three on a match

Discuss word origins and meanings.

three on a match

Post by Erik_Kowal » Fri May 06, 2005 9:35 am

Ken, I like the sound of the competition, but following the link only took me to a generic submissions page which gave no details of the May challenge you mentioned. I have a feeling you can only view that page if you are a subscriber -- am I correct?

Meanwhile, if my own case can be taken as a reliable guide, I may be able to shed some light on "the rolling of peanuts in the hand before raising the hand to the mouth". I do this myself when the peanuts I am eating are encrusted with so much salt or sugar that they would otherwise be inedible; rolling them around in the hand, with slightly separated fingers, rubs off the excess salt or sugar and allows it to escape through one's fingers onto the floor of the cinema, one's navel, or the beer of an ex-friend (depending on the situation).
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: -- Looking up a word? Try OneLook's metadictionary (--> definitions) and reverse dictionary (--> terms based on your definitions)8-- Contribute favourite diary entries, quotations and more here8 -- Find new postings easily with Active Topics8-- Want to research a word? Get essential tips from experienced researcher Ken Greenwald

three on a match

Post by Phil White » Fri May 06, 2005 10:42 am

And I developed the habit of smoking a cigarette in a cupped hand from smoking in the murkier corners of the school yard. It's stuck with me since, at least whenever I smoke out of doors.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: Phil White
Non sum felix lepus

three on a match

Post by Ken Greenwald » Fri May 06, 2005 6:11 pm

Erik, Thanks for the 'nuts' explanation. It sounds like that could be the answer. But would some people, perhaps even you, still do it by reflex (as Phil still cups his hand) if they were eating the dry roasted, unsalted/unsugared variety?

Sorry for the Atlantic confusion, but this was a strange one. I do subscribe to the hard copy, but I had never registered for the online issue. When I went to the site just a few minutes ago, as I had done last night, there were various links on the left side of the page and I hit ‘Back Issues' and went to 'May' and the Word Fugitves section. I then started to write this e-mail explaining what I had done and went back to recheck and this time I couldn’t get back to the Word Fugitives (that’s after having gotten there twice) – it said I had to be a subscriber. I then went through the registration process, which I had never done before (if I had been previously registered I’m sure I would have gotten the message that I was already registered). So I guess it must have been through a bug in their system or some kind of fluke that I had previously gotten through. But now that I am registered, and there doesn’t appear to be a logout button, I can’t retry anything in a non-registered mode. Just for the hell of it you might try http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/200505/wallraff for the article and http://www.theatlantic.com/unbound/fugi ... itives.htm for the submission form, but chances are it wont work.

In any event, the question is as I have stated in the posting above Bob’s ‘blundervision’ response and if anyone should have trouble getting into the Word Fugitives submission form, you could send me a private e-mail through our site and I can submit it for you (only info required is name, city, state, e-mail address). Or one could submit it by snail mail to:

Word Fugitives
The Atlantic Monthly
77 North Washington Street
Boston, MA02114
_________________

Ken – May 6, 2005
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

three on a match

Post by Bobinwales » Fri May 06, 2005 6:49 pm

Ken, it does look as though one has to be a subscriber. That being the case I give you the word with my compliments. Give it a go, good luck, and tell me how you got on.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: All those years gone to waist!
Bob in Wales

three on a match

Post by Shelley » Fri May 06, 2005 7:10 pm

Another note about cigarette etiquette (say that five times fast) in the trenches: soldiers were taught to "fieldstrip" their butts (cigarette butts, that is) to avoid leaving evidence of their presence around (paper and, beginning with WWII, filters). This involved gently rolling the butt between the thumb and fingers until the remaining tobacco fell to the ground, and then pocketing the paper and filter until it could be discarded properly. Of course, in WWI, before filters, the bit of paper could be eaten! I guess this could also qualify as meaningless ritualistic behavior if one performed it off the side of a yacht during peacetime -- unless one is protecting the environment.
Sorry I don't have any book-ish sources for this piece of trivia. I'll try to provide them in future postings.
"Blundervision" -- great! Or, you could have an "oh-no-slow-mo'" moment.
Did I read recently that The Atlantic Monthly is ending, or has been bought, or something?
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

three on a match

Post by kagriffy » Fri May 06, 2005 8:43 pm

Shelley, I wish I could get the smokers around here to "fieldstrip" THEIR butts, rather than just flinging them out car windows or on the sidewalks! When I take a walk in downtown Springpatch during lunch hour, I have to be on constant alert to avoid being hit by "butt shrapnel"--many of them still burning, no less! AAARRRGGGHHHH!
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature:
K. Allen Griffy
Springfield, Illinois (USA)

ACCESS_END_OF_TOPIC
Post Reply