skinnymalink(s) / skinny malink(s) / skinny marink(s) / etc.

Discuss word origins and meanings.

skinnymalink(s) / skinny malink(s) / skinny marink(s) / etc.

Post by Zyrgle » Fri Feb 01, 2008 4:28 am

I am led to believe this term come from the military. In WW2 marine commands/orders were written on paper that was translucent and shiny therefore it resembled onion skin.

[Darren (a.k.a. Zyrgel), I've moved your posting from here to skinny (as in 'the skinny') where further comments on your posting should be directed. -- Forum Moderator]
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skinnymalink(s) / skinny malink(s) / skinny marink(s) / etc.

Post by Wizard of Oz » Sat Feb 09, 2008 4:25 am

.. recently I was spending time in my favourite bookshop, Borders, looking for some books for my grandchildren .. yes I buy them old fashioned books .. when I came across a book by Kiwi author Lynley Dodd called Slinky Malinki .. it is about the adventures of a "particularly rapscallion cat with superlative characteristics ..." .. and true to name the delightful drawings featured a very thin cat .. the earlier books by the same author featured a terrier dog named Hairy Maclary .. a slight Scottish influence maybe ?? ..

WoZ of Aus 09/02/08
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Signature: "The question is," said Alice, "whether you can make words mean so many different things."

skinnymalink(s) / skinny malink(s) / skinny marink(s) / etc.

Post by tony h » Sat Feb 09, 2008 8:43 pm

old fashioned books
they sound like rather modern books!
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Signature: tony

I'm puzzled therefore I think.

skinnymalink(s) / skinny malink(s) / skinny marink(s) / etc.

Post by Wizard of Oz » Sun Feb 10, 2008 3:26 am

.. ah yes tony but they are old fashioned in the sense they YOU have to READ them and if there is a word you can't pronounce YOU have to work it out and you can't click on bits and pieces to make them dance or sing to you and you are required to use your OWN imagination to create the mind pictures to go with the scenes and characters .. and not a battery in sight ..

WoZ in Aus 10/02/08
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Signature: "The question is," said Alice, "whether you can make words mean so many different things."

skinnymalink(s) / skinny malink(s) / skinny marink(s) / etc.

Post by Shelley » Sun Feb 10, 2008 1:23 pm

I dunno, WoZ . . . sounds pretty radical. Subversive, even. Could be addictive. too. How can you? -- turning your own grandchildren on to the solitary habit? As usual, the first one's free . . . I for one am shocked. Shocked!
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skinnymalink(s) / skinny malink(s) / skinny marink(s) / etc.

Post by gdwdwrkr » Sun Feb 10, 2008 6:20 pm

Yes. They should be burned. Burned!
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Re: skinnymalink(s) / skinny malink(s) / skinny marink(s) / etc.

Post by bsb43250 » Tue Sep 16, 2008 4:32 am

I have a friend from Milwaukee, Wisconsin who once called his boss "Skinny Malink the Graveyard Dancer." My friend worked part-time in a funeral home! The name fit the person well.
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Re: skinnymalink(s) / skinny malink(s) / skinny marink(s) / etc.

Post by stella » Wed Jan 13, 2010 6:11 pm

Like many another reader, I used to shout "Skinny Malinky" in the playground at various enemies, during the late 1940's and early 1950's and never gave a thought to what it meant or how it was spelt.
Now that I have recently started learning Spanish, I think that Skinny Malinky is in fact Skinny Malinche, and harks back to a Scottish connection with Spain.
There just is no other explanation for this odd word, 'Malinky' cropping up.
Malinche was a Mexican girl (about 1500 to about 1530) who became the interpreter then the mistress of Hernan Cortez.
She's still an infamous figure in Mexico ; they regard her as a traitor to her own people because she advised the Spaniards in their conquest. They still use the epithet Malinche as an ugly epithet.
As far as the Scottish connection is concerned, It is known that Spanish ships from the Armada were wrecked around the Scottish coast in 1588. The epithet 'Malinche' could well have been transmitted by surviving Spanish sailors.
There are other Spanish words in Scottish - my mother from Ayrshire talked about somehing being an awful 'trachle' meaning hard work, or she'd say, "I'm not going to trachle all that stuff up here" meaning haul or drag. The Spanish verb is 'traher'.
You'll know lots more words I'm sure.
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Re: skinnymalink(s) / skinny malink(s) / skinny marink(s) / etc.

Post by Noo » Sat Jan 01, 2011 1:04 am

Ok, so I know this is a while since the last posting, but this is amazing! I was telling my boys what their grandmother used to call me as a child and we decided to Google "Skinny Balink" as a bit of a joke. I hadn't thought of it for 30 years and had absolutely no idea that this was known elsewhere as I thought it was just something mum used to say! How weird... Glad to see it has a Scottish background - keep it Celtic - we're Cornish!

Happy New Year to you all and hope you all have a great 2011. XXXX
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Re: skinnymalink(s) / skinny malink(s) / skinny marink(s) / etc.

Post by MKopacz » Sat Mar 20, 2021 3:44 pm

Hi, brand new to this sight. I was searching "Skinny Balink" and wound up here! This was a phrase we used where I grew up (a mill town north of Boston).
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