register contrary opinions to keep such criticisms, even when the major (I almost said 'only') point they stress is their author's rather than Ken's character.

I remember that he correctly criticised one of my early postings, where I put forward a folk etymology for a phrase I'd been exposed to when visiting an open-air museum, as 'sounding like it has an authority rating of 98% when the truth is it's somewhere nearer 5%' (I'm paraphrasing, but you get the idea). Imagine a dictionary where the standards are equally as sloppy (you're probably thinking of the same one I am). From what I can remember, the 22nd source he checks in for reliable information when he's tackling an expression is the OED, which is usually regarded as nigh-on infallible, and he often exposes OED's shortcomings. Since he's now over 40, he might be expected to miss the occasional typo, but most of his amendments to his posts consist of newly found information. It's a privilege to have his work freely available here.

The only major fault I can accuse him of is that, having fallen amongst third-rate comedians here, he has succumbed to the disease:

'I've since toned down and now highly recommend that everyone should quote unreliable sources!'
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Re: Here's mud in your eye!

Post by Erik_Kowal » Sat Nov 16, 2013 2:30 pm

I object to the term 'third-rate comedians'.

Those of us who are second-rate comedians know that we're much better than that.
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Re: Here's mud in your eye!

Post by Edwin F Ashworth » Sun Nov 17, 2013 9:46 am

As opposed to those of us who swallowed a joke book when young and now just can't stop gagging.
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Re: Here's mud in your eye!

Post by Bobinwales » Mon Nov 18, 2013 7:48 pm

Forum Admin, perhaps it would perfectly acceptable to delete all of the recent posts. Including this one.
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Signature: All those years gone to waist!
Bob in Wales

Re: Here's mud in your eye!

Post by Erik_Kowal » Mon Nov 18, 2013 7:57 pm

Bob, they are all part of the legacy we owe to posteriority.

Forum Admin.
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Re: Here's mud in your eye!

Post by Wizard of Oz » Tue Nov 19, 2013 4:29 am

Hear hear Bob. Well said.

WoZ
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Signature: "The question is," said Alice, "whether you can make words mean so many different things."

End of topic.
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